Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
28 février 2015 6 28 /02 /février /2015 15:45
French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment members provide over watch during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015

French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment members provide over watch during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015

 

27.02.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

 

La lecture des sites web des cousins d'outre-Atlantique réserve parfois de bonnes surprises.

Sur le site du CJTF-HoA (Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa) a été mis en ligne un article, en date du 23 février, intitulé: "CAS training prepares coalition forces for future operations".

L'article est à lire ici.

On y apprend qu'entre le 31 janvier et le 4 février, à Djibouti, des JTAC de la 24th MEU et du 3e RAMa ont œuvré ensemble au profit d'hélicoptères HH-60 Pave Hawks et de Rafale-M. Précision: les JTAC français provenaient aussi du 40e RA et du COS.

Au menu: des exercices de CAS (close air support) et de SAR (search and rescue). Interviewé par les Américains, un pilote britannique, le Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan (entre anglophones, c'est plus facile). Ce capitaine de corvette est actuellement détaché au sein de la 11F et vole sur SEM. Le site navynews.co.uk lui a d'ailleurs consacré en décembre dernier une double page (à voir ici).

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Airway pilots for upcoming operations," a-t-il déclaré, anticipant l'entrée en guerre du GAN lundi.

Repost 0
27 février 2015 5 27 /02 /février /2015 08:45
photo USAF

photo USAF

Joint terminal attack controllers from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Maritime Raid Force and French 3rd Maine Artillery Regiment observe the exercise during a bilateral close air support training exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Feb. 4, 2015. The event was part of a scheduled bilateral CAS exercise between a contingent of MEU Marines and French soldiers and sailors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

 

Arta, Djibouti, February 24, 2015 By Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma - CJTF-HOA

 

French and U.S. coalition forces conducted a live and simulated close air support exercise in Arta, Djibouti, Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 2015.

 

The five-day event involved the U.S. 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the French 3rd Marine Artillery Regiment joint terminal attack controllers guiding U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawks and French Air Force Rafale-M multirole combat fighters to specified targets during the day and night CAS exercise.

 

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Airway pilots for upcoming operations," said Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan, British Royal Navy exchange pilot to the French Naval Airway.

 

To increase partner nation interoperability, each exercise day was separated into three sections with two aircraft guided by both nations' JTACs, illustrating the different operating conditions they may encounter in future operations.

 

These exercises introduced both military partners to integrating and refining work tactics for time-sensitive procedures. A JTAC instructor evaluated the teams in locating targets on different terrain and communication skills between one another.  This exercise ensured that all aerial munitions called in by coalition JTACs and delivered by both nations' aircraft were on target and on time.

 

According to Sloan, it is easy to conduct training inside your comfort zone when you are doing it in a familiar environment.  However, working with coalition nations using different languages and procedures, in unfamiliar terrain, is when the real benefits come out of the training/exercise/event.

 

English was the designated language for both U.S. and French forces, their conduct of all CAS missions became successful by working through the language barriers and completing specific directions that are unique to each country.  Communication challenges included different military language being used over the radio from both nations and the available light.

 

"There were mostly similarities controlling the aircraft, especially procedural control," said U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ashley McMillan, 24th MEU senior air director and Air Support Element officer-in-charge. "It can only be done one way. It's almost like having a universal language, the pilots knew what to expect from the JTAC and exactly what they had to do."

 

By the end of the exercise, both JTAC parties gained valuable experiences by working through friction points during the exercise, in turn helping strengthen relations and improving security amongst participating partner nations.

 

"It's always a benefit to train with our coalition partners, and any opportunity you get to do that is worth taking," said Sloan. "Even if you think you have learned all the lessons and you're on top of your game, there is always something to take away from the way other people do business."

 

The 24th MEU is currently embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF
photo USAF

photo USAF

Repost 0
26 février 2015 4 26 /02 /février /2015 15:45
Weapons Co. conducts TRAP exercise with French forces photo USMC

Weapons Co. conducts TRAP exercise with French forces photo USMC

Marines with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, run to security positions during a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel drill in Djibouti, Feb. 2, 2015. During the TRAP training event, the MEU teamed up with French Marines and Sailors. The MEU is embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Joey Mendez/Released)

 

25 February 2015 by CJTF-HOA - defenceWeb

 

French and U.S. coalition forces conducted a live and simulated close air support (CAS) exercise in Arta, Djibouti, between January 31 and February 4.

 

The five-day event involved the U.S. 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and the French 3rd Marine Artillery Regiment joint terminal attack controllers guiding U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawks and French Air Force Rafale-M multirole combat fighters to specified targets during the day and night CAS exercise.

 

"This is the first significant stop that we've made, conducting a live firing exercise in coordination with the U.S., preparing the French Naval Air Arm pilots for upcoming operations," said Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sloan, British Royal Navy exchange pilot to the French Naval Air Arm.

 

To increase partner nation interoperability, each exercise day was separated into three sections with two aircraft guided by both nations' JTACs (Joint Terminal Attack Controllers), illustrating the different operating conditions they may encounter in future operations.

 

These exercises introduced both military partners to integrating and refining work tactics for time-sensitive procedures, Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) said. A JTAC instructor evaluated the teams in locating targets on different terrain and communication skills between one another. This exercise ensured that all aerial munitions called in by coalition JTACs and delivered by both nations' aircraft were on target and on time.

 

According to Sloan, it is easy to conduct training inside your comfort zone when you are doing it in a familiar environment. However, working with coalition nations using different languages and procedures, in unfamiliar terrain, is when the real benefits come out of the training/exercise/event.

 

English was the designated language for both U.S. and French forces, their conduct of all CAS missions became successful by working through the language barriers and completing specific directions that are unique to each country. Communication challenges included different military language being used over the radio from both nations and the available light.

 

"There were mostly similarities controlling the aircraft, especially procedural control," said U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ashley McMillan, 24th MEU senior air director and Air Support Element officer-in-charge. "It can only be done one way. It's almost like having a universal language, the pilots knew what to expect from the JTAC and exactly what they had to do."

 

By the end of the exercise, both JTAC parties gained valuable experiences by working through friction points during the exercise, in turn helping strengthen relations and improving security amongst participating partner nations.

 

"It's always a benefit to train with our coalition partners, and any opportunity you get to do that is worth taking," said Sloan. "Even if you think you have learned all the lessons and you're on top of your game, there is always something to take away from the way other people do business."

 

The 24th MEU is currently embarked on the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

Repost 0
11 février 2015 3 11 /02 /février /2015 12:56
photo SM Luu Marine nationale

photo SM Luu Marine nationale

 

11 Février 2015 Source : Marine nationale

 

Le 10 février 2015, un détachement de la flottille amphibie (FLOPHIB) de Toulon a débarqué plusieurs compagnies de l’armée de Terre et de la Légion étrangère sur la plage du Dramont à Saint-Raphael (83) au cours d’un entraînement.

 

Embarqués à bord du bâtiment de projection et de commandement (BPC)  Mistral, deux chalands de transport de matériel (CTM) et un engin de débarquement amphibie rapide (EDA-R) ont été projetés sur la plage du Dramont au petit matin, afin d’y effectuer le débarquement de plusieurs compagnies du 21e régiment d’infanterie de Marine (21e RIMa), du 3e régiment d’artillerie de Marine (3e RAMa), du 1er régiment étranger du génie (1er REG) ainsi que du 1er régiment étranger de cavalerie (1er REC).

 

Guidé par les équipes de reconnaissance de plage (ERP) qui ont procédé quelques heures auparavant au balisage de la zone de débarquement, autrement appelée site de plageage l’engin du génie d’aménagement (EGAME) du 1er REG a d’abord installé un tapis métallique pour faciliter le débarquement des véhicules sur les galets. Au cours de la matinée, une dizaine de manœuvres entre le Mistral et la plage ont été effectuées par la batellerie amphibie, permettant ainsi le débarquement et l’embarquement d’une quarantaine de véhicules de tous types.

 

Qualification qui doit être validée dans le cadre de la préparation pour les opérations amphibies, le TECHPHIB consiste en une formation technique et tactique des manœuvres à la mer (porte à porte, enradiage, déradiage...). L’objectif est d’entraîner les conducteurs, pilotes et chefs de bord, ainsi que les troupes à pied de l’infanterie et du génie, aux techniques d'embarquement et de débarquement à partir des bâtiments amphibies. La rapidité et la fluidité de la mise à terre ou de la récupération des éléments terrestres constituent les facteurs essentiels de réussite de la manœuvre. La formation amphibie est à la fois individuelle et collective et s'adresse aux unités comme au commandement.

photos SM Luu Marine nationalephotos SM Luu Marine nationale
photos SM Luu Marine nationale
photos SM Luu Marine nationalephotos SM Luu Marine nationale

photos SM Luu Marine nationale

Repost 0
18 décembre 2014 4 18 /12 /décembre /2014 13:50
Exercice Brittany : Une relation canon

 

18/12/2014 Armée de Terre

 

Pendant près d’un mois, les Bigors du 3e régiment d'artillerie de marine stationné à Canjuers ont reçu leurs homologues britanniques du 1st régiment of Royal Horse Artillery.

 

Durant cet exercice nommé Brittany, les artilleurs français ont formé les soldats britanniques à l’utilisation du canon Caesar de 155 mm pour une expérimentation tactique. Après plusieurs jours d'instruction théorique, la section du 1stRHA a été intégrée à la 3ebatterie du 3eRAMa. À sa disposition, deux Caesar, avec lesquels elle a effectué un service en campagne avec tir.

 

L'expérimentation tactique du Caesar par les artilleurs britanniques tend à renforcer l'interopérabilité entre nos deux armées de Terre et en particulier entre les deux régiments. Ces échanges riches ont permis de créer des liens forts, essentiels pour instaurer une confiance de fer durant les opérations.

Repost 0
3 décembre 2013 2 03 /12 /décembre /2013 21:55
Cérémonie de dissolution de la Brigade interarmes SERVAL 2

2 déc. 2013 Armée de Terre

 

Le 27 novembre 2013 s'est déroulée sur la place d'armes du 2e régiment étranger d'infanterie à Nimes la cérémonie de dissolution de la Brigade Interarmes SERVAL 2* présidée par le général d'armée Bertrand RACT MADOUX, chef d'état-major de l'armée de Terre.
Après la lecture de l'ordre du jour le général d'armée Bertrand RACT MADOUX et le général de corps d'armée Bertrand CLEMENT-BOLEE commandant des Forces Terrestres ont effectué une remise de plusieurs récompenses pour des actions effectuées au Mali.

 

* 2e REI, 3e Rama, 1er REC, 1er et 3eme RHC et du 1er TIR

Repost 0
3 août 2009 1 03 /08 /août /2009 17:00
Trois canons Caesar renforcent les Français en Afghanistan

 

03/08/2009 Par Jean Guisnel - Lepoint.fr

 

Les trois premiers canons Caesar de 155 mm montés sur camion, qui seront prochainement suivis par cinq autres, sont arrivés à Kaboul samedi, nous apprend l'état-major des armées sur son site Web , en expliquant : "Ces pièces d'artillerie sont destinées à fournir un appui feu depuis les bases opérationnelles avancées lors d'opérations menées par le GTIA (groupement tactique interarmes) Kapisa et le BATFRA (Bataillon français) en Surobi. Elles sont armées par le 3e régiment d'artillerie de marine de Canjuers, et sont engagées pour la première fois sur un théâtre d'opérations".

 

Nos lecteurs connaissent ces engins , qui sont destinés à renforcer la puissance de feu des troupes françaises du GTIA Kapisa et du Batfra, qui ne disposent pour l'instant que de mortiers de 120 mm. Ces engins fabriqués par la société Nexter seront armés par les "bigors" (artilleurs de l'artillerie de marine). Le 11e Régiment d'artillerie de marine (11e RAMA) de la Lande d'Ouée, près de Rennes, utilisera quatre de ces engins au sein du GTIA Kapisa. Une centaine d'artilleurs de cette unité se trouvent actuellement sur les bases de Tagab et de Nijrab, et dans des OMLT. D'autres artilleurs du 3e RAMA sont actuellement en Afghanistan, sur la base Warehouse de Kaboul, pour réceptionner ces engins et ceux qui les suivront, et participer ensuite à leur mise en place. Par la suite, ils armeront deux Caesar au sein du Batfra. Les deux derniers engins resteront en réserve à Kaboul. Les deux unités de "bigors" appartiennent à deux brigades différentes : le 11e RAMA à la 9e brigade légère blindée de marine (9e BLBMa) de Nantes, et le 3e RAMA à la 6e brigade légère blindée (6e BLB) de Nîmes. Depuis le mois de janvier 2009, ces deux régiments travaillaient ensemble à préparer le déploiement des Caesar en Afghanistan. La puissance de feu des forces françaises s'accroît donc, puisque le week-end précédent un autre Antonov avait livré les trois premiers hélicoptères de combat Tigre mis en oeuvre par la France. Ce sera la première mission de combat pour cet appareil franco-allemand dont la conception remonte au début des années 1980.

Trois canons Caesar renforcent les Français en AfghanistanTrois canons Caesar renforcent les Français en Afghanistan
Trois canons Caesar renforcent les Français en Afghanistan
Repost 0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories