Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
10 avril 2013 3 10 /04 /avril /2013 16:25

Gripen EF Photo Stefan Kalm - saabgroup.com SKA0070 355x236

 

Apr. 10, 2013 - By ANDREW CHUTER – Defense News

 

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil — AEL-built avionics will be installed in the Brazilian version of the Gripen NG if the fast jet secures a deal to supply the Brazilian Air Force with a new fighter Saab, executives said Tuesday at the LAAD defense and security conference here.

 

Eddy de la Motta, the man leading Saab’s Gripen export drive, said AEL had been selected to supply displays, computers and other items in the event that the latest version of the Swedish fast jet wins the long-running FX-2 program.

 

The program to buy 36 fighters has been stalled by Brazilian economic developments, technology transfer and other issues.

 

The Gripen is in a three-way battle with Boeing’s F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet and Dassault Aviation’s Rafale for the deal.

 

La Motta said the inclusion of AEL avionics would create a separate standard of the under-development NG version of the aircraft already ordered by Sweden.

 

Switzerland has also selected the Gripen NG, but the purchase is subject to ratification by an upcoming referendum of voters there.

 

AEL is majority owned by Elbit of Israel. Embraer also has a 25 percent stake in a company, which has been heavily involved in providing avionics for recent Brazilian Air Force combat jet updates.

 

The Swedish executive took the opportunity during a briefing at LAAD to reiterate a financial offer on the FX-2 program that would allow the Brazilian government to not pay for the aircraft until the last machine had been delivered.

 

The payback period would run for 15 years after that, said the Saab executive.

 

In a separate development, Saab announced it had done a partnering deal with local Brazilian company Force Delta Equipamentos Militares for the part manufacture of multi-spectral camouflage for signature management.

Partager cet article
Repost0
5 avril 2013 5 05 /04 /avril /2013 07:25

kc390

 

Apr. 3, 2013 - By AARON MEHTA  - Defense News

 

In 2006, Embraer Defense & Security, Brazil’s largest defense company, earned $227 million in revenue. In 2012, it cleared $1 billion in revenue for the first time. That economic growth has mirrored the company’s emergence on the world stage, a presence the company is confident it can increase even as nations around the world cut defense spending.

 

With the U.S. Air Force selecting Embraer’s Super Tucano as the light air support (LAS) contract winner to supply Afghanistan with new turboprop combat planes, the company now has a foothold in America and eyes on worldwide expansion with its KC-390 transport plane. Defense News talked to company CEO Luiz Carlos Aguiar on March 14 as part of a company-sponsored trip to Brazil.

 

Q. You’ve talked about seeking out niche markets. How does the company target these and capitalize on them?

 

A. We have great experience doing that, not just on defense. On defense, we have a couple of examples, such as the [LAS contract]. When the Brazilian Air Force and Embraer designed these airplanes, it was designed for the Brazilian mission. Later, we found we had discovered a niche product for countries like Brazil that had challenges on their borders, trying to control the narco-traffic, drugs, arms and other things like that. The Philippines, Indonesia, even Central America, there is a great challenge to control the drugs there. The Brazilian Air Force had introduced a new aircraft, and later other air forces decided it was the right one to combat these kind of problems we have all over the world.

 

Another case is the patrol and surveillance aircraft based on the ERJ-145 [a civilian regional jet]. It’s a very cost-effective airplane. It is now being utilized by Mexico, by Greece, by India and others. It was again based on the Brazilian budget constraints.

 

Other countries have a lot of cuts and they need to have a surveillance system. For their missions, they don’t need to buy a larger airplane — they need something smaller. Once again, we found our niche for that.

 

Q. How is the KC-390 transport plane different from past products?

 

A. When we thought about this airplane, it was the first time we looked at the international market also, not just the Brazilian requirements. We balanced both needs. We saw the market first. We saw there were 2,000 old airplanes all over the world in more than 70 countries, very well spread out with a diversified base of potential customers. We looked at that and saw there was only one aircraft available in the market being produced and being delivered [the C-130].

 

We looked at the market and then came back to the Brazilian Air Force to talk with them about what they think about their cargo airplanes for the future. They said they were probably going to replace with more C-130s, and we started talking and showed them we were able to develop something in a very feasible way. It took two years working together to launch and sign the contract. It was a much more sophisticated process. We are on schedule, and I think we have a great chance to sell abroad.

 

Q. What other products do you have an eye on exporting?

 

A. When you look at the land side of it, we have the C4I capabilities with the company we just bought, Atech. We need to invest more money on that, we need to have more contracts to develop the technology, but there are capabilities already in place.

 

The radar company, Orbisat, once again has a chance in Brazil to produce and deliver [for Embraer’s border security system] Sisfron, and then we’ll have an economy of scale and a great chance to mature this product and export it also. We are focused on C4I, radars. And our bet is intelligence and communications.

 

Q. You’ve said you view the LAS contract as establishing the company in the American market. How do you expand?

 

A. We need to consolidate first and execute this program. We have a new company there, which is Embraer Defense & Security, incorporated in the U.S. We need to find someone who will manage it, a local, American executive to run this business for us. And then we’re going to write down a new business plan for America that, in my opinion, must include certain types of acquisitions. We need to think a little more about it.

 

First thing is getting there, executing this program [LAS], getting closer to increase our credibility with the end user. We are certain in this. But we want to take this opportunity to get to know our end user. We’re going to find and study the market.

 

Our main objective is two pillars: mobility and surveillance. These two operational capabilities are what we are focused on. Any type of acquisition, any type of project, will be under these two pillars.

 

We don’t want to go into armaments or other areas. Why? Because despite all of the budget constraints, these two areas need capabilities. Even in these specific areas, the budget in Europe or the U.S. might grow despite the fact the entire [defense] budget is shrinking.

 

Q. Are you worried about Beechcraft’s challenge to the LAS contract award?

 

A. No. The process was so robust. Senior people took control of the process. They have internal and external advisers. I think they did the right thing, they did it by the book, and they will prove that. It’s going to take some time, but I think this time we’re going to get there. We are ready to go right away in order to deliver on time, but we need to be patient and wait a little bit more, unfortunately.

 

Q. Could the Beechcraft challenge impact the timing of the contract?

 

A. I hope not. At this stage, it is very difficult to say something. [The U.S. Air Force] needs to [act] carefully so it does not open any gap in the process. That’s the way it is.

 

Unfortunately, our competitors are going downhill. They discontinued a lot of products that in the past were the champions of the market, and they tried to keep this as if it was their survival. They keep saying that they have the lower price. But mission capabilities, past performance and price, there are three variables and the [request for proposal] is quite clear on that. [USAF] took all of the information, put it inside their model, and then said who is the winner. That’s the way it is.

 

Q. Is Brazil’s long-delayed F-X fighter jet program coming soon, and what role will Embraer have?

 

A. I think Brazil is going to make this decision. It is time to make this decision. They have everything in place. All of the contenders have offered their offset programs. It’s more than mature enough to go ahead, in my opinion. I think it’s going to be in the next months, this year, I would say. Our role in that depends — I cannot tell any details — depends on who is going to win.

 

We have a memorandum of understanding with all three of the contenders. Each of them offers an offset program, but we prefer not declaring publicly our preference because we don’t want it to jeopardize the choice. It is a governmental decision, and we will respect that. Whatever they choose, we’re going to be in the process. They need to make this decision because Brazil needs that.

 

And it will have huge benefits for industry as well. There are new technologies, products and developments. There are opportunities for Embraer to leverage our current technology through the F-X. With the F-X, we can even go further in terms of technology, and even some new products could come up with one of these three contenders. That’s what I can tell you, I can’t go further than that.

 

Q. Did the decision to recompete the LAS competition hurt the chances of a U.S. company winning the F-X program?

 

A. There is no formal relation between the two programs. Formally. But goodwill is important. I couldn’t say that the [F/A-18 Super Hornet] is not going to be selected, but for sure, the way that [the initial LAS contract] happened in the United States — choosing a Brazilian aircraft, then canceling the contract, the way it happened — it caused some kind of bad blood, right? It’s a normal, human perception.

 

Q. But you don’t think there was long-term damage to the relationship between the two countries?

 

A. No, I don’t think so. Now, it is different. There are some steps that any competitor in the United States has the right to do. It doesn’t mean the [USAF] is canceling the contract; they are trying to keep our victory. One year ago, they looked at the process, saw some gaps, made a mistake and they canceled the contract. Now it’s different. They are trying to defend their choice. So far, so good. No problem at all with the relationship. It’s a part of the game there. That’s the way it is, there are rules and laws.

 

Q. What is next for Embraer?

 

A. We’re going to have a lot of new projects. And they are big. We’re talking about $20-25 billion in the next 10 years. If you look back, it started in 2008, when we had the new national defense strategy. After that, you had the mobility project with KC-390, the submarine project with the French company DCNS, the Sisfron.

 

In any society, you want to develop technology and protect yourself, because there are threats you didn’t have before. There are more things happening in Brazil right now, and we need to protect ourselves. There are high-level, added-value products we can develop and export. That’s our objective. We don’t see the maximum market as just selling in Brazil and continuing the process later. We try to focus where we can add value, build up a capability, and sell abroad. That’s the way it is.

 

COMPANY PROFILE

 

• 2012 revenue: $1.06 billion

• 2012 backlog: $3.4 billion

• Key businesses: Aerospace, border security, ISR and integrated solutions.

• Key markets: Latin America, Africa, Asia-Pacific

Source: Defense News research

 

———

 

Mehta reported from San Jose Dos Campos, Brazil.

Partager cet article
Repost0
3 avril 2013 3 03 /04 /avril /2013 16:50

http://www.actudefense.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/gripen-red-flag.jpg

Le Gripen suédois n’a été autorisé à participer qu’à des opérations de renseignement en

Libye. ©Forces armées suédoises / Lasse Jansson

 

03 avril 2013 par: Romain Mielcarek - ActuDéfense

 

La Libye a été la première opération aérienne de l’armée de l’air suédoise depuis le Congo en 1961. Cette mission a aussi été le baptême du feu du Gripen. Retour sur l’engagement du chasseur polyvalent de Saab.

 

Chauvinisme oblige, nous nous sommes beaucoup, en France, intéressés aux résultats du Rafale ou du Mirage en Libye. Ce théâtre d’opération a pourtant été le lieu d’une étrange rencontre entre trois chasseurs de dernière génération, concurrents sur quelques uns des principaux marchés des années à venir : le Rafale, l’Eurofighter et le Gripen. C’est sur le cas de ce dernier que nous allons nous pencher.

 

Le JAS 39 Gripen, en Libye, ce sont quelques 2000 heures de vol réalisées par huit appareils. Les Suédois ont participé en tout à 650 sorties au cours desquelles les pilotes se sont concentrés sur un effort de renseignement, réalisant près de 150 000 clichés. 140 militaires ont été mobilisés sur la base de Sigonella, en Sicile, directement aux côtés des Américains. L’engagement suédois a commencé le 8 avril et s’est terminé le 24 octobre 2011.

 

L’armée de l’air suédoise déployait pour la première fois depuis près de 50 ans des avions de combat sur un théâtre opérationnel. Elle ne l’avait pas fait depuis son intervention au Congo belge en 1961. La réactivité a été d’autant plus remarquable que les premiers équipages ont commencé à travailler moins d’une semaine après le vote favorable du Parlement, début avril 2011.

 

Pour le lieutenant-colonel Stefan Wilson, qui commande les forces aériennes, le bilan opérationnel est positif. Il insiste notamment sur la capacité des suédois à travailler au sein d’une coalition internationale, sous commandement de l’OTAN. En effet, si la Suède n’est pas membre de l’Alliance, elle est régulièrement amenée à travailler avec les armées de l’air de celle-ci. En Libye, c’est plus directement avec les Américains et les Danois qu’elle a collaboré. L’officier s’estime ainsi satisfait de l’usage fait des liaisons OTAN L16, sur lesquelles les Français ont eu quelques soucis, ainsi que de l’intégration dans la chaîne de commandement.

Panne d’essence

http://www.actudefense.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/gripen-suisse.jpg

Le Gripen suédois vole avec une catégorie de carburant civil qui demande quelques ajustements par rapport

au carburant militaire utilisé par les Américains. ©Saab Group

 

Tout n’a cependant pas été parfait. Les Suédois ont notamment souffert de leur incapacité à assurer leur propre soutien essence. Ils ont du pour cela compter sur les capacités de l’US Air Force … qui n’utilise pas le même combustible. Le temps d’ajouter les additifs nécessaires au gazole américain, les Suédois ont perdu quelques jours.

 

On pourrait aussi regretter de ne pas en avoir découvert plus sur les capacités du Gripen dans des missions de combat. L’avion suédois, dont le mandat parlementaire ne permettait que de faire de la reconnaissance, participait ici à sa première opération. Alors qu’il est sensé concurrencer, comme appareil multirôles, des engins comme le Rafale ou l’Eurofighter, il n’aura pas pu démontrer toutes ses possibilités.

 

Reste à observer les nombreux exercices aériens multinationaux auxquels participe l’avion de Saab. Les amateurs pourront regarder du côté du colossal Red Flag, organisé aux Etats-Unis, ou des plus modestes Loyal Arrow en Suède et Joint Warrior en Grande-Bretagne. Le tout en attendant l’intégration de la bombe à guidage laser GBU 39 et du missile Meteor … d’ici quelques années !

Partager cet article
Repost0
2 avril 2013 2 02 /04 /avril /2013 17:25

kc390

 

Apr. 2, 2013 by Stephen Trimble – FG

 

Washington DC - Two years can seem like a long time in the revitalised Brazilian defence market. While the lengthy delay to the air force's FX-2 fighter contract award receives most of the attention, the Brazilian military and the national defence industry have moved forward aggressively in key areas, revealing a new appreciation for taking national and regional security obligations more seriously.

 

Brazilian air force Hermes 450 UAV Brazilian air force

 Brazilian air force

The Hermes 450 is being adapted for local requirements

Perhaps the most telling example of this trend is the rapidly diversifying portfolio of Embraer Defense Systems. In 2012 alone, Embraer won a landmark border surveillance contract from the Brazilian army, formed a joint venture to manage satellite construction projects, publicly began contemplating a surprise entry into the shipbuilding industry, and - not least - posted a 24% increase in annual revenues, topping $1 billion in defence and security sales for the first time in the company's history.

The wide scope of those interests point in the direction of Embraer's evolution into Brazil's main prime contractor for a rapidly growing set of defence and security needs. It is a strategy likely to reshape the company's portfolio of products in the defence sector in less than a decade.

 

HEALTHY POTENTIAL

 

At the beginning of 2012, Embraer expected 75% of its defence revenues to come from four major programmes: development of the KC-390 transport and tanker; modernisation of AMX/A-1 and Douglas A-4 combat aircraft for the Brazilian air force and navy; the A-29/EMB-314 Super Tucano; and EMB-145-based P-99 and R-99 surveillance and command and control aircraft. It was a list with a healthy potential backlog and well within Embraer's comfort zone as an aircraft manufacturer.

 

By 2020, Embraer expects the fighter modernisation programmes and the P-99 and R-99 production lines to be gone, with the KC-390 and light attack aircraft to account for 43% of the defence company's overall revenues.

Meanwhile, revenues generated by several new business product lines, featuring Embraer as a border surveillance integrator, satellite construction manager, unmanned aerial vehicle maker and possibly even a shipbuilder, will contribute 42% of sales by the same point, according to its projections.

To be fair, Embraer had dabbled in the systems integration business in the past. It created an air operations centre for Mexico, which connected to the nation's EMB-145-based airborne early warning and control system aircraft. It had also participated in the creation of the Brazilian air force's system for the surveillance of the Amazon (SIVAM), but as a subcontractor to Raytheon.

 

There were no system integrators in Brazil when the SIVAM programme was awarded in the mid-1990s, as the country was in the midst of a near two-decade reduction in defence spending.

National priorities have shifted in the past decade, however, as Brazil has embraced a larger role on the regional and world stages and discovered a new wealth of oil and natural gas deposits within its maritime borders in the South Atlantic.

 

NEW LAW AIMED AT SOURCING WITHIN BORDERS 

Foreign defence companies have been doing well in Brazil. With rising security needs and a small defence industrial base, the nation has been forced to go beyond its borders to buy military hardware.

That is why Brazil's new submarines come from France, its newest ocean patrol vessels come from the UK and its new fighter will be acquired from France, Sweden or the USA; the latter in a competition between the Rafale, Gripen E and Lockheed Marting F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

But a new law passed in 2012 seeks to change Brazil's reliance on foreign companies for major weapons systems. Public law 12.598 establishes a new category for a "strategic defence company", of which at least 60% of the shares are owned by Brazilians.

It is not the first time a government has leveraged its defence budget to incentivise or protect a domestic industry. The US defence industry is shielded from some foreign competitors by the Buy American Act and the Berry Amendment.

Brazil's new law does not prohibit foreign companies from competing on military hardware or services bids, but it does make it harder for them to win. Instead, the law exempts strategic defence companies from Brazil's tax on industrial goods, and frees them from obligations to contribute to unemployment insurance and social security programmes.

The move appears partly aimed at countering the foreign defence companies that have been buying ownership stakes in Brazilian defence companies.

"There is no prohibition for someone who is a multinational company, but they are not to be eligible for the benefits of being a strategic defence company," says Luiz Carlos Aguiar, chief executive of Embraer Defence Systems.

The programme has already caused a minor restructuring within the defence industrial base. Two years ago, Embraer formed the Harpia Systems joint venture with Elbit Systems subsidiary AEL Sistemas, with equal ownership by both companies. As a result of the new law, former Embraer rival Avibras agreed to buy 10% of Elbit's stake in the joint venture, increasing the number of shares owned by the Brazilian firms to 60%.

Defence spending remains at a modest 1.6% of gross domestic product, but the country's rising economic output means spending has risen proportionately. Overall spending peaked in 2012 at $36 billion, of which about $5.16 billion was set aside for investments split between the three armed services.
 

"That's above what we had last year," says Luiz Carlos Aguiar, chief executive of Embraer Defense Systems. "There are some important programmes they have been reducing because they are finalising, and they are being replaced by others. That's why I believe we have space to grow in Brazil. Out of this $5 billion, Embraer, as a group, have 27%."

If that level of spending is sustained Brazil will be buying much more than new fighters and KC-390s during the next decade. The military is seeking to modernise its inventories of combat and support equipment, while introducing a wide-ranging surveillance network over the country's porous south-eastern border and territorial waters.

 

Indeed, Brazil's ambitions grew so large it appeared to briefly force Embraer on the defensive, as the promise of lucrative systems-integration contracts energised new competitors from the country's construction companies. Salvador-based Odebrecht formed an alliance with European prime contractor and EADS subsidiary Cassidian to compete for the border surveillance contract. Another Brazilian construction firm, Synergy Group, teamed up with Israel Aerospace Industries to pursue the same work.

In the end, the Brazilian army awarded the $400 million contract to Embraer in November 2012 to launch phase one of the system for the surveillance of the frontiers (SISFRON) contract.

 

The award appeared to deflate the hopes of Embraer's erstwhile competitors. Follow-on awards for SISFRON are still available and the Brazilian navy plans to launch a similar programme next year, but the Odebrecht/Cassidian joint venture has reportedly been dissolved in the aftermath of losing the army contract.

 

ACHIEVING PRIMACY

 

Instead, Embraer appears to have secured its new role as the Brazilian military's most important prime contractor, with billions of dollars in new programmes waiting on the books.

With the KC-390 already headed for series production, Embraer Defense Systems looks set to continue on a seven-year growth trend, including the defence unit that existed before the standalone company was formed. Defence sales accounted for only $227 million of Embraer's revenues in 2006, but nearly quintupled to more than $1.05 billion in 2012.

 

As a percentage of the company's overall revenues, the share claimed by the defence unit has nearly tripled to 17%, even as Embraer has introduced the Phenom 100 and 300 business jets to its product line-up.

 

The key for Embraer now will be executing on the SISFRON programme. It has only received the phase-one award, but the overall programme is valued at $4 billion during the next decade. The system is going to create a network of border surveillance stations, with ground-based radars, UAV sensors and command and control systems networked together to identify and catch smugglers crossing the open border.

 

Brazilian air force P-3 & F-5 Brazilian air force

 Brazilian air force

The fleet of the Brazilian air force includes Lockheed P-3 special-mission aircraft and Northrop F-5 fighters

 

"Until March we are going to finalise all of the subcontractors on the SISFRON contract," says Aguiar. "We have a deadline by the end of March, and we are in the process right now. We have already implemented our office. We have a physical office separated from Embraer in Campinas. It is a city close by Sao Paulo, close by Orbisat, which is part of the consortium."

 

Orbisat, which is partially owned by Embraer, is providing the ground-based radar for the phase-one pilot programme. Meanwhile, Atech, another Brazilian contractor partly owned by Embraer, will supply the command and control equipment.

 

The second phase of the contract is expected to be awarded in 2014, and it is not guaranteed it will be given to Embraer. "It depends on our performance," Aguiar says. "If we do the right thing they will hire us again."

 

STRATEGIC ACQUISITION

 

SISFRON's second phase is likely to usher in the use of operational UAVs in regular Brazilian military operations. Embraer anticipated the need and formed a joint venture with Elbit Systems-owned subsidiary AEL Sistemas, which is adapting the Israeli manufacturer's Hermes 450 for Brazilian requirements. In January, Avibras also acquired a 10% stake in the Harpia Systems joint venture, which adds the Falcao UAV to the product mix.

 

Although the SISFRON phase-two effort will be managed by the army, Harpia is waiting on developments with the Brazilian air force, which is charged with setting overall unmanned air system requirements for all three branches of the military.

 

"They are designing the requirements for the UAS," Aguiar said in January. "This is going to become public probably two or three months from now, and then we are going to participate and make our proposal to develop this new configuration UAV through Harpia."

 

Embraer has projected a market in Brazil worth $1 billion during the decade for new UAVs alone. The company has also invested an ownership stake in Santos Labs, which makes small UAVs, and signed a licence agreement with Boeing Insitu.

 

"It is good not having a UAV in the first phase of SISFRON because it's going to give us a bit of time to develop," Aguiar says.

 

Another market possibly worth more than $1 billion to Embraer in the next decade is Brazil's nascent satellite industry. In 2012, Embraer formed Visiona, a joint venture with national telecommunications company Telebras, to manage a growing requirement for earth observation and communications relay satellites over Brazil. Visiona is evaluating the selection of manufacturers for the satellites and the command and control systems.

 

"After that we're going to be responsible for signing the contract with the insurance company and the launching company," Aguiar says. "To integrate those parts, I think we have a chance to learn from this experience in order to add value for the second, the third and the fourth satellites that Brazil, for sure, will need in the future."

 

KC-390 SET FOR DOMESSTIC VOTE OF CONFIDENCE

 

The Brazilian air force is likely to announce a firm order for Embraer's KC-390 tactical transport and tanker at the Latin American Aerospace and Defence (LAAD) trade show in Rio de Janeiro in April, analysts say.

 

The aircraft completed its critical design review on 22 March, which means Embraer can release engineering drawings to the factory floor in preparation for building and flying the first KC-390 in the second half of 2014. If all goes well, series production will start in 2016, with deliveries starting the same year.

 

Brazil, which is paying more than $2 billion to develop the KC-390, has so far only signed a letter of intent to purchase 28 of the aircraft. Securing a firm order would be a vote of confidence from the KC-390's domestic market, and provide a significant boost to Embraer's sales campaigns to secure further international commitments for the new aircraft.

In many ways, the KC-390 is Brazil's halo product that the rising economic colossus hopes will herald its arrival on to the international defence market.

 

In addition to its home market, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic and Portugal have also signed letters of intent for a further 32 KC-390s. Colombia says it will buy 12 aircraft, while Argentina, Chile and Portugal are expected to order six each. The Czech Republic is also expected to buy two jets.

 

Rebecca Edwards, an analyst at Forecast International, says Embraer hopes to convert these commitments into a total of 60 firm orders by the end of 2013.

 

Embraer KC-390 Embraer

 Brazilian air force

Embraer completed the critical design-review of the tactical transport and tanker on 22 march

Embraer estimates the medium-lift transport market is worth $50 billion during the next 10-15 years, which could mean a total of 700 orders up for grabs. While Lockheed Martin's C-130J Hercules currently dominates that market, Edwards says Embraer could seize a significant portion of those sales. "The KC-390 is going to pursue sales as the C-130 replacement, a market of considerable size and potential," she says. "Granted, the KC-390 will not be the only competition, but it can be expected to win a good portion of the market. Based on this information, Forecast International anticipates unit production to reach 98 aircraft by 2021 and as high as 234 by 2027."
 

Indeed, Embraer admits the Lockheed-built tactical transport is its chief rival, even though it was not the company's original intent to compete head-to-head.

Richard Aboulafia, an analyst at the Teal Group, says it is certainly possible that Embraer could sell anywhere from 150 to 200 aircraft, but that is assuming the US market remains closed to Embraer. Teal's forecast calls for a more gradual ramp up of the KC-390 line, with 25 aircraft being built by 2021. Aboulafia says Embraer's projection for a potential market of 700 aircraft is roughly on target, but much of that is locked-up by the USA.

 

Edwards says many of Embraer's sales will come in the Latin American and African markets, where the USA has comparatively less political clout. Political muscle is a huge factor in military aircraft sales, Aboulafia adds, but Embraer could compete by offering a "really good" aircraft at low prices. However, the challenge will be to hold the KC-390's price down at around the $50 million level. "There are all kinds of reasons to prefer a C-130J, but what they're really going for is value for money for a really good cargo box," Aboulafia says. "They're going to find a niche here."

 

Paulo Gastao Silva, Embraer vice-president for the KC-390 programme, says the aircraft is "on track" to meet its cost targets, projected at between $2.3-2.4 billion. In fact, there has been a slight drop of about $42 million in the projected development cost for the transport, he says.

 

Gastao Silva's figures do not quite match up with earlier cost projections, originally budgeted at $1.3 billion, according to a Teal Group report. The report projects the aircraft's development costs would increase by $2 billion to $3 billon, which seems to have at least partially borne out.

 

One factor which could drive up prices is that the Brazilian government has mandated the use of as many local suppliers as possible, depriving programme managers of the ability to choose the best components at the lowest possible cost, Aboulafia says. Local subsystems tend to cost more than their international counterparts because of economies of scale and development costs. "It's not a killer, it's just something that hobbles designers, especially when they're trying to keep costs down," he says.

 

But the KC-390 does have significant advantages over its Lockheed-built competitor in that it is a much newer design which incorporates new technologies such as fly-by-wire, Edwards says. The Brazilian aircraft carries a 23t payload, which exceeds the roughly 21t carrying capability of the C-130J. Additionally, the KC-390, powered by twin International Aero Engines V2500 turbofans, is also 100kt (185km/h) faster than the Lockheed type, with a cruise speed of 465kt.

Gastao Silva says the KC-390 is being designed specifically to operate from austere semi-prepared airstrips. He adds that the aircraft can make 10 passes on a fully unpaved runway before the landing strip is rendered useless.

 

But while choosing the V2500 was a good move because it is a proven airliner engine with a huge installed base on the Airbus A320 fleet, turbofan engines may actually hinder the KC-390's appeal as a tactical transport, particularly for special missions, Aboulafia says. "For this size class, that's assuming more of a cargo mission rather than a special operations," he says. "It also assumes more developed airfields rather than improvised or rough ones."

 

One of the questions that must be answered about Embraer's claims pertaining to the KC-390's improvised airfield capabilities is what kind of payload the jet will be able to carry when operating from unpaved strips, Aboulafia says. There is also the ever-present danger of foreign object damage to the engines, which is less of a problem on turboprop-powered aircraft.

 

Additionally, some users prefer turboprops for low-altitude missions because they are much more fuel-efficient when operating in those flight regimes, Aboulafia says. "At low altitude there's nothing like a prop but, moreover, the quad-engined C-130 has more redundancy for those kinds of operations, which many potential users prefer. If you're doing more cargo or longer-range, jets are just fine, that's why the [Boeing] C-17 does just fine with turbofans," Aboulafia says.

 

Time will tell if Brazil and the KC-390 will be able take on Lockheed and the political muscle of the USA, securing a niche for itself. In any case, the KC-390 should prove to be a remarkable achievement once it completes its development cycle and enters into service.

Partager cet article
Repost0
2 avril 2013 2 02 /04 /avril /2013 05:55
Altantique 2 : futur bombardier ?

30.03.2013 Le Fauteuil de Colbert

 

L'Atlantic en service depuis 10 décembre 1965

 

L'Atlantique 2 est le successeur du BR. 1150 Atlantic. Ce dernier était le vainqueur d'un concours OTAN. Cet appareil initialement conçu pour la patrouille maritime à dominante ASM a connu la guerre aéroterrestre de l'opération Tacaud au Tchad (1978) jusqu'à l'opération Serval (2013). 

 

La Marine nationale reçoit 28 exemplaires de 1989 à 1997. Ceux-ci remplacent alors les appareils survivants de la commande française d'Atlantic (20 puis 40 machines commandées).

L'Atlantique 2 affiche une autonomie maximale de 18 heures, soit 4300 nautiques franchissables. Long de 31.7 mètres pour une envergure de 37.5 mètres, ils affichent une masse maximale de 46 tonnes (25 à vide).

 

Un camion à munitions

 

La soute de l'ATL2 peut embarquer soit :

Il est un outil indispensable en matière de lutte ASM, notamment en matière de protection des sous-marins stratégiques au large de Brest, cet avion embarque également des bouées acoustiques. C'est pourquoi la modernisation continue, et notamment la prochaine qui doit être réalisée, qui recevra notamment un nouveau radar AESA dérivé de celui du Rafale, intéresse particulièrement la crédibilité de la FOST.

 

A l'heure actuelle, les ATL2 français sont répartis entre les flottilles 21F et 23 F de Lann-Bihoué. Mais de ces machines il y en a également qui sont régulièrement déployés en Afrique :

http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/551501_496474883731575_994546380_n.jpg© Inconnu.

 

Depuis 2008 un bombardier

 

En juillet 2008, l'hebdomadaire Air & Cosmos révéle que l'Atlantique 2 a été qualifié pour pouvoir embarquer des GBU-12 de 250 kg. Cependant, la frégate volante n'est pas autonome car elle ne possède aucune capacité de ciblage propre pour désigner les cibles. C'est donc par l'entremise d'un autre appareil, emportant une nacelle de désignation laser, ou par l'intermédiaire d'un contrôleur aérien avancé au sol qu'il peut délivrer ses munitions.

 

Plateforme C4ISR armée

 

Les Atlantique 2 sont capables de tenir l'air jusqu'à 14 heures. Si ces appareils devaient agir à la manière d'un système de drones MALE, ils seraient capable d'offrir une permanence sur zone avec 4 vecteurs. Ses moyens de détection (radar Iguane, boule optronique IR/IL, moyens d’écoute, transmission de données, postes d’observation nichés dans la cellule) sont aussi utiles à la patrouille maritime qu'aux missions ISR en milieu terrestre.

 

Capacité unique des Armées françaises, ce bombardier sert de PC volant (d'où le choix du Fauteuil de lui affubler la notion de plateforme C4ISR). Raison pour laquelle l'appareil avait reçu la délégation d'ouverture du feu pendant l'opération Harmattan. En effet, les équipages de ces "frégates volantes" sont constitués d'une vingtaine de membres. Ils sont des spécialistes de la détection mais surtout des habitués de ces opérations. C'est pourquoi ces machines sont dotées d'une "capacité de réflexion, d’analyse et de compréhension de l’environnement, qu’il peuvent partager avec l’état-major et les autres moyens engagés. Une valeur ajoutée que ne peut par exemple pas offrir un drone aérien" (Mer et Marine, 23 janvier 2013). 

 

L'ATL2 a été un élément fondamental de la manoeuvre aéroterrestre de l'opérartion Serval. Mieux encore, il a été un accélérateur des manoeuvres tactiques des unités terrestres grâce à ses qualités qui lui permettent de collecter du renseignement, l'analyser et le transformer en informations utiles pour cibler des objectifs pour d'autres plateformes (comme des Mirage 2000D et des Rafale), mais aussi pour diriger les unités au sol. Sans lui, le déploiement de l'Armée française n'aurait peut être pas été aussi efficace.

C'est une capacité véritablement unique que ne peut offrir ni des "bombardiers purs" (comme les B-1B Lancer équipés d'une nacelle Sniper) ou une armada de systèmes de drones MALE armés.

Atteindrait-on un Graal de la fusion des données au service du commandement de la manoeuvre ?

 

Un bombardier à autonomiser

 

Reste à conférer une capacité de désignation laser à ce PATMAR. La solution pourrait venir d'une expérimentation financée par une urgence opération (ne serait-ce pas de cette manière là que l'Atlantic a connu Tacaud en 1978) pour emporter l'équipement nécessaire (c'est comme cela que quelques ATL2 ont reçu leur nouvelle boule optronique).

 

Il est presque étonnant que l'utilisation d'une nacelle de désignation laser, comme la nacelle Damoclès qui équipe Rafale et Mirage, n'ait pas été essayée à bord des Atlantique 2 (alors qu'il possède des pylones sous les ailes).

 

Des munitions d'appui-feu

 

En dehors des hélicoptères qui peuvent ou emportent des munitions anti-chars ou anti-personnels. A contrario, les voilures fixes sont presque exclusivement pourvues en munitions "lourdes". Ces dernières ont été développées en vue de détruire des formations de blindées et de gros point durcis. La capacité en bombes des ATL2 est assez limitée : il s'agit au maximum de huit GBU-12 de 250 kg.

 

Depuis le début de la guerre en Afghanistan (2001), il s'est avéré que ces munitions étaient peu proportionnées par rapport aux objectifs à détruire. Depuis l'Asie centrale jusqu'en Afrique, c'est effectivement trop pour traiter des formations légères faiblement protégées. Qui plus est, cela limite la liberté d'action pour délivrer le feu quand il s'agit, aussi, d'éviter les dommages collatéraux.

Bien des initiatives ont été développées depuis ces dernières années, et même parfois depuis bien longtemps avant. Il y va des roquettes Hydra en passant par les réflexions sur les bombes sans charge explosive. L'effet cinétique de l'impact suffirait. La gamme des bombes JDAM a vu le développement d'une bombe de 113 kg. L'AASM français peut être développé en bombes de 125 kg.

 

Mais le vrai catalyseur de cette tendance aura été le développement de la gigantesque flotte de drones MALE armés des forces armées américaines, et même d'une de leurs agences de renseignement (CIA). Dans un premier temps, les Predator et les Reaper emportaient les munitions des hélicoptères. Mais dans un second temps, ce sont des munitions adaptées aux drones qui ont été developpées.

 

Il reste à faire rentrer l'Atlantique 2 dans la boucle. Avec sa soute de 3600 kg de charge maximale, l'appareil pourrait emporter :

  • 28 AASM (version 125 kg),
  • 80 Hellfire.

Ces deux chiffres ne sont que le résultat d'un calcul trop simple (charge maximale de la soute divisée par le poids de la munition visée) qui ne tient même pas compte du volume des armes ou des contingences techniques. C'est un peu de "pub'" pour exhiber un potentiel à modeler. Cependant, le potentiel est flagrant, l'éventuelle réalité serait moindre. Mais même en panachant les deux munitions, il y a de quoi traiter bien des cibles...

 

http://ardhan.pagesperso-orange.fr/aeronefs/79sept%20ATL%20PC%20Barracuda.jpg© Inconnu. Atlantic et Jaguar pendant Tacaud (1978).

 

Entre plateforme de tir à distance de sécurité...

 

Il s'agit également d'imaginer une réponse à :

  • ce que les américains nomment la stratégie A2AD (Anti-Access Area-Denial),
  • de suppression des défenses aériennes ennemies,
  • ou plus simplement de pouvoir traiter des cibles à distance de sécurité (tir en "stand-off").

N'importe quel vecteur aérien est susceptible d'être contré par des moyens anti-aériens adverses. Les guerres de Libye et du Mali se sont faites au regard de cette menace. Si les chasseurs-bomardiers (Rafale, Mirage 2000D et Super Etendard Modernisés) éliminent généralement ces menaces, quand ce n'est pas par d'autres moyens, alors des appareils comme l'Atlantique 2 peuvent agir dans une sécurité relative.

 

Entre parenthèse, la capacité des Atlantique 2 à se protéger des munitions anti-aériennes est cruciale, même pour la lutte ASM. Les allemands ont ouvert la voie avec le développement du missile IDAS qui permet à un sous-marin en plongée d'agresser des hélicoptères et des avions de patrouille maritime. La France suit avec la solution des Mistral ensilotés par trois dans un mât et le lancement de missiles Mica dans un véhicule sous-marin dédié. Les américains suivraient avec une telle solution pour l'AIM-9 Sidewinder.

 

C'est pourquoi des munitions tirés à distance de sécurité ont été conçus. L'AASM appartient à cette catégorie d'armes. Mais il y a également le missile de croisière Scalp (1300 kg, peut être deux munitions dans une soute d'ATL2) qui permet de donner une allonge à son porteur supérieure à 250 km. C'est une munition relativement coûteuse (comme le sera le Scalp naval/MdCN) mais efficace. Elle aurait peut être sa place dans certains scénarios d'engagement de l'ATL2.

 

...et mise en oeuvre d'un réseau

 

Comme toute frégate (même volante), l'Atlantique 2 est susceptible de " marsupialisation". C'est-à-dire qu'il peut mettre en oeuvre des capteurs et effecteurs déportés. Quelque part, c'est ce qu'il fait déjà en matière de lutte ASM avec le largage de bouées sonars actives ou passives reliées par liaison au lanceur. Mais la marsupialisation n'aurait pas encore été mise en oeuvre en combat aéroterrestre.

 

Akram Ghulam nous donne une description générique des loitering munitions dans une étude du RUSI : " Loitering Munition(LM), which may be defined as a low cost artillery-launched precision munition that can be positioned in the airspace for a significant time and rapidly attack an appropriate land target". Il s'agit donc de munitions dont les premiers spécimens sont un hybride entre un missile de croisière et un drone. 

 

Le  Fire Shadow (4 mètres pour 200 kg), de MBDA, a par exemple une autonomie de 6 heures et une portée de 100 km. Ce drone ISR consommable peut se servir de sa charge de combat pour détruire une cible.

 

Il ne serait pas inintéressant d'imaginer, et pourquoi pas d'expérimenter ?, le couplage d'un Atlantique 2 à de telles munitions. La surface couverte par l'avion serait décuplée. En effet, celui-ci pourrait "déléguer" la surveillance d'un point particulier du théâtre à un de ces drones consommables pendant quelques heures.

 

Mieux encore, les troupes au sol pourraient même s'appuyer directement sur la munition larguée par l'ATL2 :

  • soit en recevant les données,
  • soit en en prenant directement le contrôle.

 

Dans cette configuration, l'ATL2 renforce son rôle de PC Volant et va et vient aux points clefs du théâtre où il est besoin d'autre chose qu'un simple support aérien de surveillance.

 

Quel vivier d'appareils ?

 

Actuellement, la Marine nationale espère que 18 à 22 machines (sur les 28 reçues, moins une qui a été trop endommagée) seront modernisées afin de demeurer au niveau suffisant pour œuvrer au service de la FOST (lutte ASM), à la reconnaissance maritime et aux attaques aéronavales.

 

Mais il est évident pour toutes les Armées que l'Atlantique 2 est devenue un élément essentiel de la manoeuvre aéroterrestre française. A croire que l'appareil remplace le vide laissé vacant par les Cougar HORIZON. Peut être est-ce même une capacité unique au sein de l'OTAN. 

 

C'est pourquoi, au regard des perspectives d'évolution de l'appareil et de ses qualités de plateforme C4ISR armé, l'évolution pourrait être portée à son paroxysme. C'est-à-dire que les appareils qui ne seraient pas modernisés pour la Marine pour servir directement à l'Armée de Terre. Il y aurait de quoi constituer 3 systèmes de trois ATL2 (soit autant que ce qui est espéré avec le nouveau système de drones intérimaires). Il faudrait débarquer tout ce qui sert à la lutte ASM et qui ne servira plus. Et adapter définitivement les avions au combat aéroterrestre. Mieux encore, les appareils pourraient être plus rapidement disponibles que d'autres vecteurs espérés.

 

Quelque part, la Marine nationale pourrait être soulagée d'avoir à diviser sa flotte d'Atlantique 2 en deux. Un groupe se spécialiserait définitivement dans les missions purement navales quand ce serait la spécialisation dans les missions purement terrestres. Il reste aussi la possibilité de prendre une, deux ou trois machines pour mener des opérations de guerre électronique ou de renseignement électromagnétique. C'est ce que les allemands ont fait de leurs derniers ATL2.

 

L'idée se heurte au mur du manque de budgets pour des expérimentations nouvelles. Le financement de l'adaptation de ces machines à la guerre aéroterrestre dépasse de loin le périmètre de la Marine. En plus, est-ce que le besoin en drones MALE est si urgent face au potentiel tryptique ATL2/munitions d'appui feu rapproché/drones consommables ?

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mars 2013 1 25 /03 /mars /2013 17:50

C-27J – photo1 Alenia Aermacchi

Italian air force types including the C-27J will receive

ELT-572 DIRCM installations

 

Mar. 25, 2013 by Arie Egozi – FG

 

Tel Aviv - Work to install Elbit Systems C-Music directed infrared countermeasures (DIRCM) equipment on several Italian air force types is to begin soon, under the terms of a $15 million contract awarded to industry partner Elettronica in 2011.

 

Dan Slasky, vice-president of airborne electro-optics and laser systems at Elbit's Elop division, says the Italian air force will first install Elettronica's ELT-572 self-protection system onto its Lockheed Martin C-130J and Alenia Aermacchi C-27 tactical transports and AgustaWestland AW101 helicopters.

 

The integration work is to begin following a series of "very successful" tests performed by the Italian air force, Slasky adds.

 

Based on the use of advanced fibre laser technology, the Music system counters man-portable air defence systems by emitting a laser beam towards an approaching missile's seeker head, causing it to veer off course. Elbit says the open-architecture technology can be installed on any type of aircraft, with existing customers including operators of military, commercial and VIP-transport aircraft.

 

"There is a growing demand for the systems for protecting cargo and aerial refuelling aircraft. Each month we respond to at least one request for proposals," Slasky says, citing a "real and imminent" threat posed by shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles. However, integrating such equipment with commercial airliners remains a "complex issue", he adds.

 

Slasky also reveals that negotiations are taking place about potentially installing Music-series countermeasures equipment on aircraft for four Boeing customers. The US airframer and Elbit earlier this year signed a collaboration agreement enabling the former to offer different versions of the DIRCM technology with its fixed-wing and helicopter product ranges.

 

Boeing's Military Aircraft and Network & Space Systems organisations are working together to integrate the systems on to new and existing aircraft, as well as providing signature analysis and end-to-end services and support for the equipment.

Partager cet article
Repost0
15 mars 2013 5 15 /03 /mars /2013 12:40

Il-476 transport plane

 

15 March 2013 airforce-technology.com

 

Ilyushin Aviation Complex has postponed the initial test flight of the Russian Air Force's Il-76MD-90A heavy transport aircraft, due to adverse meteorological conditions, a company spokeswoman has revealed.

 

The spokeswoman was quoted by RIA Novosti as saying that all preparations were completed, but the test flight had to be cancelled because of heavy snowfall.

 

Noting that the adverse weather is expected to continue for the next three days, the spokeswoman did not provide any details about a new schedule.

 

The test flight was set to be conducted from the Zhukovsky flight test centre near Moscow, Russia, according to the Russian Defence Ministry's original programme, which includes a series of 22 test flights.

 

Data obtained from each test flight is expected to be collected and analysed by experts, to make any necessary enhancements to the aircraft, which is also known as the Il-476.

 

The aircraft successfully carried out its first 25 minute prolonged test flight at the company's aviation complex in Ulyanovsk, Russia, in February 2013.

 

An upgraded variant of the Il-76 airlifter, the Il-476 features a new glass cockpit, advanced avionics, on-board communication and navigation systems, fully-digital flight control system, as well as four Aviadvigatel PS-90 high-bypass turbofan engines to reduce fuel consumption.

 

Displaying a modernised wing-construction, the aircraft is also capable of transporting up to 50t of cargo, which is 20% greater than its predecessor, while cruising at speeds of 850km/h.

 

A total of 39 aircraft were ordered by the Russian Defence Ministry from United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) under a RUB140bn ($4.5bn) contract in October 2012 to help replace the Il-76 multipurpose aircraft fleet.

 

Initial aircraft will be shipped in 2014, while the remaining deliveries are scheduled to be completed by 2020.

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2013 4 14 /03 /mars /2013 17:45

http://www.defenceweb.co.za/images/stories/AIR/Air_new/c130_za4_400x300.JPG

 

14 March 2013 by Kim Helfrich- defenceWeb

 

The South African Air Force’s (SAAF) only dedicated airlift unit, based at AFB Waterkloof, marks its 70th anniversary in June. At the same time it will also mark the 50th year of service of the venerable Hercules C-130BZ with the SAAF.

 

The third number that will be commemorated is 100, to mark the centenary of Lockheed Martin, the US aerospace company responsible for the design and manufacture of the C-130, now in its J model.

 

Immediately after being formed at Almaza, Egypt, on June 1, 1943, 28 Squadron was split into two, with A Flight based at Castel Benito in Italy and B Flight based at Ras-el-Ma in Morocco, both operating Avro Ansons, according to the Unofficial SAAF website.

 

By August that year Wellingtons and Dakotas had joined the fleet. The squadron also operated detachments in Sicily and Algeria and it was only at the end of the war in Europe that the squadron consolidated operations at Maison Blanche, Algeria.

 

In September 1945 the squadron returned to South Africa and was based at AFB Swartkop from where it shuttled South African troops home from North Africa and Europe (the “Springbok Shuttle”) during 1945 and early 1946 using Dakotas. At this time, they also operated the Anson, DH Rapide and a single Avro York.

 

VIP flights were an important part of 28 Squadrons taskings, with various Dakotas and Venturas fitted out with improved accommodation. From 22 September 1948 to 25 September 1949, two contingents participated in the Berlin Airlift, flying Royal Air Force aircraft. In 1949, nine De Havilland Devons were added to the VIP fleet followed by De Havilland Herons in 1955, while the York was disposed of in 1952. When the Dakota could no longer be used to fly VIPs to Europe, a Viscount was acquired in 1958.

 

Seven C-130B Hercules were acquired in 1963 and when the squadron moved to AFB Waterkloof it left its Dakotas behind to join 44 Squadron at Swartkop. In February 1968 the VIP flight was reconstituted as 21 Squadron (taking with it the Viscount), while the C-160Z Transall was acquired in 1969 and operated with the squadron from January 1970 until they retired in 1993. Three ex-US Navy C-130F aircraft were acquired in 1996, with a further two ex-US Air Force C-130Bs following in 1998. The F models were only flown for a short period before being retired, but the squadron continues to fly the nine C-130B Hercules all upgraded to C-130BZ configuration.

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2013 4 14 /03 /mars /2013 17:45

http://www.defenceweb.co.za/images/stories/AIR/C-130J_Frans_Dely_400x300.jpg

Picture: Frans Dely/Lockheed Martin

 

14 March 2013 by Kim Helfrich - defenceweb.co.za

 

It could be termed “a call to action” or even a friendly warning but the meaning is clear – unless those tasked with planning for the equipment needs of the SA Air Force (SAAF) don’t start now, the country is going to find itself grounded when it comes to airlift.

 

The SAAF maintains it can operate its ageing fleet of C-130BZ Hercules until 2020 but this doesn’t mean work on replacing these venerable workhorses shouldn’t start now. This is the view of Dennys Plessas, Lockheed Martin Vice President Business Development Initiatives, Europe, Middle East and Africa.

 

“A start has to be made on planning to replace the BZs,” he told journalists in Pretoria this week.

 

He acknowledged the South African defence budget, in common with many western countries, was under “extreme stress”. He noted that at a cost of between R693 and R780 million for the basic aircraft, it would be better to look at acquisition “sooner rather than later”.

 

With timeframes for delivery of up to five years from the date of initial contractual agreement to acquire new aircraft, this certainly makes sense. Plessas pointed out that fine-tuning of contracts and all documentation could take up to a year.

 

“When this, along with actual build time, fitting of customer specific requirements and testing is taken into account, there is not really too much time left for the SAAF to start serious work on the C-130BZ replacements.”

 

The SAAF C-130s are operated by 28 Squadron at AFB Waterkloof and this year notch up a remarkable 50 years of service. This Plessas sees as not only a tribute to the flying and maintenance skills of the SAAF and the maintenance and repair abilities of Denel Aviation but also the ruggedness of the aircraft.

 

“It has proven itself as a willing workhorse all over the world and has, over the years, been adapted to any number of missions.”

 

It’s origin as a pure airlifter has been boosted by the addition of mission capabilities including air-to-air refuelling, VIP passenger transport, firefighting, maritime patrol and reconnaissance, paradropping and even an armed version.

 

Airlift and maritime patrol are two red light areas of operation facing the SAAF and Plessas believes the C-130J can do these jobs as well as others.

 

“This would eliminate the need to acquire extra platforms and because the SAAF is a long-time user of the C-130, at least half the infrastructure needed for new Lockheed Martin platforms is already in place. I see an almost seamless transition to the C-130J if the planners decide it is the most suitable platform.”

 

This was further borne out by William Swearengen, Air Mobility Systems Studies Principal at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.

 

He and his team have completed a number of studies pertaining to the use of the C-130J by the SAAF. These include maritime patrols and air-to-air refuelling.

 

Working from AFB Waterkloof, the new generation airlifters, when suitably equipped, could refuel 2 Squadron Gripens on sorties across the continent. They could also provide full coverage, using a single aircraft, of South Africa’s exclusive economic zone and its priority fishing areas also from Waterkloof, obviating the need to duplicate facilities for maintenance at either AFB Ysterplaat or Port Elizabeth.

 

These studies show the latest generation Hercules will be a true multi-mission platform and when the possible inclusion of high-tech passenger capsules is added, the C-130J can be tasked in yet another area of operations the SAAF is battling to fill adequately.

 

Both Plessas and Swearengen point out the modular system of roll-on/roll-off components for different missions do not all have to be done at once.

 

“These are all already in service and development costs have been paid by the US Air Force. This means no extra cost and with all the necessary fitment options already on the C-130J they can be acquired as need and finance dictate adding more value to the multi-mission role of the aircraft,” they said.

 

28 Squadron has nine C-130BZs on its inventory to fulfil tasks ranging from logistic support for SA National Defence Force continental peacekeeping and peace support operations, humanitarian operations, support to the landward force, and general airlift. Indications are three, at most four, aircraft are airworthy at any given time.

 

Time to start working on C-130BZ replacement is now

The C-130BZs were scheduled to be replaced by Airbus’ new generation A400M airlifter, but this order was cancelled due to delays in production, and cost escalations. A deposit of R3.5 billion, paid to Airbus as a risk taking partner in the A400M programme, has been refunded to government but has not been allocated to aircraft acquisition. Indications are at least part of the refund went to the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Programme.

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2013 4 14 /03 /mars /2013 17:20

c130h

 

Mar. 14, 2013 - By BRIAN EVERSTINE – Defense News

 

The congressional mandate for the Air Force to keep 32 additional tactical airlifters will keep a Pennsylvania Reserve base alive and retain 24 more C-130s across all Air Force components.

 

The 911th Airlift Wing at Pittsburgh, Pa., will retain eight C-130s assigned to the base through 2014, Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., announced Wednesday. The C-130s were originally slated to be cut in fiscal 2013 budget plans. Murphy said in a statement that the decision will affect 1,400 active-duty airmen, reservists, technicians and civilians at the 911th.

 

The 2013 National Defense Authorization Act created an Intratheater Airlift Working Group to find 32 tactical airlifters to keep through the fiscal year that would be available to assist in the drawdown in Afghanistan. Lt. Gen. Michael Moeller, the deputy chief of staff for strategic plans and programs, briefed Congress Wednesday on the aircraft the Air Force will keep.

 

Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said although the NDAA directed the Air Force to keep the additional aircraft, it did not provide additional funding for their operation, meaning the service will need to find the funding by reducing other programs.

 

Air Force Secretary Michael Donley said recently that the directive to keep additional tactical airlifters would not reverse Air Force plans to cut all C-27J Spartans.

 

In addition to Pittsburgh, the Air Force will retain two C-130s at the 109th Airlift Wing in Schenectady, N.Y., and the 139th Airlift wing in St. Joseph, Mo. One C-130 will be kept at each of the following: 123rd Airlift Wing in Louisville, Ky.; 130th Airlift Wing in Charleston, W.Va.; 18th Airlift Wing at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark.; 440th Airlift Wing at Pope Field, N.C.; 910th Airlift Wing at Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio; and 914th Airlift Wing at Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station, N.Y.

 

The NDAA directed the Air Force to keep 358 total aircraft through fiscal 2013, but the service will keep that limit through 2014 to allow time for additional studies and to address sequestration before the fiscal 2015 budget cycle.

 

“Although we were required to retain aircraft only through the end of this fiscal year, we extended the aircraft through FY14 to allow time to complete additional analysis and to coordinate with our stakeholders,” Donley said in a release.

 

For fiscal 2014, the service also will keep eight aircraft that were to be decommissioned from the reserve 934th Airlift Wing at Minneapolis Air Reserve Station. Additionally, the service will retain one aircraft each at Louisville; Charleston; St. Joseph; Niagara Falls; the 136th Airlift Wing in Fort Worth, Texas; the 145th Airlift Wing in Charlotte, N.C.; and the 176th Wing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

 

The service said it also will keep additional aircraft to “enhance mission effectiveness.” Those five are at Little Rock, two for the 189th Airlift Wing, two at the 22nd Air Force Detachment 1 and one for the 19th Airlift Wing, along with one each at the 152nd Airlift Wing in Reno, Nev.; the 165th Airlift Wing in Savannah, Ga.; the 166th Airlift Wing in New Castle, Del.; the 182nd Airlift Wing in Peoria, Ill.; and the 302nd Airlift Wing in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Partager cet article
Repost0
11 mars 2013 1 11 /03 /mars /2013 17:20

CAE logo

 

11 March 2013 airforce-technology.com

 

CAE has been awarded a series of contracts for the delivery of support services and upgrade of the simulators of multiple armed forces.

 

Valued at a combined C$90m ($87.2m), the contracts cover provision of C-130 training support services to the US and Taiwan air forces, maintenance services for the German Armed Force's flight simulators and modernisation of the US Navy's MH-60S helicopter trainers.

 

CAE Military Products, Training and Services Group president Gene Colabatistto said the company's large installed base of simulators and training devices serves as a steady source of orders for ongoing sustainment, maintenance and support services worldwide.

 

"We are also seeing increased opportunities for simulator upgrades and updates as defence forces look for ways to increase the amount of training done in a synthetic environment," Colabatistto added.

 

As part of the first contract, the company will deliver maintenance, logistics and engineering support services in support of the USAF's C-130J Maintenance and Aircrew Training System and the C-130 Aircrew Training System.

 

The contract also requires the supply of maintenance and support services for the C-130H training devices that are currently used by the Taiwan Air Force.

 

An annual contract modification by the German Armed Forces includes provision of on-site maintenance for their flight simulators for fighter, transport aircraft and helicopters in the next year.

 

As part of the third contract, the company will overhaul the US Navy's MH-60S operational flight trainers and weapons tactics trainers to improve training system fidelity and also maintain concurrency with current aircraft upgrades.

 

Tasks include updating the aircraft operational programme and aerodynamics model, besides incorporation of updates related to weapons and airborne mine counter measures.

 

CAE is also set to deliver comprehensive in-service support services, including systems engineering and data management to an unidentified military customer.

Partager cet article
Repost0
11 mars 2013 1 11 /03 /mars /2013 13:40

Su-25 source Ria Novisti

 

8 mars Aerobuzz.fr

 

Le déploiement sur la frontière turco-syrienne de batteries de défense aérienne Patriot n’est pas du tout du gout de Moscou. Du coup, la Russie décide de se doter d’un appareil dédié à la destruction de ce genre de systèmes. Il s’agit d’une version améliorée de l’avion d’attaque SU-25 Frogfoot.

 

A la différence de la version de base, cet appareil qui entrera en service dès 2014 sera doté d’un cockpit « tout écrans » d’une visualisation tête haute et d’un nouvel ensemble de navigation. Son système de mission associera des capteurs ESM (Electronic support measures) dont les antennes assureront une couverture de 360 degrés autour de l’avion.

 

Il aura la possibilité d’emporter des pods de brouillage et des missiles anti radar. De quoi dissuader les systèmes de type « Patriot » et autres ensembles hybrides à l’instar du « BUK M2 » ukrainien bricolé avec des missiles israéliens responsables de la chute d’un bombardier russe TU-22 en Georgie.

 

Les ingénieurs russes expliquent que l’appareil sera en outre capable de détecter et de brouiller les menaces à guidage infrarouge et laser avec des leurres et un brouilleur actif. Il est cependant curieux de constater que cette mission devait être initialement confiée au SU-34 récemment entré en service et non au vétéran Su-25.

Partager cet article
Repost0
21 février 2013 4 21 /02 /février /2013 19:30
La saga du Rafale aux Emirats Arabes Unis (1/3) : le temps de la réconciliation

 

21/02/2013 Michel Cabirol – laTribune.fr

 

Alors que le salon de l'armement d'Abu Dhabi (IDEX) ferme ses portes ce jeudi, nous publions le premier volet d'une saga sur les négociations du Rafale aux Emirats Arabes Unis en trois chapitres : le temps de la réconciliation entre Paris et Abu Dhabi. François Hollande et son ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, ont réussi à rétablir une relation de confiance avec le prince héritier Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, l'homme fort des Emirats Arabes Unis, qui avait fortement agacé par Paris fin 2011..

 

Une fois encore la France n'aura pas ménagé ses efforts pour propulser le Rafale dans le ciel bleu des Emirats Arabes Unis. Quelques semaines après la reprise des négociations en janvier entre Abu Dhabi et Paris portant sur la vente de 60 Rafale dans la foulée de la visite de François Hollande aux Emirats, le salon de l'armement d'Abu Dhabi (IDEX), qui a été inauguré dimanche, a bel et bien confirmé un net réchauffement des relations franco-émiraties sur ce dossier, qui avait fait l'objet à la fin de 2011 d'une grosse fâcherie entre Dassault Aviation et les EAU très agacés. C'est aujourd'hui du passé. Sur le salon IDEX, le ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, et l'homme fort d'Abu Dhabi, le prince héritier, Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, qui faisaient chacun leur propre tournée des stands des industriels, se sont croisés dimanche à deux reprises. Et ont visité ensemble dans une ambiance chaleureuse d'abord le stand de Nexter, qui attendait en vain d'être sélectionné par Abu Dhabi pour entrer en négociations exclusives pour la vente de 700 engins blindés à roues (VBCI), puis une seconde fois chez Dassault Aviation.

Les deux hommes ont ensuite partagé un déjeuner simple en dehors d'un cadre protocolaire strict, qui leur a permis de discuter librement du Rafale... et d'autres dossiers de coopérations entre la France et les Emirats. Bien loin des déclarations très abruptes de Jean-Yves Le Drian de retour d'un premier voyage aux Emirats fin octobre où il expliquait dans « Le Parisien » à propos du Rafale que « le rôle d'un membre du gouvernement, c'est d'établir les conditions de la confiance. Les industriels, eux, doivent jouer leur rôle et proposer l'offre la plus performante. Mais il ne faut pas mélanger les genres ». Des propos qui ne sont, semble-t-il, plus d'actualité. En tout cas à des années-lumière de son action à IDEX. Car le ministre a très naturellement débriefé ensuite le nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation, Eric Trappier, qui avait lui-même discuté une bonne demi-heure avec le prince héritier sur le stand de l'avionneur.

 

Un "road map" pour Dassault Aviation

"Nous sommes ici aux Emirats parce qu'il y a ici un client majeur pour nous, explique Eric Trappier. Je devais rencontrer dans mes nouvelles fonctions Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, et nous avons échangé sur la base d'une transparence mutuelle". Le nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation dispose aujourd'hui d'une "road map claire pour travailler", précise-t-il, mais il ne souhaite pas en dévoiler le contenu. Secret des affaires... Toutefois, le président du Conseil des industries de défense françaises (CIDEF), Christian Mons, a pour sa part indiqué qu'étant donné qu'en 2015 les premiers Mirage livrés auront 30 ans de service, "il y a une grande chance que le client (émirati) souhaite acheter en 2015/2016 et que nous commencions les livraisons en 2017/2018".

En tout cas, la reprise des négociations, accompagnée d'un nouveau climat de confiance, est une très bonne nouvelle pour Dassault Aviation et, au-delà, pour toute la filière de l'aéronautique militaire française qui ont un gros besoin pressant de charges de travail pour passer sans trop de difficultés le cap des restrictions budgétaires françaises. Toutefois, les négociations entre Abu Dhabi et Paris sont passées par tellement de haut et de bas depuis 2008, l'année de l'expression d'un intérêt pour les Rafale par les Emirats - c'est aussi le début d'une saga -, qu'il s'agit de rester prudent sur leur issue et sur un calendrier. "Le changement de gouvernance chez Dassault Aviation a été probablement l'élément clé d'une reprise des discussions entre Abu Dhabi", explique un très bon connaisseur de la région et de la famille régnante. Tout comme le changement de président de la République. L'intense activisme de Nicolas Sarkozy pour vendre le Rafale avait lui aussi fini par agacer les Emiratis, qui ont 60 Mirage 2000-9 dont ils sont très satisfaits. Certains de ces avions ont même été utilisés lors de l'opération Harmattan aux côtés de l'armée de l'air française.

 

François Hollande, VRP du Rafale ?

Nouveau président français, nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation et... nouvelles relations de confiance entre Abu Dhabi et Paris. Les Emiratis semblent aujourd'hui convaincus que le Rafale est meilleur que le Mirage 2000-9. En outre, Eric Trappier, qui est apprécié à Abu Dhabi, a laissé de bons souvenirs. C'est lui qui a conclu la vente en 1998 de 30 Mirage 2000-9 et la modernisation de 33 autres Mirage 2000 au standard des 2000-9, alors qu'il était responsable des ventes avec les EAU au sein de la direction générale internationale de Dassault Aviation. Tout est pour le mieux donc... reste encore à trouver le bon prix pour vendre le Rafale, objet de la fâcherie entre Dassault Aviation et Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan fin 2011. Enfin, pour reprendre le fil là où il avait été interrompu, il fallait un déclic. C'est la visite aux Emirats de François Hollande en janvier, qui remet définitivement en selle le Rafale.

Le président français et son homologue émirati cheikh Khalifa ben Zayed Al-Nahyane, évoquent le Rafale lors de leurs discussions. "Nous pensons que c'est un très bon avion, je n'ose pas dire que l'expérience l'a démontré, mais c'est pourtant le cas, aussi bien en Libye que même sur le théâtre malien", explique-t-il lors d'une conférence de presse. Nous pensons que c'est une technologie exceptionnelle, nous l'avons dit à nos amis émiriens. Ils ne le contestent pas d'ailleurs. Après, c'est une question de prix. (...) Mais ce n'est pas le président de la République française qui fixe le prix des avions. Donc cela obéit à des logiques de discussions, de négociations". C'est le feu vert pour la reprise des négociations entre le Team Rafale (Dassault Aviation, l'électronicien Thales et le motoriste Safran) et Abu Dhabi. D'ailleurs, François Hollande demande à son ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, de revenir aux Emirats pour poursuivre les discussions. Ce qu'il fera pour le salon IDEX après quelques jours en Inde. C'est le temps de la réconciliation.

 

Des liens jamais coupés

Les liens entre Abu Dhabi et Paris n'ont jamais été coupés mais la campagne présidentielle française, puis l'arrivée au pouvoir d'une nouvelle équipe gouvernementale, le temps qu'elle prenne ses marques, a freiné la reprise des discussions. « Il a fallu six mois de rodage au nouveau pouvoir français pour définir une stratégie et un volet politique à l'export », explique un grand patron de l'armement. Surtout, Abu Dhabi, débarrassé de la pression intense de Nicolas Sarkozy déployée pour parvenir à une signature rapide de ce contrat, veut se donner du temps pour renouveler leur flotte de Mirage 2000-9. Les Emiratis n'ont jamais été pressés de s'offrir de nouveaux avions de combat. Non pas qu'ils n'étaient pas intéressés par le Rafale mais simplement le renouvellement de leur fotte de combat ne coïncidait pas avec le calendrier de l'ancien président. "C'était une campagne politique orchestrée par Nicolas Sarkozy et non pas à l'initiative des industriels", rappelle un observateur. D'où ce décalage entre le besoin du client et la proposition de Paris... qui a d'ailleurs raté le coche en ne liant pas l'installation de la base interarmée française à Al Dahfra (Abu Dhabi) forte de 700 hommes prépositionnés, à l'achat des avions de combat par les Emiratis. "Est-ce maintenant trop tard ?", s'interrogeait en début d'année un industriel. Possible. "Avec le temps, on oublie les cadeaux qui ont été faits", poursuivait-il.

Des liens qu'aurait bien voulu détricoter le Premier ministre britannique, David Cameron, qui a tout fait pour torpiller les discussions entre Dassault Aviation et Abu Dhabi. Totalement décomplexé avec les ventes d'armes, il a proposé aux Emirats lors d'une visite officielle en novembre l'Eurogighter Typhoon, fabriqué par BAE Systems, EADS et l'italien Finmeccanica pour remplacer leur flotte actuelle de Mirage 2000-9. David Cameron a fait le job. Il a même signé un partenariat dans la défense prévoyant en particulier une "étroite coopération" concernant les Typhoon. Londres voulait ainsi persuader les Emirats d'adopter le Typhoon, avec la volonté d'établir à plus long terme "une collaboration pour le développement de la prochaine génération d'équipement militaire aérospatial". En dépit de la pression de David Cameron, Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan n'a jamais voulu annoncer que les négociations avec Dassault Aviation étaient arrêtées.

Partager cet article
Repost0
21 février 2013 4 21 /02 /février /2013 17:35
Smaller Version of BrahMos Missile being Developed for IAF

A smaller variant of the 290-km range BrahMos

supersonic cruise missile is being developed for

arming IAF's fighter aircraft (photo : defence.pk)

 

20.02.2013 Defense Studies


NEW DELHI: A smaller variant of the 290-km range BrahMos supersonic cruise missile is being developed for arming IAF's fighter aircraft. 

A new version of the missile is to be fitted on the frontline aircraft of Air Force including Su-30MKI, Mirage 2000 and the future inductions such as the 126 multirole combat aircraft, BrahMos officials said today. 

For the first time, the Indo-Russian joint venture showcased the model of the new missile at the 15th anniversary celebrations of the tie-up between the two countries. 

"Dr A S Pillai (of the venture) has assured us that BrahMos will be developing a miniaturised version of the missile for our other aircraft and the future inductions," IAF chief Air Chief Marshal N A K Browne said. 

BrahMos officials said the range of the missile would be 290-kms and it would be smaller by around three metres as compared to the present missile. 

At the moment, IAF and BrahMos are working on a Rs 6,000 crore project for integrating an air-launched BrahMos on the SU-30 MKI aircraft to allow the warplane to carry one missile under its belly. 

After the new missile is developed, the SU-30MKI would be able to carry three missiles while other combat jets of the IAF would be able to carry one each, they said. 

BrahMos Aerospace is also planning to carry out the underwater testfiring of the missile in near future which is expected to pave way for its induction into the Indian submarine arm.

 
Partager cet article
Repost0
21 février 2013 4 21 /02 /février /2013 11:30
Rafale photo S. Fort - Dassault Aviation

Rafale photo S. Fort - Dassault Aviation

 

21/02/2013 Michel Cabirol – LaTribune.fr

 

Troisième et dernier volet de la saga du Rafale aux Emirats Arabes Unis, le temps des fâcheries. Si l'année 2010 a été compliquée, celle de 2011 le sera encore plus. Le Rafale ne sortira des turbulences qu'en 2012.

 

Après une année 2010 où les relations franco-émiraties se sont nettement rafraichies, 2011 commence bien pour les chances du  Rafale aux Emirats Arabes Unis. La France a lâché fin janvier en rase campagne Air France en augmentant les droits de trafic aux compagnies émiraties (Emirates et Etihad) vers Roissy notamment. Au grand dam de la compagnie tricolore qui voit ses rivales arrivées en force en France. Mais Paris a voulu à tout prix éviter une nouvelle crise avec les Emirats pour ne pas compromettre à nouveau les chances du Rafale. Les équipes du Team Rafale (Dassault Aviation, Thales, Safran) peuvent reprendre le chemin d'Abu Dhabi pour reprendre les négociations là où les Emiratis les avaient abandonnées. Moqué en France pour son incapacité à être vendu à l'export, cet avion de combat, un concentré de la haute technologie française, devrait forcément l'être un jour. En 2011 ? Pourquoi pas aux Emirats arabes unis, où l'équipe France y croit à nouveau au début de l'année 2011. "Nous espérons de bonnes nouvelles cette année. Les discussions continuent avec les Emirats Arabes Unis", estime le nouveau ministre de la Défense, Alain Juppé dans une interview accordé en janvier au "Monde".

 

D'autant que les industriels ont réussi à réduire les surcoûts de développement à 3 milliards d'euros environ (contre une estimation initiale de 4 à 5 milliards). "Avant la Libye, la feuille de route technologique incluait un moteur plus puissant. Aujourd'hui, la motorisation actuelle (la version de l'armée de l'air française, ndlr) a montré toute sa pertinence", confirmera en juillet, le successeur d'Alain Juppé, Gérard Longuet. En février, les négociations progressent et sont "un peu plus actives", estime pourtant prudemment le directeur général international de Dassault Aviation, Eric Trappier, le jour de l'ouverture à Abu Dhabi du Salon IDEX. Mais encore une fois les relations tumultueuses entre les deux pays vont reprendre le dessus. Lors de l'inauguration d'IDEX, le prince héritier Cheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan ignore ostensiblement le stand Thales, pourtant situé entre celui de Dassault Aviation et de Safran, deux stands sur lesquels le prince s'arrête. Le groupe d'électronique, l'un des très grand fournisseurs d'équipements civils et militaires des Emirats ,a pourtant toujours joui d'une très bonne image dans le pays.

 

Crise entre Thales et Abu Dhabi

 

Que se passe-t-il entre Thales et les Emirats ? Une crise majeure couve entre Abu Dhabi et le groupe d'électronique, l'un des principaux partenaires industriels du Rafale, une information révélée à l'époque par La Tribune, qui s'est procuré à l'époque un télex diplomatique explosif. Les diplomates sont très inquiets sur la relation entre les deux pays. "Les prises de position (de Thales, ndlr) - sur les offsets (les compensations pour obtenir un contrat à l'export, Ndlr) notamment - sont incompréhensibles pour les autorités émiriennes. Elles peuvent impacter négativement les intérêts du groupe aux EAU, et indirectement sur certains projets, nos intérêts globaux", dont la vente de Rafale , s'alarment les diplomates en poste à Abu Dhabi. Ce constat est confirmé par plusieurs sources contactées à l'époque par La Tribune. "Cette attitude paraît de plus en plus intenable sauf à accepter des dommages durables", explique l'ambassade d'Abu Dhabi. Dans la foulée de ces révélations, le PDG de Thales, Luc Vigneron, s'envolera très vite pour Abu Dhabi... pour éteindre l'incendie et finalement signer l'accord cadre sur les nouvelles règles d'offset mises en vigueur par les autorités émiriennes depuis septembre 2010. Un dossier personnellement suivi par Cheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, qui a fait plier Thales.

 

Quelques mois passent, les négociations tournent au ralenti. Mais au cours de l'été 2011, les négociations entre Paris et Abu Dhabi reprennent très activement. "C'est un classique des Émirats de négocier pendant le ramadan", sourit alors un bon connaisseur de ces dossiers. Cela avait été le cas pour les Mirage 2000-9 achetés en 1998 à Dassault Aviation. Ainsi, l'équipe de négociations de Team Rafale et du missilier MBDA ont été "convoqués" par les autorités émiraties, qui mènent depuis le début le tempo des discussions, pour reprendre les négociations passées par des hauts et des bas depuis trois ans. Avec cette nouvelle phase de négociations, les Émirats ont semble-t-il changé d'attitude avec Paris. "Ce qui est nouveau, c'est qu'Abu Dhabi veut maintenant le Rafale", explique-t-on alors à La Tribune. Qu'est-ce qui a fait changer les Emiratis ? La Libye, plus précisément les performances du Rafale lors de l'opération Harmattan. Les observateurs du Golfe, qui ont disséqué les performances opérationnelles du Rafale en Libye ont été favorablement impressionnés. Du coup, les Émiratis sont dans un état d'esprit complètement différents et les négociations sont beaucoup "plus raisonnables" qu'auparavant, explique-t-on à La Tribune. Et certains se risquent à nouveau sur un calendrier pour une signature d'ici à la fin de l'année. Notamment lors du salon aéronautique de Dubaï prévu en novembre. Gérard Longuet, qui va être binetôt mis sur la touche sur ce dossier, l'assure quant à lui en octobre sur la chaîne LCI : "il y aurait une très forte probabilité que le contrat soit conclu".

 

Le prix du Rafale énerve énormément Abu Dhabi

 

Sauf qu'à nouveau un galet se glisse dans les négociations, qui se sont nettement durcies au fil de l'été. La question du prix fâche déjà à Abu Dhabi. La visite expresse à Paris (moins de 12 heures), fin septembre, du prince héritier d'Abu Dabi, qui a rencontré Nicolas Sarkozy à l'Élysée, s'est plutôt mal passée. Mal préparée, cette rencontre, censée tout remettre en ordre, ne fait pas avancer d'un pouce le dossier du Rafale. Bien au contraire. Mal briefé, le chef de l'Etat, pensant que le dossier Rafale était enfin réglé, aborde cette rencontre avec un angle de politique régionale, évoquant entre autre la question de la Palestine. Cheikh Mohammed repart de Paris sans avoir les réponses qu'il attendait. D'autant qu'il se plaint d'un gros écart de prix entre ses estimations et celles de Dassault Aviation. C'était pourtant l'une de ses trois demandes personnelles à Nicolas Sarkozy : obtenir un prix raisonnable. Ses deux autres souhaits : disposer d'un avion plus performant que le Mirage 2000-9 et que la France finance une partie des coûts non récurrents du Rafale.

 

Le débriefing de la visite de Cheikh Mohammed à l'Elysée est violent , rapporte un observateur. Conséquence, quelques jours plus tard, Nicolas Sarkozy décide de confier le dossier au ministre des Affaires étrangères, Alain Juppé. "Il fallait une personne de poids pour remettre le dossier à l'endroit", explique-t-on à La Tribune. Mais c'est trop tard. Abu Dhabi boudeur, mettra quant à lui très longtemps pour désigner un nouveau patron des négociations. Et décide de mettre à l'épreuve les Français avec l'Eurofighter. La crise va éclater quelques mois plus tard sur la place publique en plein salon de Dubaï. En outre, ils sont furieux contre la façon dont la France mène les négociations : trop d'interlocuteurs étatiques après le départ du secrétaire général de l'Elysée, Claude Guéant, au ministère de l'Intérieur ainsi que l'attitude "arrogante" de Dassault Aviation, selon des sources concordantes. Des progrès ont pourtant été réalisés après la visite express fin septembre à Paris de Cheikh Mohammed. Mais pas suffisamment pour Abu Dhabi visiblement. "Depuis la reprise en main par Alain Juppé du dossier Rafale aux Emirats , tout le monde en France marche dans le même sens pour vendre le Rafale, sauf Dassault", murmurait-on au premier jour du salon de Dubaï dans les allées.

 

Entrée en piste de l'Eurofighter

 

C'est même une douche glacée pour le camp français le dimanche lors de l'inauguration du salon aéronautique, le Dubaï Airshow. Les Emirats arabes unis, jusqu'ici en négociations exclusives avec Dassault Aviation pour l'acquisition de 60 Rafale, révèlent avoir demandé au consortium Eurofighter (BAE Systems, EADS et l'italien Finmecannica) de lui faire une offre commerciale. Une annonce qui prend complètement au dépourvu tous les industriels et officiels français présents au salon. Interrogés au Dubaï Airshow par La Tribune, ils minimisent ce coup de théâtre. Ils assurent pour la plupart qu'il s'agit d'une tactique des EAU pour faire baisser le prix du Rafale, jugé trop cher. Le ministre de la Défense confirme officiellement que "cette demande de cotation apparaît plus comme une mesure d'animation de la procédure". Il veut encore croire que "la France est proche du point final d'une négociation très bien engagée. Selon la position que l'on occupe, chaque froncement de sourcils peut rapporter ou coûter quelques centaines de millions d'euros", précise-t-il.

 

Ce qui a le don d'énerver encore plus les Emiratis, qui à la fin du salon, publient de façon très inhabituelle un communiqué cinglant. "Grâce au président Sarkozy, la France n'aurait pas pu en faire plus sur le plan diplomatique ou politique pour faire aboutir un accord sur le Rafale", déclare dans un communiqué le prince héritier d'Abu Dhabi. "Malheureusement, Dassault semble ne pas avoir conscience que toutes les bonnes volontés politiques et diplomatiques du monde ne peuvent permettre de surmonter des termes commerciaux qui ne sont pas compétitifs et à partir desquels on ne peut travailler". Résultat, les négociations sont au mieux gelées pour une longue période, au pire Abu Dhabi n'achètera jamais le Rafale.

 

Le forcing de Nicolas Sarkozy avant l'élection présidentielle

 

Une situation irrattrapable. C'est sans compter sur l'énergie de Nicolas Sarkozy, qui tente de réanimer les négociations. Trois mois après la crise augüe entre les Emirats et Dassault Aviation, l'avionneur serait à nouveau proche d'un accord avec les Emirats en février 2012 pour la vente des 60 Rafale. Incroyable. Une visite de Nicolas Sarkozy est même prévue le 12 février à Abu Dhabi, puis reportée début mars même si certains observateurs estiment que ce serait encore un peu tôt. Plutôt fin mars, début avril. Tous attendent désormais le feu vert du cheikh Mohammed bin Zayed. Car lui et lui seul décidera quand il signera ce contrat. Peu importe la pression de Paris et du candidat Sarkozy. "Quand, c'est la question que tout le monde se pose", rappelle alors une source contactée par La Tribune. Une chose est sûre, les relations se sont complètement détendues entre Paris et Abu Dhabi depuis la crispation de novembre. Et les visites sont nombreuses et régulières, le PDG de Dassault Aviation, Charles Edelstenne, et son patron des affaires internationales, Eric Trappier, y étaient encore en février. Des gesticulations qui n'aboutiront pourtant à aucun contrat au final. Car il aurait été incroyable que les Emirats fassent un geste pour Nicolas Sarkozy donné perdant avant l'élection présidentielle. Ce dernier s'est pourtant battu jusqu'au dernier moment pour convaincre les EAU de signer un contrat dans le courant du premier trimestre 2012.

 

Pour Nicolas Sarkozy, c'est un échec. Le président voulait constituer une équipe de France unie, qui parle d'une seule voix à l'exportation pour gagner les grands appels d'offres internationaux civils et militaires, notamment ceux concernant le Rafale. Pour ce faire, il avait nommé un pilote, Claude Guéant, alors secrétaire général de l'Elysée, en qui il avait toute confiance, et créé un outil, la war room, censée impulser une stratégie et une cohérence à ce qu'il appelait l'équipe de France. Le bilan est plutôt mitigé au bout de cinq ans mais au moins, la France parlait d'une seule et même voix à ses interlocuteurs. Sauf qu'avec le départ de Claude Guéant au ministère de l'Intérieur, la cacophonie est revenue dans cette équipe de France privée de capitaine. Abu Dhabi, qui avait relancé les négociations en plein été sur un rythme intensif, y compris lors du ramadan en août, entendaient depuis quelques semaines plusieurs sons de cloche au gré des visiteurs venus vendre les qualités et les prouesses du Rafale. Les Emirats avaient trop d'interlocuteurs, l'industriel mais aussi beaucoup trop d'étatiques, confirme-t-on au ministère de la Défense, qui stigmatise plutôt l'Etat et ses chapelles trop nombreuses. Un pilote a fait défaut.

 

Calme plat en 2012

 

A partir du deuxième trimestre, il ne se passera plus rien... ou presque pendant six mois en raison de la fin de la campagne présidentielle et de la mise en place de la nouvelle équipe gouvernementale. Fin mai, c'est même la panne pour le Rafale aux Emirats. Plusieurs sources concordantes industrielles et étatiques confirment que les négociations sur la vente de 60 Rafale sont alors au point mort. "La France a redécouvert que le client n'avait pas forcément besoin de ces avions de combat tout de suite mais plutôt à un horizon un peu plus lointain", explique-t-on à La Tribune. Seul fait notable positif, l'avion de combat se dote du nouveau radar RBE2 à antenne active de Thales, ce qui se fait de mieux actuellement. Seuls les avions de combat américains sont équipés avec.

 

On reparle enfin du Rafale aux Emirats en octobre. Le message s'adresse clairement aux Emiratis. De retour d'une visite aux Emirats, le ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian indique le 24 octobre dans une interview à Aujourd'hui en France/Le Parisien que les négociations pour la vente de 60 Rafale n'avait pas été abordée en raison d'une dégradation des relations entre la France et les Emirats. Selon lui, "ce dossier empoisonnait nos rapports. Les Rafale attendront. Cette discussion viendra ultérieurement", explique Jean-Yves Le Drian. "Mon objectif était de rétablir la confiance" car il y a "un effilochage" des relations entre les deux pays "depuis dix-huit mois". Conséquence, selon lui, "les EAU, qui effectuaient 70 % de leurs dépenses militaires en France, ont fait passer ce pourcentage à 10 %", affirme-t-il. Mais la visite de François Hollande mi-janvier à Abu Dhabi relance enfin le Rafale. Inch allah.

Partager cet article
Repost0
21 février 2013 4 21 /02 /février /2013 08:14

Rafale point-de-situation-du-15-janvier-2012-1

 

21/02/2013, Michel Cabirol – LaTribune.fr

 

Alors que le salon de l'armement d'Abu Dhabi (IDEX) ferme ses portes ce jeudi, nous publions le premier volet d'une saga sur les négociations du Rafale aux Emirats Arabes Unis en trois chapitres : le temps de la réconciliation entre Paris et Abu Dhabi. François Hollande et son ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, ont réussi à rétablir une relation de confiance avec le prince héritier Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, l'homme fort des Emirats Arabes Unis, qui avait fortement agacé par Paris fin 2011..

 

Une fois encore la France n'aura pas ménagé ses efforts pour propulser le Rafale dans le ciel bleu des Emirats Arabes Unis. Quelques semaines après la reprise des négociations en janvier entre Abu Dhabi et Paris portant sur la vente de 60 Rafale dans la foulée de la visite de François Hollande aux Emirats, le salon de l'armement d'Abu Dhabi (IDEX), qui a été inauguré dimanche, a bel et bien confirmé un net réchauffement des relations franco-émiraties sur ce dossier, qui avait fait l'objet à la fin de 2011 d'une grosse fâcherie entre Dassault Aviation et les EAU très agacés. C'est aujourd'hui du passé. Sur le salon IDEX, le ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, et l'homme fort d'Abu Dhabi, le prince héritier, Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, qui faisaient chacun leur propre tournée des stands des industriels, se sont croisés dimanche à deux reprises. Et ont visité ensemble dans une ambiance chaleureuse d'abord le stand de Nexter, qui attendait en vain d'être sélectionné par Abu Dhabi pour entrer en négociations exclusives pour la vente de 700 engins blindés à roues (VBCI), puis une seconde fois chez Dassault Aviation.

 

Les deux hommes ont ensuite partagé un déjeuner simple en dehors d'un cadre protocolaire strict, qui leur a permis de discuter librement du Rafale... et d'autres dossiers de coopérations entre la France et les Emirats. Bien loin des déclarations très abruptes de Jean-Yves Le Drian de retour d'un premier voyage aux Emirats fin octobre où il expliquait dans « Le Parisien » à propos du Rafale que « le rôle d'un membre du gouvernement, c'est d'établir les conditions de la confiance. Les industriels, eux, doivent jouer leur rôle et proposer l'offre la plus performante. Mais il ne faut pas mélanger les genres ». Des propos qui ne sont, semble-t-il, plus d'actualité. En tout cas à des années-lumière de son action à IDEX. Car le ministre a très naturellement débriefé ensuite le nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation, Eric Trappier, qui avait lui-même discuté une bonne demi-heure avec le prince héritier sur le stand de l'avionneur.

 

Un "road map" pour Dassault Aviation

 

"Nous sommes ici aux Emirats parce qu'il y a ici un client majeur pour nous, explique Eric Trappier. Je devais rencontrer dans mes nouvelles fonctions Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, et nous avons échangé sur la base d'une transparence mutuelle". Le nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation dispose aujourd'hui d'une "road map claire pour travailler", précise-t-il, mais il ne souhaite pas en dévoiler le contenu. Secret des affaires... Toutefois, le président du Conseil des industries de défense françaises (CIDEF), Christian Mons, a pour sa part indiqué qu'étant donné qu'en 2015 les premiers Mirage livrés auront 30 ans de service, "il y a une grande chance que le client (émirati) souhaite acheter en 2015/2016 et que nous commencions les livraisons en 2017/2018".

 

En tout cas, la reprise des négociations, accompagnée d'un nouveau climat de confiance, est une très bonne nouvelle pour Dassault Aviation et, au-delà, pour toute la filière de l'aéronautique militaire française qui ont un gros besoin pressant de charges de travail pour passer sans trop de difficultés le cap des restrictions budgétaires françaises. Toutefois, les négociations entre Abu Dhabi et Paris sont passées par tellement de haut et de bas depuis 2008, l'année de l'expression d'un intérêt pour les Rafale par les Emirats - c'est aussi le début d'une saga -, qu'il s'agit de rester prudent sur leur issue et sur un calendrier. "Le retrait de Charles Edelstenne (l'ancien PDG de Dassault Aviation, ndlr) a été probablement l'élément clé d'une reprise des discussions entre Abu Dhabi", explique un très bon connaisseur de la région et de la famille régnante. Tout comme le changement de président de la République. L'intense activisme de Nicolas Sarkozy pour vendre le Rafale avait lui aussi fini par agacer les Emiratis, qui ont 60 Mirage 2000-9 dont ils sont très satisfaits. Certains de ces avions ont même été utilisés lors de l'opération Harmattan aux côtés de l'armée de l'air française.

 

François Hollande, VRP du Rafale ?

 

Nouveau président français, nouveau PDG de Dassault Aviation et... nouvelles relations de confiance entre Abu Dhabi et Paris. Les Emiratis semblent aujourd'hui convaincus que le Rafale est meilleur que le Mirage 2000-9. En outre, Eric Trappier, qui est apprécié à Abu Dhabi, a laissé de bons souvenirs. C'est lui qui a conclu la vente en 1998 de 30 Mirage 2000-9 et la modernisation de 33 autres Mirage 2000 au standard des 2000-9, alors qu'il était responsable des ventes avec les EAU au sein de la direction générale internationale de Dassault Aviation. Tout est pour le mieux donc... reste encore à trouver le bon prix pour vendre le Rafale, objet de la fâcherie entre Dassault Aviation et Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan fin 2011. Enfin, pour reprendre le fil là où il avait été interrompu, il fallait un déclic. C'est la visite aux Emirats de François Hollande en janvier, qui remet définitivement en selle le Rafale.

 

Le président français et son homologue émirati cheikh Khalifa ben Zayed Al-Nahyane, évoquent le Rafale lors de leurs discussions. "Nous pensons que c'est un très bon avion, je n'ose pas dire que l'expérience l'a démontré, mais c'est pourtant le cas, aussi bien en Libye que même sur le théâtre malien", explique-t-il lors d'une conférence de presse. Nous pensons que c'est une technologie exceptionnelle, nous l'avons dit à nos amis émiriens. Ils ne le contestent pas d'ailleurs. Après, c'est une question de prix. (...) Mais ce n'est pas le président de la République française qui fixe le prix des avions. Donc cela obéit à des logiques de discussions, de négociations". C'est le feu vert pour la reprise des négociations entre le Team Rafale (Dassault Aviation, l'électronicien Thales et le motoriste Safran) et Abu Dhabi. D'ailleurs, François Hollande demande à son ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, de revenir aux Emirats pour poursuivre les discussions. Ce qu'il fera pour le salon IDEX après quelques jours en Inde. C'est le temps de la réconciliation.

 

Des liens jamais coupés

 

Les liens entre Abu Dhabi et Paris n'ont jamais été coupés mais la campagne présidentielle française, puis l'arrivée au pouvoir d'une nouvelle équipe gouvernementale, le temps qu'elle prenne ses marques, a freiné la reprise des discussions. « Il a fallu six mois de rodage au nouveau pouvoir français pour définir une stratégie et un volet politique à l'export », explique un grand patron de l'armement. Surtout, Abu Dhabi, débarrassé de la pression intense de Nicolas Sarkozy déployée pour parvenir à une signature rapide de ce contrat, veut se donner du temps pour renouveler leur flotte de Mirage 2000-9. Les Emiratis n'ont jamais été pressés de s'offrir de nouveaux avions de combat. Non pas qu'ils n'étaient pas intéressés par le Rafale mais simplement le renouvellement de leur fotte de combat ne coïncidait pas avec le calendrier de l'ancien président. "C'était une campagne politique orchestrée par Nicolas Sarkozy et non pas à l'initiative des industriels", rappelle un observateur. D'où ce décalage entre le besoin du client et la proposition de Paris... qui a d'ailleurs raté le coche en ne liant pas l'installation de la base interarmée française à Al Dahfra (Abu Dhabi) forte de 700 hommes prépositionnés, à l'achat des avions de combat par les Emiratis. "Est-ce maintenant trop tard ?", s'interrogeait en début d'année un industriel. Possible. "Avec le temps, on oublie les cadeaux qui ont été faits", poursuivait-il.

 

Des liens qu'aurait bien voulu détricoter le Premier ministre britannique, David Cameron, qui a tout fait pour torpiller les discussions entre Dassault Aviation et Abu Dhabi. Totalement décomplexé avec les ventes d'armes, il a proposé aux Emirats lors d'une visite officielle en novembre l'Eurogighter Typhoon, fabriqué par BAE Systems, EADS et l'italien Finmeccanica pour remplacer leur flotte actuelle de Mirage 2000-9s. David Cameron a fait le job. Il a même signé un partenariat dans la défense prévoyant en particulier une "étroite coopération" concernant les Typhoon. Londres voulait ainsi persuader les Emirats d'adopter le Typhoon, avec la volonté d'établir à plus long terme "une collaboration pour le développement de la prochaine génération d'équipement militaire aérospatial". En dépit de la pression de David Cameron, Cheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan n'a jamais voulu annoncer que les négociations avec Dassault Aviation étaient arrêtées.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 février 2013 4 07 /02 /février /2013 17:20

Armed-MC-27J-Alenia-Aermacchi.jpg

Armed MC-27J Alenia Aermacchi

 

Feb. 7, 2013 by Luca Peruzzi – FG

 

Alenia Aermacchi and ATK will complete the first phase of testing for an armed, multi-mission version of the C-27J battlefield airlifter by the end of February.

 

"The MC-27J version is not just a gunship", according to an Alenia Aermacchi source, "but an adaptable, agile and affordable platform solution to be equipped with a sensor, communication and weapon suite able to execute a wide range of customer-driven missions."

 

Unveiled as a product at the Farnborough air show in July 2012, the MC-27J is being developed and marketed by an Alenia and ATK team, with the companies acting as platform system integrator and modular mission and weapon system supplier, respectively.

 

"We are introducing roll-on and secure pallets, quick connect interface with avionics and aircraft systems, and working on an external antenna and sensor configuration to reduce operational limitations for transport missions," Alenia Aermacchi says.

 

The companies are offering a mission suite based on a roll-on/roll-off module, with two mission control operator stations, a cockpit display and command units capable of accomplishing a wide range of missions. The aircraft also boasts two electro-optical/infrared sensor (EO/IR) turrets for surveillance and weapon targeting, a new synthetic aperture radar, fire control system, secure radios and a datalink.

 

The armed configuration is based on a pallet-mounted ATK GAU-23 Bushmaster 30mm automatic cannon, also selected for the US Air Force's Lockheed Martin MC-130W Combat Spear special mission/gunship.

 

Weighing less than 900kg (1,980lb), with 500 rounds of ammunition, the weapon is fitted at the rear left door with the gun barrel protruding.

 

Flight International understands the gun has a slant range of 2.2nm (4km) from a 5,000ft (1,520m) altitude, and will be fired in unpressured conditions to enhance accuracy. The MC-27J also can carry precision-guided munitions, including those released from launchers incorporated with the aircraft's rear ramp.

 

An Alenia Aermacchi source says the first firing test phase will be performed at a US range, using a company-owned C-27J with a fixed gun with manual adjustment and cameras installed. The process will include five or six flights involving single and multiple rounds being fired, and will be completed during February.

 

The companies have, meanwhile, already started a second phase of work with an ATK-provided GAU-23 gun trainable mount, fire control software, installed EO/IR turrets and a mission system. These activities are scheduled to be completed, with additional testing, before the end of 2013.

 

Alenia Aermacchi says the C-27J has so far been ordered by 10 customers, with the latest being Australia and an undisclosed nation from central Africa. The company has so far delivered 54 of the 91 aircraft ordered, with more than 60,000 flight hours amassed and the type delivering an average availability rate of over 70%.

Partager cet article
Repost0
6 février 2013 3 06 /02 /février /2013 18:40

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QlanAvTKJco/URC4sFg5H2I/AAAAAAAASpA/j067yUIsWXA/s1600/RKM_0118-751828.JPG

photo Livefist

 

06/02/2013 Michel Cabirol – LaTribune.fr

 

Alors que le salon aéronautique militaire de Bangalore ouvre ses portes ce mercredi et à quelques jours d'une visite de François Hollande, que peut espérer la France en Inde en 2013? Avec un bon karma, ce sera peut-être l'année de la France en lnde, qui avait été le premier pays client de l'industrie d'armement français en 2011. De nombreuses campagnes commerciales ou négociations pourraient être favorables cette année aux groupes tricolores.

 

Et si le karma était favorable en 2013 aux industriels de l'armement français en Inde. A commencer par Dassault Aviation, en pole position pour décrocher le contrat du siècle en Inde, MMRCA (Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft), baptisé par les Indiens "la mère de toutes les affaires" ("mother of all deals"). Un contrat évalué à 18 milliards d'euros. Depuis janvier 2012, l'avionneur tricolore est en négociations exclusives avec New Delhi pour la vente d'une première tranche de 126 Rafale, dont 108 seront assemblés localement par les industriels indiens.

 

New Delhi a un véritable besoin pressant pour renouveler sa flotte avec des avions modernes pour contrer la montée en puissance dans le domaine aérien de la Chine et du Pakistan. D'autant que l'armée de l'air indienne perd aussi beaucoup d'appareils, notamment des avions russes. L'Indian Air Force a perdu 50 appareils, dont 33 avions de combat entre 2008 et mars 2012. En outre, l'Inde doit faire face à de régulières violations de son espace aérien. Sans compter les infiltrations de Pakistanais par la vallée du Kashmir.  Le gouvernement indien se plaint régulièrement de ces provocations. Récemment encore, début janvier, le ministère de la Défense les dénonçait dans un communiqué : "Le gouvernement indien considère l'incident comme une provocation et nous le condamnons (...). Nous nous attendons à ce qu'Islamabad honore l'accord de cessez-le-feu strictement".

 

Rafale : tout se passe bien

 

"Tout se passe bien", explique une source proche du dossier même s'il y a peu de chance que ce contrat soit signé, en dépit de la volonté de l'armée de l'air et des autorités indiennes, avant la fin de l'année fiscale, qui se termine fin mars. La visite de François Hollande, dont les dates du voyage (14 et 15 février) ont été révélées par Challenges, ne sera pas non plus l'occasion de signer ce mégacontrat. Dassault Aviation attend plutôt un contrat cet été, voire en fin d'année, selon nos informations. Pas plus tard car les élections législatives en Inde sont prévues en mai 2014. Trois mois avant la date des élections, aucun contrat d'une telle envergure ne sera signé. En décembre dernier, le ministère de la Défense indien avait publiquement et sobrement indiqué que "le contrat MMRCA n'a pas été finalisé jusqu'ici parce que les négociations sont en cours".

 

Tout l'enjeu pour Dassault Aviation est d'organiser le vaste transfert de technologies exigé par New Delhi dans de bonnes conditions pour les Indiens et dans des conditions de sécurité raisonnable pour le Team Rafale (Dassault Aviation, Thales et Safran). Ce qui est loin d'être simple. Car trouver des fournisseurs indiens pour un tel contrat relève d'un sacré défi... et prend du temps. Du coup, Dassault Aviation discute pied à pied les garanties financières en cas de défaillance des fournisseurs locaux.

 

EADS vise deux contrats en 2013

 

En Inde, il n'y a pas que le Rafale. EADS compte sur la signature de deux contrats cette année : le missile Maitri et les avions ravitailleurs. Sa filiale MBDA (37,5%) attend depuis des années un très beau contrat de l'ordre de 1,8 milliard d'euros en vue de codévelopper un missile sol-air de nouvelle génération en partenariat avec l'Inde. "Les négociations sont terminées depuis décembre 2011 et le programme est passé devant le conseil de défense en décembre 2012, explique-t-on à La Tribune. Du coup, il n'y plus trop d'étapes à passer". Le programme Maitri s'appuie sur le travail effectué par le DRDO (Défense recherche et développement organisation) et sur un transfert de technologies de MBDA pour combler les lacunes de l'industrie indienne. A terme, il est prévu la production d'environ 2.000 missiles Maitri par Bharat Dynamics Limited. Ce système de défense anti-aérienne répondra aux besoins de l'armée de l'Air, de la Marine et de l'armée de Terre.

 

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_o_no4M2xEPY/SZbCZX902tI/AAAAAAAAF_I/GuUa3PQyz7Y/s1600/DSC01756-733663.JPG

photo Livefist

 

Le groupe européen attend également la signature du contrat des avions ravitailleurs, A330 MRTT. L'Inde a sélectionné en janvier Airbus Military pour la fourniture de six avions ravitailleurs A330 MRTT en vue d'équiper son armée de l'air. La filiale d'EADS est entrée en négociations exclusives avec New Delhi... deux ans après avoir vu un premier contrat similaire annulé par le gouvernement indien. Une vente qui pourrait dépasser le milliard de dollars si elle était conclue à l'issue de négociations exclusives.

 

Eurocopter en piste sur trois programmes

 

AS550C3 with armaments Copyright Eurocopter Antoine Pecchi

 

L'Inde est le paradis des hélicoptéristes. Actuellement, il existe plusieurs campagnes commerciales représentant environ 10 milliards d'euros, dont deux ont été gagnées en décembre par Boeing (15 Chinook Ch-47F et 22 AH-64D Block-III Apache) pour un montant de deux milliards d'euros environ. De son côté, Eurocopter vise trois programmes de renouvellement de la flotte indienne. La filiale d'EADS, qui a répondu en 2008 à un appel d'offre international, attend désespérement depuis 2010... l'ouverture des enveloppes commerciales par New Delhi pour savoir si elle est à nouveau sélectionnée par l'armée de l'air indienne afin de renouveler la flotte d'hélicoptères Cheetah et Chetak. En jeu, 197 Fennec, la version militaire de l'Écureuil. Un contrat de 400 millions d'euros pouvant monter jusqu'à 1,5 milliard avec l'achat au total de 600 appareils. Elle vise également le renouvellement des hélicoptères de la Marine et des Coast Guard. Eurocopter propose respectivement 16 NH-90 et 56 AS565 MB Panther, qui sera d'ailleurs en démonstration en Bangalore.

 

DCNS plonge pour un nouvel appel d'offres pour 6 sous-marins

 

Scorpene-class attack submarine. (Photo DCNS)

 

Enfin, DCNS va participer au nouveau appel d'offres de New Delhi, qui souhaite contruire six nouveaux sous-marins, dont quatre seront fabriqués sur place, dans le cadre du programme Project-75i. New Delhi a lancé un appel d'offres début décembre. Ces sous-marins, équipés d'un système AIP pour des plongées plus longues, seront équipés de missiles de croisière. Enfin, le contractant devra associer des groupes locaux pour la fabrication de ces sous-marins à l'image de ce qu'avait déjà fait DCNS, qui a déjà vendu six sous-marins Scorpène à New Delhi en 2005 en coopérant avec le chantier naval Mazagon Dock, situé dans le port de Bombay.

Partager cet article
Repost0
5 février 2013 2 05 /02 /février /2013 18:35

tejas source Livefist

 

February 05, 2013 business-standard.com (PTI)

 

The much-delayed indigenous Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas aircraft is expected to be ready for induction into operational service by 2015, IAF chief Air Chief Marshal N A K Browne said today.

 

Talking to reporters, the IAF chief said the indigenous aircraft will have to be modified further for operating in high-altitude areas as recently during trials in Leh, its engine "did not work".

 

"By my estimate it (the Initial Operational Clearance II) should be by the end of this year and the Final Operational Clearance (FOC) should take another year-and-half more," he said on the sidelines of a seminar.

 

The FOC is the final nod required before an aircraft is considered to be ready for operational deployment in an air force. While the IOC I of the LCA Tejas was completed two years ago, but the FOC date has been postponed due to certain issues.

 

Browne said delays do take place in a development project such as the LCA. "Recently we went for high-altitude trials. The engine (of LCA) did not work at that altitude because it is a different cup of tea. Even the Su-30, when it was taken to Leh, it had to be modified. So, the LCA will have to be modified. It has to do the retrials," he said.

 

The IAF chief said the aircraft will take part in the exercise 'Ironfist', which will be held at Pokharan in Rajasthan on February 22.

 

"There it will be firing the R-73 missile along with laser guided bombs etc. But a lot more work is still required," he said.

 

Earlier at an international seminar here, DRDO chief V K Saraswat said the LCA had completed 2,000 test flights.

 

At the same seminar, Browne said the IAF is planning to induct around 350-400 aircraft in the 12th Defence Plan period.

 

The air force is planning to procure more than 200 fighter aircraft including the 126 Rafale medium-multirole combat aircraft, over 40 Su-30MKIs, several types of transport aircraft and various choppers, he said.

 

Listing the major modernisation milestones achieved by the air force, he said the IAF signed 325 contract worth Rs 1.52 lakh crore for modernising the force.

 

"Of these, 217 contracts worth around Rs 84,000 crore have been signed with Indian companies," the IAF chief said.

 

In 2013-14, the IAF is planning to sign several deals including one for 126 Rafale aircraft, additional six C-130J Super Hercules and several chopper contracts for attack and heavy-lift category, he said.

 

On the future requirements of the force, he said advanced active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars, electronic warfare suites and unmanned combat aerial vehicles were the need of the force in the future.

 

The IAF chief said testing facilities of DRDO and defence PSUs should be opened up for private sector as they are national assets.

Partager cet article
Repost0
5 février 2013 2 05 /02 /février /2013 08:59

Hawk Mk-132 Advanced Jet Trainer (AJT)

 

05 February 2013 Pacific Sentinel

 

BAE are pleased to announce the extension of the Teaming Agreement with Elbit to develop next generation Indian Hawk airborne simulation capabilities.
 
BAE will jointly develop leading edge airborne simulation technologies as a response to the Indian Air Force (IAF) Virtual Training System (VTS) requirement. The requirement was first outlined in a Request For Information issued in 2009 and the companies have now extended the teaming agreement in readiness for a formal request from the IAF. This combined effort will build upon both companies extensive experience in the airborne simulation field and incorporate synthetic radar, electronic warfare, countermeasures and weapons into the Hawk Mark 132 mission system architecture. 
 
It will provide enhanced fast jet training on the Hawk Mark 132 allowing additional skills to be taught to pilots smoothing the transition to front line fast jet Squadrons. The Hawk Mark 132 VTS will revolutionise the IAF pilot training system and make India a world leader in fast jet training.
 
Michael Christie, BAE Systems Senior Vice President for India said “India is an incredibly important market to us and one we are committed to for the long term.  It’s an exciting time for Hawk in India with the aircraft continuing to be successfully built and delivered by HAL. Extending the agreement with Elbit paves the way for BAE Systems to introduce enhanced capabilities to the Hawk Mark 132 aircraft and make training for the Indian pilots even better.”
 
Partager cet article
Repost0
5 février 2013 2 05 /02 /février /2013 08:40

MiG-29-KUB-Indian-Navy-Fighter-Aircraft

 

MOSCOU, 5 février - RIA Novosti

 

La Russie livrera d'ici 2014 à la Marine indienne sept chasseurs embarqués Mig-29K/KUB, a annoncé mardi le directeur du Service fédéral russe pour la coopération militaire et technique (FSVTS) Alexandre Fomine.

 

"En application du contrat signé en 2010 sur la livraison de 29 MiG-29K/KUB, les quatre premiers chasseurs ont été fournis [à la Marine indienne en décembre 2012]. Sept autres appareils doivent être livrés avant la fin de l'année 2013", a indiqué M.Fomine qui conduit la délégation russe au salon international de l'aéronautique et de l'espace Aero India 2013.

 

Les MiG-29KUB sont des chasseurs multirôles embarqués destinés à assurer la suprématie aérienne, à remplir des missions de défense antiaérienne, à atteindre des cibles de surface avec des armes de précision, de jour comme de nuit, quelles que soient les conditions météo.

Partager cet article
Repost0
5 février 2013 2 05 /02 /février /2013 08:25

kc390

 

SAO JOSE DOS CAMPOS, Brazil, Feb. 4 (UPI)

 

Brazilian defense manufacturer Embraer has added more international partners to its program for marketing KC-390, said to be a cheaper alternative to Lockheed Martin's C-130J.

 

The C-130J updates the internationally renowned tactical transport workhorse C-130 Hercules, the four-engine turboprop military transport aircraft that was originally designed and built by Lockheed, precursor to Lockheed Martin.

 

The fast-aging C-130, modified in more than 40 versions since it first flew in the 1950s, is still used by more than 60 nations worldwide but the tactical air transport market has expanded with the entry of rivals. The Hercules family still claims the longest continuous production run of any military aircraft in history.

 

Embraer says it can compete against most rivals including Lockheed Martin's C-130J. The Brazilian planemaker has been recruiting international partners as part of a strategy to boost the competitive edge for its contender KC-390.

 

The old C-130 beat off competition from Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, Soviet/Russian Tupolev Tu-95 and Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker. Lockheed Martin's updated C-130J Super Hercules can perform in-flight refueling, air-to-refueling and tanking. Embraer says it hopes to give its KC-390 all those features plus more.

 

Embraer says its aircraft will command a lift of 23 tons against 20 tons for most competitors, which include the larger Airbus A400M, Russia's AN-12, Chinese prototype Yun-8/9 and smaller aircraft that represent indirect competition.

 

Embraer is extending its efforts and markets by crafting a jet-powered medium transport with a cargo capacity of around 23 tons, that can be refueled in the air, and can provide refueling services to other aircraft by adding dedicated pods, the Defense Industry Daily said on its website.

 

"The KC-390 has now become a multinational effort, and may be shaping up as the C-130′s most formidable future competitor," Defense Industry Daily said.

 

"A potential tie-up with Boeing just underscored the seriousness of Embraer's effort."

 

The Boeing Co. and Embraer announced in June last year an agreement to collaborate on the KC-390 aircraft program.

 

The two companies agreed to share specific technical knowledge and evaluate markets where they may join their sales efforts for medium-lift military transport opportunities.

 

Boeing says it can bring to Embraer its experience in military transport and air refueling aircraft, as well as knowledge of potential markets for the KC-390.

 

Luiz Carlos Aguiar, president and chief executive officer of Embraer Defesa e Seguranca, says the agreement will strengthen the "KC-390's prominent position in the global military transport market."

 

Embraer says global demand for tactical transport aircraft that can replace the C-130 and other transport planes exceeds 700 aircraft.

 

In 2011 Embraer signed a contract with DRS Defense Solutions for designing, developing, testing and producing the KC-390 cargo handling and aerial delivery system. The work will be performed by DRS Training and Control Systems in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

 

Some of the transport plane's structural parts will come from Portuguese companies after an agreement signed by Embraer and OGMA, or Industria Aeronautica de Portugal, and Empresa de Engenharia Aeronautica.

 

A declaration of intent between the Brazilian and Portuguese ministries of defense, signed in September 2010, preceded the contract, which emphasizes Portugal's commitment to purchasing KC-390 airplanes.

 

The Brazilian company AEL Sistemas, based in Porto Alegre, is another partner supplying components for the KC-390.

 

"The KC-390 is being designed to operate all over the world, in different scenarios, with the same outstanding performance," Embraer's Eduardo Bonini Santos Pinto said.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 janvier 2013 5 25 /01 /janvier /2013 08:45

denel_aviation_cheetah.jpg

 

24 January 2013 by Dean Wingrin - defenceweb

 

The South African Air Force (SAAF) has defended the cancellation of its contract with Aero Manpower Group (AMG), a Denel business unit, and has hinted that a new contract may be negotiated.

 

The long standing contract between the SAAF and AMG provides specialist technical and support personnel who are responsible for the maintenance of a variety of SAAF aircraft at bases across the country. However, the SAAF has given notice to Denel that they will not be renewing the current contract, which terminates at the end of March.

 

Last week, Denel Personnel Solutions said that as there was no contract or orders beyond March 31 this year, the only option was “retrenchment of the entire AMG workforce”. AMG has held talks with the affected employees at the various SAAF bases and have outlined the plan for their retrenchment.

 

In response to negative media publicity, the SAAF has reiterated that the termination of the contract was because the contract had been declared irregular by the Auditor General.

 

Lt Col Ronald Maseko, spokesperson for the SAAF, said that “the contract dates back to a period (1986) where the current governance regime did not exist. Consequent to the Auditor General’s findings in 2009, that the contract does not comply with the Public Finance Management Act and National Treasury Regulations, the SAAF has engaged its strategic partner Denel Aviation in pursuit of an acceptable solution.”

 

Since then, Maseko notes, the Auditor General has consistently referred to this irregularity and the SAAF’s notice of termination dates back to 2011.

 

“The termination of the contract, in accordance with a provision stipulated in the contract, places the SAAF in full compliance with the Auditor General’s recommendations and allows the SAAF to develop its strategic partnership with Denel Aviation unhindered by governance irregularities,” Maseko emphasised.

 

Despite the looming crises which will severely affect the airworthiness of a number of SAAF aircraft, including those in the VIP squadron, the SAAF has not revealed any contingency plans should the contract not be renewed.

 

Trade Union Solidarity has said that at least 75% of the 523 Denel employees are in the scarce and critical skills band, without which efficient functioning of the SAAF will not be possible.

 

The VIP transport aircraft operated by 21 Squadron are almost exclusively signed out by AMG personnel and the effects of the contract cancelation will be keenly felt by the President and Cabinet Ministers. Other AMG personnel perform critical roles in workshops and testing laboratories.

 

Despite the impending crisis, Maseko notes optimistically that the negotiation of a new contract with Denel “can only benefit the development of a vibrant South African aviation industry that is capable of continued support to the SAAF in executing its mandate.”

 

Even SAAF personnel who work side-by-side with the AMG employees or who fly the aircraft are uncertain of what will happen from 1 April. While it appears that Denel may be going through the legal motions of advising their employees of a possible retrenchment, just in case a new contract with the SAAF cannot be negotiated in time, the affected personnel are going through a trying time.

Partager cet article
Repost0
23 janvier 2013 3 23 /01 /janvier /2013 08:35

Kongyu 2000 early waring aircraft

 

22.01.2013 Pacific Sentinel

 

To counter the F-22 stealth fighter in a potential air war against the United States, China is developing third-generation early warning aircraft, according to our sister paper Want Daily.
 
Reports published by the Jamestown Foundation, a Washington-based thinktank, have noted that the phased array radar technology of the KJ-2000 and KJ-200 AWACS systems of the PLA Air Force is already one full generation ahead of the E-3C and E-2C early warning aircraft of the US. China is also currently one of the only four nations in the world to export its airborne early warning systems technology to foreign market after the United States, Sweden and Israel.
 
Read the full story at Want China Times
Partager cet article
Repost0
21 janvier 2013 1 21 /01 /janvier /2013 19:35

le-rafale photo source india-defence

 

January 21, 2013 Claude Arpi - rediff.com

 

The People's Daily, the Chinese Communist newspaper, says the sale of the Rafale fighter plane 'encourages, excites and spurs India's appetite and ambition to become a great military power while intensifying its aggressive and expansionist tendencies, which poses a serious threat to peace and stability in Asia.'

 

Does India have a choice, considering the People's Liberation Army's frantic speed of development, wonders Claude Arpi.

 

There were six in contention; four were dropped, and one became the Chosen One: The Rafale.

In French, 'Rafale' poetically means a 'sudden gust of wind.'

 

It was one of the six fighter aircraft in competition for the Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft, MMRCA, when the Indian Air Force wanted to acquire 126 polyvalent fighter planes.

 

In April 2011, the IAF shortlisted two birds -- the Rafale produced by Dassault Aviation and the Eurofighter (known in Europe as 'Typhoon') from EADS, the European consortium.

 

It was a big deal worth $12 billion. You can imagine the stakes, especially for Dassault which a few months earlier, was unsuccessful in exporting its flagship plane to Brazil and the Emirates.

 

Finally on January 31, 2012, the IAF announced that the Rafale was the chosen one.

 

The 'deal of the century' was that 18 Rafales would be supplied in fly-away condition by Dassault to the IAF by 2015 (or three years after the signature of the contract) and the remaining 108 pieces would be manufactured in India under a transfer of technology agreement.

 

The concurrent company did not let go easily and a lot of lobbying started. The British prime minister wanted Delhi to explain the reasons of favouring the French. 'The Typhoon is a superb aircraft, far better than the Rafale,' David Cameron said, adding: 'Of course, I will do everything I can --- as I have already -- to encourage the Indians to look at the Typhoon, because I think it is such a good aircraft.'

 

Interestingly, the Chinese were also unhappy with the selection of the Rafale by the IAF, but for other reasons.

An article published in The People's Daily (French edition only) argued that India and France were supposed to be non-violent countries, how could they ink such a deal?

 

The Chinese Communist Party newspaper affirmed: 'During the twentieth century in France there was a great writer called Romain Roland (1866-1944), the Nobel Laureate for Literature, who was strongly opposed to war. In India, there has been an illustrious politician named Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) who was a pacifist leader, known worldwide for his fights against violence.'

 

'At present, their homelands are engaged in a sinister and repulsive arms race, which shakes and profoundly changes the international scene. If by chance these two great and illustrious men were still alive, what would they feel about this selfish and pernicious transaction and what opinion would they give in this matter?'

Is it not amusing that the Chinese Communist Party's mouthpiece today quotes Gandhi in connection with the Rafale deal?

 

The People's Daily article also says the sale of the Rafale 'encourages, excites and spurs India's appetite and ambition to become a great military power while intensifying its aggressive and expansionist tendencies, which poses a serious threat to peace and stability in Asia.'

 

Well, does India have a choice, considering the frantic speed of development of the PLA (People's Liberation Army), PLAAF (Chinese Air Force) and PLAN (Navy)?

 

A few months later, an Indian MP alleged that there had been 'manipulation in the evaluation process'.

 

This eventually delayed the process as an independent investigation had to be conducted; it finally concluded that the evaluation was conducted according to the RFP (Request for Proposal) terms and defence procurement procedures. The intricate negotiations thus lost several months.

 

Once the hurdle created by the MP was removed, it was reported that in September, while in Bangalore, Air Chief Marshal N A K Browne stated that the process continued: 'The negotiations are absolutely on. We hope that at least this financial year, we should be able to finish the negotiations and finalise the deal... It is a very complex project, as we are discussing various areas like transfer of technology, the offset clause, what Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd will do and the cost as well.'

 

Dassault had some doubts about HAL's capacity to produce 108 aircraft; probably with reason, looking at the fate of the Tejas project which has taken more than 30 years to take off.

 

On November 6, Rakesh Sood, the Indian ambassador in France, told the Indian Journalists Association at India House in London that the contract would soon be concluded. 'The Rafale deal is in the final stages and hopefully, it should be concluded in the next 3 to 4 months.'

 

The negotiation, Sood added, was a hugely complex exercise. 'Along with that a pretty stringent clause has been put for transfer of technology, (there is an) offset clause, and Dassault Aviation has accepted them.'

 

At that time, it was probably thought that the signature of the deal could be synchronised with French President Francois Hollande's visit to India. Though Sood had certainly not read the French edition of The People's Daily, he spoke of France's 'long interest in Indian civilisation', adding 'recently a (French) lady had produced a nine volume Ramayana in French... Indian music, yoga and films are quite popular in France.'

 

Sood's conclusions about the civilisational closeness between India and France were not similar to Beijing's: India needed the Rafales. But it was not considering the cash crunch. The Indian economy was not doing as well as Montek Singh Ahluwalia, deputy chairman of India's Planning Commission, had announced, and the fiscal deficit had to be cut, Finance Minister P Chidambaram said.

 

Last May, Defence Minister A K Antony told Parliament that his ministry would seek a hike in the Rs 193,408 crore (Rs 193 trillion) defence outlay of the 2012-2013 budget as only a budget increase could take care of the threat of the China-Pakistan military nexus. Antony spoke of 'new ground realities' and the 'changing security scenario'.

 

But with the changing scenario, the Indian defence ministry announced it had to prioritise its expenditure for the remaining months of the financial year. The ministry decided to focus on purchases that would impact on the armed forces' operational preparedness.

 

For example, the ministry planned to speed up infrastructure development in Arunachal Pradesh, buy ammunition to end shortages and acquire high-value assets, from aircraft to warships.

 

In December, the finance ministry announced that the armed forces's modernisation budget would be slashed by around Rs 10,000 crore (Rs 100 billion) in the forthcoming Budget.

 

The Rafale deal would have to wait for the next financial year, along with the artillery guns modernisation programme (Rs 20,000 crore/Rs 200 billion), and the creation of a new mountain corps to counter China (Rs 65,000 crore/Rs 650 billion).

 

In the plan expenditure, the government has already allotted Rs 55,000 crore (Rs 550 billion) for the MMRCA deal. But this was five years ago and cost escalations are bound to have crept in, which might prove to be a serious problem.

 

The Times of India commented: 'The move will lead to a major slowdown in the ongoing acquisition projects. It also makes it clear that the already much delayed $20 billion MMRCA project to acquire 126 fighters will not be inked anytime before March 31.'

 

Though the IAF had been promised an additional Rs 10,000 crore to cater for the first installment of Rafales, defence expert, Major General Mrinal Suman (retd) told The New Indian Express that the budgetary cuts would impact 'all acquisitions in the pipeline, as they become easy targets.'

 

A gloomy scenario

 

It is in these circumstances that a new development occurred -- Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid visited Paris last week. While many had doubts about the deal, Agence France Press reported that India could buy up to 189 Rafales instead of the 126.

 

Apparently, Khurshid raised the possibility of an additional 63 jets being added to the shopping list. A source told AFP: 'There is an option for procurement of an additional 63 aircraft subsequently for which a separate contract would need to be signed.'

 

The deal would then mean a staggering $18 billion contract, which would be a great boon for the French defence industry, but costly for India though Indian suppliers could secure work equivalent to 50 per cent of the total value with the clause currently under negotiations.

 

Khurshid seemed confident during his visit to Paris. 'We know good French wine takes time to mature and so do good contracts. The contract details are being worked out. A decision has already been taken, just wait a little for the cork to pop and you'll have some good wine to taste.'

 

His counterpart Laurent Fabius said, 'The final decision belongs to the Indian government in its sovereignty. But from what I am told by my colleague minister of India things are progressing well, and I can confirm the full support of the French government.'

 

Another issue which might slightly delay the deal is that the IAF requires two-seater jets and not the one-seater model presently produced by Dassault, but this should be solved in due time.

 

The People's Daily had said, 'The delirious and bustling feeling of excitement from the French side resembles the behavior of Fanjin, which had a fit of madness upon learning that he was successful in the three-year provincial tests (under the Ming and Qing dynasties).' It is not exactly the attitude of the French (and the Indian) authorities who are progressing slowly, but surely towards an agreement, which is very important for both countries.

One can however understand that the Chinese are nervous.

 

Major General Luo Yuan, a well-known Chinese expert on military issues, recently quoted the ancient Art of War: 'The best policy in war is to thwart the enemy's strategy; the second best is to disrupt his alliances through diplomatic means; the third best is to attack his army in the field; the worst policy of all is to attack walled cities,' his conclusion was that to thwart the enemy's strategy, deterrence is the key.

 

 

It is valid for India too; too much delay in the 'deal' won't be good.

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories