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10 mars 2015 2 10 /03 /mars /2015 19:30
HMAS Success works with USS Iwo Jima in Middle East


10 march 2015 defence.gov.au/
 

HMAS Success’ ship’s company in the Middle East recently witnessed the awesome display of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s amphibious vessel USS Iwo Jima.

Deployed on Operation MANITOU, Success was in company with the Iwo Jima on transit through the Gulf of Aden.

Iwo Jima carries MH-60S Seahawk, MH-53E Super Sea Stallion, Bell AH-1W Super Cobra and Bell UH-1N Twin Huey helicopters, as well as Bell MV-22 Osprey (tilt rotor) aircraft and AV-8B Harrier Jets.

Boatswains Mate Able Seaman Thomas Darcy said it was incredible seeing Iwo Jima’s operations up close.

“The Harrier Jets sliced the air leaving a stream line from their wing tips which produced great action photos. This was definitely the highlight of our deployment so far.”

Success recently conducted a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) evolution with Iwo Jima, transferring 685 cubic meters (CZ) of F76 marine diesel fuel, and 405 CZ of F44 aviation fuel to the carrier, the latter a record amount for the RAN’s Battle Tanker.

Iwo Jima dwarfs Success, a tanker that usually makes other warships look small.

It was a stunning sight for Success’ crew, which is used to looking down on frigates or corvettes from the flag deck.

Success’ own embarked dependable S-70B-2 Seahawk spent much of the RAS evolution in the air, capturing images of this spectacular scene.

Pilot Lieutenant Jordan Taylor was impressed by Iwo Jima’s aviation capability.

“I can see why these ships are so versatile,” he said.

“The flight decks on these types of carriers would be among the most dangerous workplaces in the world.

“There is so much happening, with such little margin for error.”

Success is in the Middle East on Operation MANITOU, the ADF’s contribution to maritime security, stability and prosperity in the area.

Working occasionally as part of Combined Task Force 53, Success provides logistical support to Combined Maritime Fleet coalition naval ships in the Middle East, enabling them to remain on patrol for longer periods.

Success is due to return home to Fleet Base East in June.

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28 février 2015 6 28 /02 /février /2015 15:45
French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment members provide over watch during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015

French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment members provide over watch during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015

 

27.02.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

 

La lecture des sites web des cousins d'outre-Atlantique réserve parfois de bonnes surprises.

Sur le site du CJTF-HoA (Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa) a été mis en ligne un article, en date du 23 février, intitulé: "CAS training prepares coalition forces for future operations".

L'article est à lire ici.

On y apprend qu'entre le 31 janvier et le 4 février, à Djibouti, des JTAC de la 24th MEU et du 3e RAMa ont œuvré ensemble au profit d'hélicoptères HH-60 Pave Hawks et de Rafale-M. Précision: les JTAC français provenaient aussi du 40e RA et du COS.

Au menu: des exercices de CAS (close air support) et de SAR (search and rescue). Interviewé par les Américains, un pilote britannique, le Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan (entre anglophones, c'est plus facile). Ce capitaine de corvette est actuellement détaché au sein de la 11F et vole sur SEM. Le site navynews.co.uk lui a d'ailleurs consacré en décembre dernier une double page (à voir ici).

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Airway pilots for upcoming operations," a-t-il déclaré, anticipant l'entrée en guerre du GAN lundi.

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27 février 2015 5 27 /02 /février /2015 08:45
photo USAF

photo USAF

Joint terminal attack controllers from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Maritime Raid Force and French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment observe the exercise during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015. The event was part of a scheduled bilateral CAS exercise between a contingent of MEU Marines and French soldiers and sailors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

 

Arta, Djibouti, February 24, 2015 By Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma - CJTF-HOA

 

French and U.S. coalition forces conducted a live and simulated close air support exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 2015.

 

The five-day event involved the U.S. 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the French 3rd Marine Artillery Regiment joint terminal attack controllers guiding U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawks and French Air Force Rafale-M multirole combat fighters to specified targets during the day and night CAS exercise.

 

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Airway pilots for upcoming operations," said Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan, British Royal Navy exchange pilot to the French Naval Airway.

 

To increase partner nation interoperability, each exercise day was separated into three sections with two aircraft guided by both nations' JTACs, illustrating the different operating conditions they may encounter in future operations.

 

These exercises introduced both military partners to integrating and refining work tactics for time-sensitive procedures. A JTAC instructor evaluated the teams in locating targets on different terrain and communication skills between one another.  This exercise ensured that all aerial munitions called in by coalition JTACs and delivered by both nations' aircraft were on target and on time.

 

According to Sloan, it is easy to conduct training inside your comfort zone when you are doing it in a familiar environment.  However, working with coalition nations using different languages and procedures, in unfamiliar terrain, is when the real benefits come out of the training/exercise/event.

 

English was the designated language for both U.S. and French forces, their conduct of all CAS missions became successful by working through the language barriers and completing specific directions that are unique to each country.  Communication challenges included different military language being used over the radio from both nations and the available light.

 

"There were mostly similarities controlling the aircraft, especially procedural control," said U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ashley McMillan, 24th MEU senior air director and Air Support Element officer-in-charge. "It can only be done one way. It's almost like having a universal language, the pilots knew what to expect from the JTAC and exactly what they had to do."

 

By the end of the exercise, both JTAC parties gained valuable experiences by working through friction points during the exercise, in turn helping strengthen relations and improving security amongst participating partner nations.

 

"It's always a benefit to train with our coalition partners, and any opportunity you get to do that is worth taking," said Sloan. "Even if you think you have learned all the lessons and you're on top of your game, there is always something to take away from the way other people do business."

 

The 24th MEU is currently embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF

photo USAF

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26 février 2015 4 26 /02 /février /2015 15:45
Weapons Co. conducts TRAP exercise with French forces photo USMC

Weapons Co. conducts TRAP exercise with French forces photo USMC

Marines with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, run to security positions during a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel drill in Djibouti, Feb. 2, 2015. During the TRAP training event, the MEU teamed up with French Marines and Sailors. The MEU is embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Joey Mendez/Released)

 

25 February 2015 by CJTF-HOA - defenceWeb

 

French and U.S. coalition forces conducted a live and simulated close air support (CAS) exercise in Arta, Djibouti, between January 31 and February 4.

 

The five-day event involved the U.S. 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the French 3rd Marine Artillery Regiment joint terminal attack controllers guiding U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawks and French Air Force Rafale-M multirole combat fighters to specified targets during the day and night CAS exercise.

 

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Air Arm pilots for upcoming operations," said Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan, British Royal Navy exchange pilot to the French Naval Air Arm.

 

To increase partner nation interoperability, each exercise day was separated into three sections with two aircraft guided by both nations' JTACs (Joint Terminal Attack Controllers), illustrating the different operating conditions they may encounter in future operations.

 

These exercises introduced both military partners to integrating and refining work tactics for time-sensitive procedures, Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) said. A JTAC instructor evaluated the teams in locating targets on different terrain and communication skills between one another. This exercise ensured that all aerial munitions called in by coalition JTACs and delivered by both nations' aircraft were on target and on time.

 

According to Sloan, it is easy to conduct training inside your comfort zone when you are doing it in a familiar environment. However, working with coalition nations using different languages and procedures, in unfamiliar terrain, is when the real benefits come out of the training/exercise/event.

 

English was the designated language for both U.S. and French forces, their conduct of all CAS missions became successful by working through the language barriers and completing specific directions that are unique to each country. Communication challenges included different military language being used over the radio from both nations and the available light.

 

"There were mostly similarities controlling the aircraft, especially procedural control," said U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ashley McMillan, 24th MEU senior air director and Air Support Element officer-in-charge. "It can only be done one way. It's almost like having a universal language, the pilots knew what to expect from the JTAC and exactly what they had to do."

 

By the end of the exercise, both JTAC parties gained valuable experiences by working through friction points during the exercise, in turn helping strengthen relations and improving security amongst participating partner nations.

 

"It's always a benefit to train with our coalition partners, and any opportunity you get to do that is worth taking," said Sloan. "Even if you think you have learned all the lessons and you're on top of your game, there is always something to take away from the way other people do business."

 

The 24th MEU is currently embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

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