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26 juin 2011 7 26 /06 /juin /2011 08:00

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=33750

 

21/06/11 By Craig Hoyle SOURCE:Flight Daily News

 

The British Army will be ready to start using its first Watchkeeper tactical unmanned air vehicles in Afghanistan this December, following the completion of operational field trials that will commence in October.

 

Maj Matt Moore, from the army's headquarters directorate, Royal Artillery, said one operational "task line" will be established in Afghanistan this year, with two more to follow by April next year and another three by October 2012.

 

Using WK450 air vehicles and related ground equipment, the Watchkeeper system will replace Elbit Systems Hermes 450s made available to the army since 2007 in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

Fielded under an urgent operational requirement deal with Thales UK, a current five task lines provide a combined 70h of full-motion video per day in support of ground operations. The interim service has so far logged more than 48,000h and provides "a battle-winning capability", said Moore.

 

The UK Ministry of Defence earlier this month expressed concern over the Watchkeeper programme, which is now due to deliver operational equipment around 10 months late. The delay has been attributed to earlier software issues and the need to meet some requirements that Moore said have evolved as a result of lessons learned in Afghanistan.

 

WK450 UAVs have now flown more than 230 flights totalling around 320h, said Nick Miller, Thales's business director for ISTAR and UAV systems. "Watchkeeper has broken some serious ground from a flight test and certification point of view," he said.

 

The first army personnel to use the Watchkeeper system began their training last month, and user acceptance work will be performed in October and November from the ParcAberporth UAV centre in west Wales.

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24 juin 2011 5 24 /06 /juin /2011 18:30

http://www.defenceweb.co.za/images/stories/MUGSHOTS/MUGSHOTS_NEW/Obama.jpg

 

24 June 2011 defenceWeb Reuters

 

US military commanders distanced themselves from President Barack Obama's timetable for withdrawing forces from Afghanistan, telling Congress they had sought a slower, less risky drawdown.

 

General David Petraeus, who is leading the US war effort in Afghanistan, and Admiral Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were clear in stating their public support for the decision Obama announced on Wednesday and said they would do their best to carry it out.

 

But at the same time they warned that the pace of the drawdown, which calls for a third of US forces in Afghanistan to leave by the end of next summer, would create additional risks to the unpopular, nearly decade-old campaign, Reuters reports.

 

"The president's decisions are more aggressive and incur more risk than I was originally prepared to accept," Mullen, the top US military officer, told a House of Representatives committee hearing.

 

Pressed by lawmakers, Mullen later added that he had concluded that the risks were manageable.

 

Petraeus scoffed at a suggestion he could have resigned over the president's plan. Obama, he said, ultimately had to factor in more than just battlefield conditions when making his decision -- an apparent reference to crumbling domestic support for the Afghan war.

 

"It is again a more aggressive approach than (top commanders) and I would have indeed certainly put forward, but this is not something I think where one hangs up the uniform in protest, or something like that," Petraeus said at his Senate nomination hearing to become the next CIA director.

 

Obama, speaking to about 200 soldiers at an Army base in upstate New York, defended his drawdown timetable and said the United States had turned a corner in the campaign that would allow for withdrawal.

 

"We're not doing it precipitously. We're going to do it in a steady way to make sure that the gains that all of you helped to bring about are going to be sustained," Obama told soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division, who listened mostly in silence.

 

But the military's comments, while carefully phrased, were an unusually blunt public admission of initial Pentagon resistance to the kind of speedy Afghan drawdown that Obama settled on. Military leaders had lobbied privately for more time, and outgoing Defence Secretary Robert Gates said publicly any troop withdrawal should be modest.

 

Gates, in an interview with PBS NewsHour, came out in support of Obama's decision, saying: "As I listened to the debate go forward, I became a strong advocate (for) the end of summer as one (option) that struck a balance between our military needs and sustainability here at home."

 

In Kabul, Afghan President Hamid Karzai, Washington's ally in a relationship made tense by allegations of incompetence and corruption, welcomed the plan for a gradual pullout and said Afghans increasingly trusted their security forces.

 

European nations that have contributed troops to the military effort against the Afghan Taliban insurgency said they would proceed with already planned phased reductions. They included France, Germany, Poland and Spain.

 

The Taliban, resurgent a decade after being toppled from power by U.S.-led forces following the September 11 attacks, dismissed Obama's announcement and said only a full, immediate withdrawal of foreign forces could stop "pointless bloodshed."

 

The group rejected any suggestion of U.S. military gains.

 

'RUSH TO THE EXITS?'

 

Obama's decision divided Congress, with some lawmakers demanding a more rapid pullout and others branding Obama's drawdown a dangerous political move to appease his Democratic base before the 2012 presidential election.

 

Calls to end the war have accelerated in the wake of the May 2 U.S. raid that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

 

"The bottom line is no number of troops will resolve the challenge of Afghanistan," Democratic Senator John Kerry said on Thursday.

 

Senator John McCain, a Republican who lost to Obama in the 2008 election, said, "I think we're taking a huge unnecessary risk."

 

Analysts said the risks of failure might be rising as the United States withdraws troops despite a stubborn Taliban enemy, rampant corruption and persistent militant safe havens in Pakistan.

 

Still, nearly 70,000 U.S. soldiers will remain in Afghanistan even after the cuts announced by Obama, about twice the number when he took office in January 2009.

 

Undersecretary of Defence Michele Flournoy, appearing at the committee hearing alongside Mullen, said, "Clearly, this is not a 'rush to the exits' that will jeopardize our security gains."

 

Mullen said bringing home troops offered some benefits, including reinforcing the goal of putting Afghans in control of their own security by the end of 2014.

 

"The truth is, we would have run other kinds of risks by keeping more forces in Afghanistan longer. We would have made it easier for the Karzai administration to increase their dependency on us," Mullen said.

 

The Taliban has been pushed out of some areas of its southern heartland, but the insurgency has intensified along Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, and U.S. commanders have wanted to shift their focus to that area.

 

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, appearing separately before a Senate committee, acknowledged there was no military solution to the conflict and said the United States had a broad range of contacts in search of a political resolution.

 

Asked if there were a possibility for a peace agreement with the Taliban, Clinton said, "I think there is, but I think that we're a long way from knowing what the realistic elements of such an agreement would be."

 

"I can only stress that we are committed to pursuing it, because it is the only path forward, there is no other path forward. Nobody is strong enough to really assert control," she said.

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24 juin 2011 5 24 /06 /juin /2011 17:55

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ScanEagle UAS (photo : Insitu)

24.06.2011 DEFENSE STUDIES

 

Insitu Pacific Reaches 25,000 Hours Supporting Australian Defence Force in Afghanistan

 

BINGEN, Wash., June 22, 2011- Insitu Pacific, the Australia-based subsidiary of Insitu Inc., today announced it has achieved 25,000 operational flight hours of ScanEagle Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) services with the Australian Army in Afghanistan.

 

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) has used ScanEagle heavily since June 2007. Completing up to 880 flight hours and 150 flights per month, Insitu Pacific personnel work alongside Australian Army personnel in theater to provide 24/7 specialist support with an industry-leading 99 percent mission-readiness rate.

 

“Insitu Pacific is committed to supporting ADF operations to the highest standard. The past four years and 25,000 flight hours in Afghanistan have clearly demonstrated that commitment,” said Insitu Pacific Managing Director Andrew Duggan.




This high standard was recognised at the Australian Defence Magazine (ADM) Congress earlier this year, when Insitu Pacific received the “Team of the Year Award” for ADM's 2010 best “Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) / Small to Medium Enterprise Team.” Insitu Pacific won the award in concert with the Army Aviation Systems Program Office Unmanned Air Vehicle Management Unit for their collaborative efforts delivering ScanEagle UAS services to the Australian Army in Australia and Afghanistan.

 

The ScanEagle UAS provides tactical aerial reconnaissance support to land forces in Afghanistan, protecting approximately 1,500 ADF personnel. Insitu Pacific's contribution in Afghanistan is part of ADF Operation Slipper, which is part of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) working under a United Nations Security Council (UNSC) mandate.

 

Insitu Pacific, located in Queensland, Australia, has provided UAS services to defence, civil and commercial interests in the Asia-Pacific region since June 2009. It is a subsidiary of U.S.-based Insitu Inc.

 

Insitu Inc., located in Bingen, Wash., is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Boeing Company. Insitu designs, develops and manufactures UAS and provides associated services for commercial and military applications. With a small footprint and expeditionary focus for both land and sea operations, the company's family of UAS solutions serves the needs of the global defense community. To date, these systems have accumulated 485,000 combat flight hours and 60,000 sorties.

 

(Insitu)
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24 juin 2011 5 24 /06 /juin /2011 17:40

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June 24, 2011 defpro.com

WASHINGTON | The United States is employing a three-part strategy to transition responsibility to Afghan authorities, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said here yesterday.

President Barack Obama announced his plan last night to withdraw 10,000 U.S. troops by the end of this year, and a total of 33,000 by September 2012. Clinton said she concurred with the president’s decision during her testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

“All three surges -- military, civilian and diplomatic -- are part of the vision for transition that NATO endorsed in Lisbon last December and that President Obama reaffirmed last night,” she said. “As he said, ‘Afghans must take responsibility for their own future.’”

Clinton discussed the progress occurring on the ground in Afghanistan, setting conditions for the transition of responsibility to the Afghan government.

“Since January 2009, we have tripled the number of diplomats, development experts and other civilian specialists on the ground in Afghanistan,” she said, “and we have expanded our presence out in the field nearly six-fold.

”These new civilians have changed the way we do business,” she added, “focusing on key ministries [and] sectors, and holding ourselves and our partners to higher standards.”

Clinton stressed the necessity of implementing all three surges together for the strategy to succeed.

“The three surges work hand in hand,” she said. “You cannot cut or limit one and expect the others to succeed. Ultimately, I believe we are saving money and more importantly, lives, by investing now.”

Stressing diplomacy as a key factor in building support for a political solution in Afghanistan, Clinton referenced a recent vote by the U.N. Security Council regarding sanctions against al-Qaida and the Taliban.

“Just this past Friday, the United Nations Security Council voted unanimously to support reconciliation by splitting its sanctions against al-Qaida and the Taliban into two separate lists, underscoring that the door is open for the insurgents to abandon the terrorists and choose a different path,” she said. “We welcome these steps.”

Shifting focus, Clinton discussed clear expectations for the United States’ relationship with Pakistan.

“As President Obama said last night, the United States will never tolerate a safe haven for those who kill Americans,” she said.

“We are looking at Pakistan to take concrete actions on the goals we share -- defeating violent extremism, which has also taken so many innocent Pakistani lives; ending the conflict in Afghanistan; and securing a stable, democratic, prosperous future,” Clinton said.

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24 juin 2011 5 24 /06 /juin /2011 06:40

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/79/Afghan_National_Army_emblem.svg/600px-Afghan_National_Army_emblem.svg.png

 

DULLES, Va. and PARIS, June 23, 2011 /PRNewswire

 

The first 16 Afghan Air Force (AAF) students recently completed English-immersion training on a contract led by Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) to provide fixed- and rotary-wing pilot training for up to 80 Afghan airmen.

 

The students are now attending aviation ground school, the second phase of the four-part pilot training program. The $42.8 million, three-year training contract supports NATO Air Training Command-Afghanistan under the U.S. Army's Warfighter Field Operations Customer Support (FOCUS) contract.

 

"We have the right people with the right skills and talents to ensure we train individuals who are capable of transitioning Afghan's newest military service into self-sufficiency," said program manager Rick Glynn, of Raytheon Technical Services Company LLC. He leads the Warrior Training Alliance consortium of about 120 subcontractors for Warfighter FOCUS. The AAF training is being conducted by one of Raytheon's teammates in a Middle East nation.

 

The Raytheon-led Warfighter FOCUS team is in its fourth year of delivering live, virtual and constructive training solutions that leverage proven technologies, integrated logistics support and expert engineering services for U.S. and coalition forces at more than 600 manned and unmanned locations worldwide.

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24 juin 2011 5 24 /06 /juin /2011 05:15

http://www.defensenews.com/pgf/stories24/062211afp_obama_315.JPG

 

22 Jun 2011 By STEPHEN COLLINSON, AFP DefenseNews

 

WASHINGTON - U.S. President Barack Obama on June 22 ordered all 33,000 U.S. so-called surge troops home from Afghanistan by next summer, declared the beginning of the end of the war and vowed to turn to "nation building" at home.

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks June 22 in the White House. (Pool photo via Agence France-Presse)

 

In a pivotal moment for U.S. national security strategy, Obama also signaled in a 13-minute primetime speech that the United States would no longer try to build a "perfect" Afghanistan from a nation ravaged by generations of violence.

 

"We take comfort in knowing that the tide of war is receding," Obama said in the East Room of the White House in an address blanketing U.S. television networks at a time of rising discontent on the war.

 

"Even as there will be dark days ahead in Afghanistan, the light of a secure peace can be seen in the distance. These long wars will come to a responsible end," Obama said.

 

The president's speech came as domestic political support fades for the war following the killing of al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden by Navy SEALs on May 2, and as Washington backs fragile Afghan reconciliation talks with the Taliban.

 

His decision on troop numbers amounted to a rejection of appeals from the Pentagon for a slower drawdown to safeguard gains against the Taliban and to allow a new counterinsurgency mission to unfold in eastern Afghanistan.

 

The president said that he would, as promised, begin the U.S. withdrawal next month and that 10,000 of the more than 30,000 troops he sent to war in an escalation of the conflict in 2009 would be home this year.

 

A further 23,000 surge troops will be withdrawn by next summer, and more yet-to-be announced drawdowns will continue, until Afghan forces assume security responsibility in 2014.

 

"This is the beginning - but not the end - of our effort to wind down this war," Obama said.

 

"We will have to do the hard work of keeping the gains that we have made, while we draw down our forces and transition responsibility for security to the Afghan government."

 

Although Obama said the tide of war was receding, there will still be more than 65,000 troops in Afghanistan when he asks Americans to give him a second term in November 2012.

 

Obama also argued that his policy of escalating the war against the Taliban and al-Qaida had forged substantial progress and had allowed him to commence troop withdrawals from a "position of strength."

 

He said that documents seized from bin Laden's compound in Pakistan showed that al-Qaida was under "enormous strain."

 

"Bin Laden expressed concern that has been unable to effectively replace senior terrorists that have been killed, and that al-Qaida has failed in its effort to portray America as a nation at war with Islam - thereby draining more widespread support," he said.

 

U.S. Army Gen. David Petraeus, the commander of NATO and U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and top Pentagon officials had asked for a slower drawdown through summer 2012 to allow them to solidify gains in southern Afghanistan and to mount counter-insurgency operations in eastern districts.

 

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Obama's decision, represented an "unnecessary risk" and noted Petraeus and Defense Secretary Robert Gates had recommended a "more modest withdrawal."

 

But Obama's timetable may be too slow for critics who want faster withdrawals from a war launched 10 years ago to oust the Taliban after it offered al-Qaida a haven before and after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

 

Some of Obama's fellow Democrats and some Republicans are demanding a faster U.S. exit from Afghanistan, and questioning the huge $10 billion-per-month cost of the conflict at a time of deep fiscal pain.

 

Obama argued the surge had made progress towards key objectives he laid down at the start of the escalation, namely: reversing Taliban momentum, disrupting and dismantling al-Qaida and building Afghan forces towards an eventual assumption of security duties.

 

One official said the U.S. operation against al-Qaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan tribal regions had "exceeded our expectations," saying 20 of the group's top 30 leaders, including bin Laden, had been killed in the last year.

 

Administration aides also rejected criticism that Obama's decision would put recent gains in danger and increase the chances that Afghanistan will slip back into an abyss of deep violence.

 

Obama also placed the Afghan mission in the context of his wider foreign policy and war strategy, arguing he has removed 100,000 troops from Iraq and will oversee the promised full withdrawal by the end of this year.

 

He announced that a NATO summit to review progress on Afghanistan will take place in his hometown of Chicago in May 2012, alongside the G8 summit of industrialized nations.

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23 juin 2011 4 23 /06 /juin /2011 20:30

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23/06/2011 LeFigaro.fr AFP

 

Le retrait partiel d'Afghanistan annoncé par le président Obama donne "assez de moyens, de temps" et de souplesse pour réussir et ne pas mettre en péril les progrès réalisés depuis un an et demi, s'est félicité hier le secrétaire à la Défense Robert Gates.

 

"Je soutiens la décision du président parce qu'elle donne aux chefs militaires suffisamment de moyens, de temps, et surtout, de souplesse" pour réussir, affirme le ministre dans un communiqué.

 

Barack Obama a annoncé mercredi soir le retrait d'ici à l'été 2012 des 33.000 soldats envoyés il y a 18 mois en Afghanistan en renforts, décision qu'il a justifiée, près de dix ans après le 11-Septembre, par les coups infligés à Al-Qaïda. Quelque 10.000 des 99.000 soldats américains actuellement déployés doivent être rapatriés d'ici à la fin de l'année.

 

Ces dernières semaines, de nombreux chefs militaires américains et M. Gates s'étaient dits en faveur d'un retrait "modeste" des troupes américaines afin de ne pas mettre en péril les gains réalisés face aux talibans depuis l'annonce de l'envoi des renforts en décembre 2009.

 

"Au cours des 18 derniers mois, nos troupes ont fait d'énormes progrès pour affaiblir les talibans, tout en développant les forces afghanes", note Robert Gates, qui quittera ses fonctions le 30 juin. "Il est essentiel que nous continuions à poursuivre cette stratégie de façon énergique", a-t-il cependant mis en garde.

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23 juin 2011 4 23 /06 /juin /2011 06:55

http://www.army.mod.uk/images/image-scroller/warrior-1.jpg

 

June 22, 2011 defpro.com

 

Telford, UK. | British Army Warrior vehicles in Afghanistan are now better protected and more mobile thanks to a fast-paced major package of upgrades developed and delivered by BAE Systems.

 

More than 70 of the infantry fighting vehicles have received a £30m upgrade following a series of orders placed with BAE Systems by the UK Ministry of Defence. Further upgrade kits have also been supplied.

 

BAE Systems has previously developed and produced over 70 UOR (Urgent Operational Requirement) modifications for Warrior to prepare them for operations in Kosovo, Iraq and now Afghanistan. These were designed mainly to enhance protection to the vehicle crews in the face of rapidly-changing threats and to better meet harsh local environmental conditions.

 

Approximately 30 new upgrades, known as TES(H) (Theatre Entry Standard - Herrick), have now been designed, developed, manufactured and fitted onto Warrior vehicles. Their primary aims were to further improve crew protection and restore vehicle mobility that had been reduced as a result of increases in vehicle weight from under 30 to around 40 tonnes.

 

TES(H) was developed, tested and managed by the Vehicles Readiness & Sustainment team at BAE Systems’ Telford site. BAE Systems co-ordinated fitting the new parts at the nearby DSG (Defence Support Group), Donnington facility. All vehicles have now been delivered for use in training and on operations.

 

The roll-call of British sub-contractors on the programme includes Allen Vanguard (Tewkesbury), Astrum, Remown (both Co Durham), Caterpillar Defence Products (Shrewsbury), Dana Spicer (Birmingham), GKN Driveline (Telford), Icon Plymer (Nottingham), MTL (Rotherham) Thales Optronics (Glasgow), Thyssen Krupp (Birmingham), Tinsley Bridge (Sheffield) and W A Lewis (Shrewsbury).

 

Lt Col Tony Marinos of Headquarters Infantry said: “With the dynamic nature of operations in Afghanistan, partnered, timely approaches such as this project, which quickly take on board lessons learned from the front line, can give our troops the fine-tuned equipment they need to do their jobs as safely and effectively as possible.”

 

BAE Systems’ business lead for Warrior David Jones commented: “The fast pace on TES(H) has been made possible by our knowledge of Warrior and painstaking planning between DE&S, DSG, ourselves and our supply network to ensure that these vehicles were ready for the front line as quickly as possible.”

 

TES(H) includes:

• A modular armour system to allow quick and easy fitment of “mix and match” armour packages to meet changing threats. Many of these packages have been developed under previous UORs

• Enhanced seating and armour to further improve mine protection.

• Uprated suspension and ride height to restore cross-country mobility.

• Lower lower-ratio final drive to increase low-speed mobility and climbing performance

• Motorsport derived carbon-fibre brakes, providing significantly reduced stopping distance.

• In addition, more than a dozen UORs developed specifically for Afghanistan have been fitted.

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22 juin 2011 3 22 /06 /juin /2011 12:45

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/International_MaxxPro.jpg

 

June 22, 2011: STRATEGY PAGE

 

The U.S. Department of Defense has ordered another 471 MaxxPro MRAP (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected) vehicles, at a cost of $758,000 each. These will be used in Afghanistan. The MaxxPro Dash was designed for use in Afghanistan, thus they are lighter (14 tons), shorter and have the engine and drive train tweaked to provide more power. Thousands of MaxxPro Dash models are headed for Afghanistan, or are already there. Like most MRAPs, MaxxPro Dash cost about a million dollars each, fully equipped and delivered to Afghanistan.

 

Meanwhile, the United States is putting more MRAP vehicles (per thousand soldiers) in Afghanistan, than it had in Iraq. Nearly all the combat forces in Iraq were American, so U.S. troops got most of the MRAPs. But in Afghanistan, a third of the 148,000 foreign troops are non-U.S. NATO. As the U.S. put more troops into Afghanistan, that went down to 30 or 25 percent for NATO, and there were a lot of allied troops lacking MRAPs (usually because they can't afford them). So the U.S.  stepped in to provide protection. Some Afghan Army units will also get American MRAPs, especially those Afghan troops operating with foreign troops (who are the primary target for the bombs and mines.) Ultimately, nearly as many MRAPs will be in Afghanistan as were in Iraq.

 

For two years now, the U.S. has been shifting its MRAP vehicle deliveries from Iraq (where nearly 10,000 were delivered) to Afghanistan (where over 5,000 have been flown in so far). In the face of increasing Taliban use of roadside bombs, MRAPs are seen as a way to keep U.S. and NATO casualties down. Some MRAPs originally headed for Iraq, are being diverted to Afghanistan. The main delivery limitation is the need to fly the MRAPs in, and that requires a large aircraft (C-17, C-5 or leased Russian equivalents.)

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22 juin 2011 3 22 /06 /juin /2011 06:45

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=33750

 

21/06/11 By Craig Hoyle SOURCE:Flight Daily News

 

The British Army will be ready to start using its first Watchkeeper tactical unmanned air vehicles in Afghanistan this December, following the completion of operational field trials that will commence in October.

 

Maj Matt Moore, from the army's headquarters directorate, Royal Artillery, said one operational "task line" will be established in Afghanistan this year, with two more to follow by April next year and another three by October 2012.

 

Using WK450 air vehicles and related ground equipment, the Watchkeeper system will replace Elbit Systems Hermes 450s made available to the army since 2007 in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

Fielded under an urgent operational requirement deal with Thales UK, a current five task lines provide a combined 70h of full-motion video per day in support of ground operations. The interim service has so far logged more than 48,000h and provides "a battle-winning capability", said Moore.

 

The UK Ministry of Defence earlier this month expressed concern over the Watchkeeper programme, which is now due to deliver operational equipment around 10 months late. The delay has been attributed to earlier software issues and the need to meet some requirements that Moore said have evolved as a result of lessons learned in Afghanistan.

 

WK450 UAVs have now flown more than 230 flights totalling around 320h, said Nick Miller, Thales's business director for ISTAR and UAV systems. "Watchkeeper has broken some serious ground from a flight test and certification point of view," he said.

 

The first army personnel to use the Watchkeeper system began their training last month, and user acceptance work will be performed in October and November from the ParcAberporth UAV centre in west Wales.

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22 juin 2011 3 22 /06 /juin /2011 06:15

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LADSON, S.C., June 21 (UPI)

 

U.S. vehicle manufacturer Force Protection Industries Inc. has received U.S. Marines contract modifications for field service representatives.

 

The representatives are in Afghanistan supporting operation of its mine-resistant vehicles.

 

Force Protection said the two firm, fixed-price modification awards are worth about $22.48 million.

 

The first, received June 14, was a six-month renewal for 87 field service representatives and their life support to install spall liner blanket kits, independent suspension kits, modernization safety kits and conduct general maintenance on the Cougar Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle fleet in Afghanistan.

 

The second, awarded June 15, was a six-month renewal of 43 field service representatives to support operations at Vehicle Support Facility-Afghanistan.

 

"The important sustainment, upgrade and modernization work continues for the Cougar vehicles in Afghanistan," Randy Hutcherson, chief operating officer of Force Protection said. "We are pleased to continue to provide this critical service to our Marine Corps customer to support the ongoing operations in Afghanistan."

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21 juin 2011 2 21 /06 /juin /2011 20:40
IAI Heron UAS Has Reached Full Operational Capability

 

Jun 21, 2011 ASDNews Source : Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd.

 

The German Air Force recently announced that the "Heron", Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)' advanced unmanned aerial system (UAS), has achieved full operational capability (FOC) under its activities in Afghanistan.

 

It's a significant milestone for the program, where IAI provided its Heron UAV system, together with its partner Rheinmetall Defence, to the Bundeswehr (German Armed Forces). The program included full in-theatre logistical and maintenance services performed by Rheinmetall.

 

The aerial platforms supplied, are equipped with IAI's stabilized day/night electro-optical, SAR payloads and Satellite Communications (SATCOM). Within five months of the signing of the contract, Heron was already deployed in the Afghan skies.

 

The Heron MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) UAS, is an interim solution, yet decisively enhances the Bundeswehr's important real- time intelligence, reconnaissance and surveillance (ISR) capabilities in their missions in Afghanistan. Heron is the first unmanned aerial system (UAS) ever to operate under the aegis of the GAF.

 

To date, the SAATEG interim solution has flown over 4,000 hours in Afghanistan, representing an average of twenty hours a day. At the end of May, the German Air Force declared the Heron squadron based in Mazar-e-Sharif to be fully operational.

 

Given its positive experience with the system, the Bundeswehr opted to extend the original one-year service contract for a further two years.

 

Furthermore, the German Air Force is reviewing ways of enhancing its performance.

 

In response to the Bundeswehr's requirement for a follow-on solution for SAATEG in the near term IAI and Rheinmetall plan to participate in the tender and offer IAI's Heron TP (turbo prop) strategic UAS. An advanced version of the Heron, the Heron TP is ready to go into operation right away. Heron TP was successfully inducted into the Israeli Air Force in February 2010.

 

To a large extent, the system will be modified and produced in Germany, meaning that it will make a major contribution to national know-how in this field.

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21 juin 2011 2 21 /06 /juin /2011 12:05

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Australia’s Counter-Rocket, Artillery and Mortar radar (photo : Australian DoD)

 

21.06.2011 DEFENSE STUDIES


 
Australia’s Counter-Rocket, Artillery and Mortar radar, known as C-RAM, been rolled out to a number of patrol bases and Forward Operating Bases across Uruzgan Province in Afghanistan. The C-RAM system provides vital warning of impending rocket attacks and mortar attacks against bases, providing precious seconds for our people to take cover, rather than being exposed in the open.

 

 
The system will roll-out to more forward operating bases over the remainder of this year. The provision of the C-RAM capability follows on from the Force Protection Review effected by former Minister for Defence Faulkner in 2009 and underlines the Government’s commitment to provide our troops with the best available equipment. Since it began operation in December last year the C-RAM system has provided ten warnings against rocket and mortar attacks resulting in no ADF casualties.

 

 
Most recently, the C-RAM system successfully detected and provided warning against indirect fire attacks on the Tarin Kot base early on 12 June and again on 14 June.


(Australian DoD)

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20 juin 2011 1 20 /06 /juin /2011 20:10

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Le bilan humain français n'a jamais été aussi lourd pour un 1er semestre. J. NICOLAS / ABACA

 

20/06/2011 Alexandre Sulzer

 

DEFENSE - Le dècès de Florian Morillon porte à dix le nombre de soldats tués au premier semestre dans le pays...

 

Après le décès d'un soldat samedi en Kapisa (lire l'encadré), le nombre de militaires français tués en Afghanistan en 2011 s'élève à dix. Un bilan qui n'a jamais été aussi lourd pour un premier semestre depuis le début de l'engagement hexagonal en 2001. Et le rythme semble s'accélérer puisque six de ces victimes ont trouvé la mort depuis le début du mois de mai.

 

«C'est naïf de penser qu'il puisse y avoir des guerres dans lesquelles les pertes ne seraient enregistrées que chez l'ennemi», analyse le géopoliticien Pascal Le Pautremat, collaborateur de la revue Défense. Pour lui et d'autres observateurs, l'équipement et l'entraînement des troupes ne sont pas en cause. «Depuis Uzbeen [col dans lequel 10 soldats français ont trouvé la mort en août 2008], l'armée a pris conscience de la nécessité de mieux équiper les hommes.» Véhicules blindés de combat d'infanterie en appui des fantassins, utilisation de mini-drones Drac lors des patrouilles, gilets pare-balles plus performants, hélicoptères d'attaque Tigre font désormais partie de la panoplie de l'armée française sur place.

 

Le harcèlement des talibans

 

Alors comment expliquer un bilan humain aussi sombre? «Comme les talibans ne sont plus en mesure de mener des opérations tactiques, notamment au sud de Tagab, ils se livrent davantage à du harcèlement via l'utilisation de bombes artisanales (IED) et des tirs ponctuels qui visent un fort impact médiatique», répond le colonel Thierry Burkhard, porte-parole de l'état-major des armées (EMA). «Nous intensifions notre présence, tenons nos positions et allons plus au contact. On ne peut pas se cacher tout le temps derrière un char», complète Laurent Attar-Bayrou, président de la Fédération nationale des anciens des missions extérieures. «Les raids contre l'insurrection sont plus offensifs, décrypte un haut gradé. Et pour cause: Nicolas Sarkozy veut négocier en position de force un retrait partiel des troupes à l'automne. Il lui faut donc gagner un peu de terrain.» Et prouver à l'opinion que le travail a été fait.

 

Le 62e soldat décédé depuis 2001

Florian Morillon, soldat de 1re classe du 1er régiment de chasseurs parachutistes de Pamiers (Ariège), a été tué samedi au cours d'un accrochage avec les insurgés lors d'une patrouille à pied dans la province de Kapisa. Il a été immédiatement évacué puis héliporté vers l'hôpital français de Kaboul où il a succombé à ses blessures. Il avait 21 ans. Il est le 62e soldat français tué en Afghanistan depuis 2001.

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20 juin 2011 1 20 /06 /juin /2011 19:00

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June 20, 2011 Andrew White SHEPARD GROUP

 

NATO forces have much work to do in order to fully exploit video imagery generated from ISR platforms, according to an industry specialist.

 

Speaking to Shephard, senior systems engineer at 2d3 Sensing, James Srinivasan, echoed comments from UK and US ISR officials by claiming that, as far as large volume streaming video was concerned, ‘we are behind in the exploitation of imagery’.

 

This, he stated, was of prime importance to ongoing ISAF operations in Afghanistan, especially where some 40 nations are looking to disseminate and share ISR information. ‘Interoperability is important and ISAF needs to work on this as well as non-government organisations and other government departments,’ Srinivasan continued. ‘Video is inherently different to still imagery and it is hard to shoe-horn into still imagery databases.’

 

According to Srinivasan, video imagery is increasing at a massive rate with 39 US Combat Air Patrols (CAP) alone (featuring US Air Force Predator UAVs) amassing a total of 350,000 hours of video imagery in 2010. This compares to projections for 2011 which forecast 48 CAPs producing approximately 420,000 hours which is set to rise further to 570,000 hours in 2013 with some 65 CAPs in operation.

 

‘Storing all of this full motion video is actually quite easy but once stored, how do we retrieve it?’ he asked.

 

Looking to the future, he described increased use of metadata and highlighted improvements in colour and contrast enhancement; stabilisation which would allow platforms to operate at greater ranges from targets; super-resolution; ‘mosaicing’ as a data reduction technique; and moving target indication.

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20 juin 2011 1 20 /06 /juin /2011 11:25

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source flightglobal.com

 

June 20, 2011 SHEPARD GROUP Source: IAI

 

The German Air Force recently announced that the "Heron", Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)' advanced unmanned aerial system (UAS), has achieved full operational capability (FOC) under its activities in Afghanistan.

 

It's a significant milestone for the program, where IAI provided its Heron UAV system, together with its partner Rheinmetall Defence, to the Bundeswehr (German Armed Forces). The program included full in-theatre logistical and maintenance services performed by Rheinmetall.

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16 juin 2011 4 16 /06 /juin /2011 22:12

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June 16th, 2011 By US Navy DEFENCE TALK

 

The Navy’s Fire Scout is proving its intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capability during its first land-based deployment in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.

 

The Fire Scout, managed by Navy and Marine Corps Multi-Mission Tactical Unmanned Air Systems program office (PMA-266), deployed in late April to CENTCOM in response to a DoD ISR Task Force request to provide ISR services in northern Afghanistan.

 

In nine months, PMA-266, in conjunction with ISR task force leadership and Northrop Grumman, conducted site surveys of various basing locations, interfaced with key leadership personnel in the CENTCOM chain of command, planned and executed deployment preparations and sustainment for joint and allied military operations in Regional Command North, Afghanistan.

 

“We are very pleased with Fire Scout’s performance during both its ship-based and CENTCOM deployments,” said Capt. Tim Dunigan, PMA-266 Program Manager. “The team has done an exceptional job testing and maintaining the system to ensure we could meet the warfighter’s demands.”

 

Fire Scout’s initial flight in theater took place May 2. Only 19 days later, PMA-266 Detachment Alpha established initial operational capability during its first tasked mission from the International Security Assistance Force’s Regional Command North area of responsibility.

 

The Fire Scout system provides full motion video and imagery from its electro-optical and infrared sensor payload along with laser designation of targets for troops in the field. With flight endurance of more than five hours, the system offers a long-dwell sensor with real-time dynamic re-tasking capability to respond to tactical forces. Additionally, a communication relay capability provides a beyond-line-of-sight capacity for troops and their commanders.

 

“Our team is very excited about the first expeditionary deployment of the Fire Scout system”, said Cmdr. Brian Stephens, Officer in Charge (OIC) for PMA-266 Detachment Alpha. “In less than one month, we have flown more than 200 flight hours and completed more than 80 sorties and we are on track to fly 300 hours per month.”

 

PMA-266 Detachment Alpha is a government owned/contractor operated deployment. The detachment includes a military OIC and assistant OIC, five Navy intelligence analysts, and 21 Northrop Grumman contractors to conduct missions in support of RC North tasking.

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16 juin 2011 4 16 /06 /juin /2011 21:39

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16 juin 2011 par Nicolas Gros-Verheyde(BRUXELLES2)

 

Les premiers militaires de la mission de formation de la police sont arrivés à Kunduz, annonce le ministère de la défense néerlandais. C’est un retour sur le terrain pour les militaires néerlandais, ou plutôt un nouveau développement de la présence des Pays-Bas en Afghanistan. Les parlementaires nationaux ayant voté, l’année dernière, pour la fin de la mission de force et sa transformation dans une mission plus discrète et moins exposée. Les Néerlandais ne sont plus dans les zones chaudes du sud mais au nord qui est une zone à risque moins intensif.

 

Le déploiement va durer plusieurs semaines. Les Néerlandais seront hébergés par la force allemande. La nouvelle mission comprend 545 personnes dont 225 policiers répartis essentiellement à Kaboul, Bamian et Kunduz.

 

Lire également : La nouvelle mission néerlandaise en Afghanistan : police, un peu ; militaire, beaucoup !

 

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16 juin 2011 4 16 /06 /juin /2011 07:15

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15 Jun 2011 By MICHAEL HOFFMAN DefenseNews

 

The U.S. will ship Afghanistan's army a fleet of 440 armored security vehicles in November, adding MRAP-level blast protection to a force that now travels mostly in lightly armored Humvees and pickup trucks.

 

The vehicles will be from the family of Medium Armored Security Vehicles (MASV), which includes nine variants and is similar to the M117 Armored Security Vehicles driven by U.S. forces. They are built by Textron Marine & Land Systems; the Afghanistan order is the first for the vehicles.

 

"The MASV platform is based on the U.S. Army ASV (M117) which has a proven track record in both Iraq and Afghanistan," wrote Col. David Bassett, the U.S. Army Tactical Vehicle project manager, in an email to Defense News.

 

Afghanistan National Army officials requested a multirole armored vehicle to transport eight soldiers that is easy to maintain as the young force is struggling to stand up its supply chain.

 

"Equipping the ANSF and building its facilities is only part of the solution. There is also an obligation to enable them to sustain and maintain this equipment and infrastructure so that the echoes of the past are not heard in the future," said Lt. Gen. William Caldwell, head of NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan, in a speech at the Brookings Institution.

 

The program will cost $543 million, and will be paid for by Afghan Security Forces funds. Textron officials said it will take 18 months to complete the order. The first 240 vehicles will arrive by June 2012.

 

Afghan and coalition forces chose not to give the Afghan forces Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected All-Terrain Vehicles because that family of vehicles lacked the required variants and cannot transport eight soldiers, as required by Afghan military leaders, Bassett said.

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16 juin 2011 4 16 /06 /juin /2011 06:55

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15 Jun 11 UK MoD - A Military Operations news article

 

Afghan helicopter pilots hone their skills in live-firing exercises on ranges near Kabul.

 

The Afghan National Security Forces continue to develop thanks to the support and partnership of British Armed Forces. Their airborne capability is also growing in the shape of the Air Interdiction Unit (AIU) who give valuable air support to the Afghan National Police on counter-narcotics operations.

 

The unit enables the counter-narcotics police to reach what would otherwise be completely inaccessible parts of Afghanistan.

 

A British advisor is working alongside the pilots during their training in Kabul, including practicing on live-firing ranges:

 

    "The pilots in the Air Interdiction Unit are amongst the most skilled in the Afghan National Security Forces," said Group Captain Adrian Hill, Deputy Commander of NATO Air Training Command in Afghanistan.

 

    "They continue to do some very specialist training - overseen by the coalition - in what are some very challenging and testing environmental conditions. The Afghan pilots are a real pleasure to work with," said Gp Capt Hill.

 

    "They're extremely keen to learn, and they take great pride in their training."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Ziarmal, Executive Officer of the Air Interdiction Unit, said:

 

    "We practise in different countries, like the US, UK, Ukraine and Afghanistan.

 

    "We recruit young men," he said. "They have their medical tests, then they stay here in Kabul for one year to learn the English language. After that we train them for two years. Then they come back and start work with us.

 

    "Morale is very important," said Lt Col Ziarmal. "So is health and education. We all work as a team."

 

Last year the British government issued the AIU with new equipment, vehicles, and uniforms. The AIU currently has twenty MI-17 helicopters and by the end of 2012 the unit is expected to number almost 100 pilots and air crew.

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16 juin 2011 4 16 /06 /juin /2011 05:35

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June 15, 2011 Andrew White, SHEPARD GROUP

 

Brussels - The Ministry of Defence will deploy its first Watchkeeper UAV systems to Afghanistan in April, over a year behind the original operational expectations of the British Army.

 

According to Maj Matt Moore, OC Watchkeeper Implementation Team and SO2 UAS HQ Director Royal Artillery, a total of three systems will be deployed in April to operate alongside Project Lydian Hermes 450s before the latter is eventually shipped out.

 

By October, the army then plans to deploy an additional six Watchkeeper systems which will signal the start of the drawdown of Project Lydian air vehicles. Thales is currently contracted to support Project Lydian until 2012.

 

However, British Army sources previously told Shephard that it had originally been hoped that Watchkeeper would deploy to Afghanistan by the end of 2010. The programme has suffered from flight trial delays although in 2009, officials had said this would not impact on the planned initial operational capability date of 2010.

 

According to Moore, the army started training on Watchkeeper on 16 May this year with operational field trials scheduled to take place from September to November at West Wales Airport. 'The equipment will be fielded and integrated into theatre during Q1 2012,' he continued.

 

Designed to provide 'timely' image intelligence (IMINT) to ground forces, Moore described the latest move to integrate the Thales I-Master GMTI/SAR radar onto the airframe, providing a range of up to 30km. Previously, Watchkeeper has flown with Elop's DcoMPASS 4 EO/IR payload.

 

Looking ahead to the proposed deployment, Moore urged: 'Watchkeeper has to have expeditionary and tactical mobility which is important for the fast-moving dynamic battlefield and giving a degree of organic capability for commander's requirements.'

 

The army is looking at deploying 'ISTAR tactical groups' on board Viking all-terrain vehicles in order to 'assist a battlegroup; assist in ISTAR and UAV planning', Moore continued. 'This provides an ability to dismount and remote equipment for use in headquarters and buildings.

 

However, Moore called for a common remote video terminal (RVT) on the modern day battlefield, allowing an operator to observe imagery from Watchkeeper and Predator UAVs as well as any other coalition platforms.

 

'Waveforms and encryption levels are different and we want one common RVT. This is still an issue and one that has not been solved by industry as yet,' he concluded. To date, the Watchkeeper programme has procured a total of five RVTs, designed to receive full-motion video feed from the air vehicle at ranges up to 10km.

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15 juin 2011 3 15 /06 /juin /2011 12:50

 

Jun 15, 2011 ASDNews Source : Naval Air Systems Command

 

Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md. - The Navy's Fire Scout is proving its intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capability during its first land-based deployment in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.

 

The Fire Scout, managed by Navy and Marine Corps Multi-Mission Tactical Unmanned Air Systems program office (PMA-266), deployed in late April to CENTCOM in response to a DoD ISR Task Force request to provide ISR services in northern Afghanistan.

 

In nine months, PMA-266, in conjunction with ISR task force leadership and Northrop Grumman, conducted site surveys of various basing locations, interfaced with key leadership personnel in the CENTCOM chain of command, planned and executed deployment preparations and sustainment for joint and allied military operations in Regional Command North, Afghanistan.

 

"We are very pleased with Fire Scout's performance during both its ship-based and CENTCOM deployments," said Capt. Tim Dunigan, PMA-266 Program Manager. "The team has done an exceptional job testing and maintaining the system to ensure we could meet the warfighter's demands."

 

Fire Scout's initial flight in theater took place May 2. Only 19 days later, PMA-266 Detachment Alpha established initial operational capability during its first tasked mission from the International Security Assistance Force's Regional Command North area of responsibility.

 

The Fire Scout system provides full motion video and imagery from its electro-optical and infrared sensor payload along with laser designation of targets for troops in the field. With flight endurance of more than five hours, the system offers a long-dwell sensor with real-time dynamic re-tasking capability to respond to tactical forces. Additionally, a communication relay capability provides a beyond-line-of-sight capacity for troops and their commanders.

 

"Our team is very excited about the first expeditionary deployment of the Fire Scout system", said Cmdr. Brian Stephens, Officer in Charge (OIC) for PMA-266 Detachment Alpha. "In less than one month, we have flown more than 200 flight hours and completed more than 80 sorties and we are on track to fly 300 hours per month."

 

PMA-266 Detachment Alpha is a government owned/contractor operated deployment. The detachment includes a military OIC and assistant OIC, five Navy intelligence analysts, and 21 Northrop Grumman contractors to conduct missions in support of RC North tasking.

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14 juin 2011 2 14 /06 /juin /2011 08:00

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June 13, 2011 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: US Air Force; issued June 10, 2011)

 

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan --- Fourteen mobility Airmen teamed together to fly a C-5M Super Galaxy on a direct, non-stop mission from Dover Air Force Base, Del., here June 5 and 6, 2011.

 

The flight was the first time a U.S. Air Force plane flew this northern route from the U.S., over Canada and into the Arctic Circle, then back down through Russian and Kazakhstan airspace to Afghanistan.

 

"Everyone involved with this mission worked very hard to make it happen," said Lt. Col. Thomas Loper, the pilot and aircraft commander for the mission. "We're also very proud to be a part of the historic mission."

 

U.S. Transportation Command and Air Mobility Command officials at Scott AFB, Ill., said the mission was a "proof-of-concept" flight that will help establish future sustainment operations in Afghanistan.

 

"Our mission is to provide the right effects, to the right place, at the right time through global reach, said Gen. Raymond E. Johns Jr., AMC commander. "This historic proof-of-concept flight is the embodiment of that mission. It provides a valuable new option that allows us to be effective to those we serve."

 

AMC's 618 Tanker Airlift Control Center planners at Scott AFB tasked and built the mission plans for the effort. It's part of TACC's continuing effort to support and control airlift and air refueling missions around the globe.

 

"This mission validates all the hard work TACC planners do every day," said Lt. Col. Matthew Ahern, a C-5 pilot with Dover AFB's 9th Airlift Squadron. Colonel Ahern was also a member of the aircrew for the mission.

 

AMC officials said the flight was a culmination of months of diplomatic efforts and operational planning, and further illustrates the military's commitment to finding innovative new ways to operate with increasingly constrained resources.

 

Maj. John Rozsnyai, a planner in USTRANSCOM operations at Scott AFB, said his command worked with the U.S. State Department, regional combatant commands, AMC, TACC and numerous other agencies to get this historic mission under way.

 

"This partnership was especially important in coordinating transit agreements with Russia and Kazakhstan," Major Rozsnyai said, "While civilian airlines have been using the airspace, this was the first time an AMC plane took this direct delivery route."

 

To make the entire 15-plus hour flight to Afghanistan, the C-5M was refueled by a KC-135R Stratotanker from the New Hampshire Air National Guard 157th Air Refueling Wing at Pease Air National Guard Base. The refueling took place over northern Canada.

 

"It's cool to be a part of a mission like this," said Master Sgt. Sam Blackwell, an in-flight refueling craftsman from the 157th ARW, who refueled the C-5M to full capacity.

 

USTRANSCOM planners said this flight is just the beginning of understanding new ways to strengthen the northern corridor.

 

"There will most likely be other flights that will originate from the western U.S. and won't require the use of tankers," Major Rozsnyai said.

 

"This route used by the C-5M may also be useful for swap-outs of deployed tankers and crews and for redeploying troops. The benefit might also allow for quicker trips saving days at home for deploying Airmen as well as requiring less stops for aircraft."

 

The aircrew for the mission combined active-duty and Reserve Airmen.

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14 juin 2011 2 14 /06 /juin /2011 07:00

http://fr.rian.ru/images/18841/72/188417245.jpg

 

KABOUL, 11 juin - RIA Novosti

 

Les Etats-Unis dépêchent en Afghanistan une équipe de contre-espionnage afin d'empêcher les talibans de s'infiltrer au sein de l'armée et de la police, a annoncé samedi la chaîne télévisée Tolo.

 

80 agents de contre-espionnage devraient très prochainement arriver en Afghanistan, a indiqué le porte-parole de la mission de l'Otan d'entraînement de l'armée et de la police afghanes (NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan, le colonel David Simons, cité par la chaîne.

 

Leur mission sera de vérifier minutieusement les dossiers des recrues de l'armée et de la police afghanes, ainsi que de débusquer des "taupes" du taliban, infiltrées au sein des forces de l'ordre de la république islamique.

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14 juin 2011 2 14 /06 /juin /2011 06:00

http://www.greenbang.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Carmanah-LED-Airfield-Lights.jpg

source greenbang.com

 

VICTORIA, British Columbia, June 13 (UPI)

 

U.S. Marines in Afghanistan are being supplied with solar hybrid airfield lighting systems from Canada's ADB Airfield Solutions and Carmanah Technologies.

 

The lighting systems, worth more than $1 million, will be installed by the Marine Wing Support Squadron in support of NATO's International Security Assistance Force.

 

"Our hybrid lighting system offers a unique portable lighting solution that will ensure safe, efficient and reliable aviation operations," said Carmanah Chief Executive Officer Ted Lattimore.

 

"This installation is an ideal project for the Carmanah/ADB partnership -- each company will contribute unique skill sets and experiences to provide Marine Corps Aviation with a practical, robust, energy-efficient solution."

 

The solar hybrid lighting system of Medium-Intensity Runway Lights have photometrics compliant to FAA AC 150/5345-46D and can be operated wirelessly using a hand-held controller or a ruggedized tablet personal computer.

 

Powered using either the light's integral photovoltaic panels or cables connected to an on-base power network, the solar airfield light-emitting diodes reduce or eliminate energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels and provide security in the event of grid failure.

 

ADB Airfield Solutions and Carmanah Technologies Corporation entered into a partnership in 2009 to combine expertise in solar power systems and aviation lighting and to develop energy-efficient visual navigation aid technologies.

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