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5 février 2011 6 05 /02 /février /2011 00:27
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4 février 2011 5 04 /02 /février /2011 00:35

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a6/M1A1.jpg

M1A1 conducts reconnaissance in Iraq in September 2004.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shane A. Cuomo


Feb 3, 2011 By Paul McLeary, Andy Nativi, David Eshel / AviationWeek.com


The decision late last year by the U.S. Marine Corps to send a tank platoon to Afghanistan was criticized by some analysts, who rejected the idea that M1A1 Abrams tanks could be useful in a counterinsurgency (COIN) environment. But for all the talk in recent years of the civilian population representing a center of gravity in COIN operations, and the corresponding need to cut back on air strikes, long-range artillery fires and other initiatives, one aspect of COIN has often been ignored—even with the outreach, local alliance-building and efforts to spare civilians from the ravages of war, the need remains to kill the enemy. As such, what the Marines are doing in southern Afghanistan with a platoon of tanks is hardly unusual. Main battle tanks (MBT) have been used successfully by the Canadians and the Dutch in southern Afghanistan, and by the Israelis, who learned hard lessons from bitter fighting in Lebanon in 2006, and went in heavy in Gaza in 2008-09. Rand Corp.’s David Johnson, a retired U.S. Army colonel who writes about heavy armor in conventional and irregular operations, and is finishing a book about Israel’s experience in Lebanon and Gaza, says Israeli officials tell him they’ve learned that if they don’t go into urban and asymmetric combat heavy, they won’t survive. “When they came out of Lebanon they restarted the Merkava Mk4 tank line to start building the Namer,” an armored personnel carrier based on a Merkava chassis, he says.

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3 février 2011 4 03 /02 /février /2011 23:47
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2 février 2011 3 02 /02 /février /2011 18:21

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4d/RAF_Tornado_GR4_ZA447_at_RIAT_2010_arp.jpg

RAF Tornado GR4 taxis to the runway at RIAT 2010

Photo by Adrian Pingstone


Feb 2, 2011 By Angus Batey / AviationWeek.com

RAF Marham and RAF Waddington

 

Changing combat conditions in Afghanistan and the advent of high-resolution pod-mounted sensors have seen a surge in fighter planes being used for a new type of recon activity known as non-traditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (NTISR).

 

Since deploying to Afghanistan in 2009, Royal Air Force Tornado GR4s have been used extensively in a counter-IED (improvised explosive device) role while still performing their established close air support mission. To enable the switch from one set of mission requirements to another while airborne, a two-aircraft patrol will carry a complementary suite of sensors and weapons. Alongside the onboard 27-mm. cannon, each aircraft is capable of carrying a mix of Paveway IV guided bombs and dual-mode-seeker Brimstone antiarmor missiles, the latter being the only weapon on any International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) aircraft capable of tracking and engaging a moving target. The GR4 also carries a Litening III targeting pod, which can be used to gather photographic imagery when not in targeting mode. During planned sorties, the Litening pod will gather photoreconnaissance information, often of pre-selected areas such as planned convoy routes, or locations where insurgent activity has been reported or suspected. The pod can also deliver full-motion video, which can be downlinked live to troops on the ground and/or studied afterwards. Some GR4 missions—typically 3-5 sorties per week—have one aircraft carrying the Goodrich-built Raptor (Reconnaissance Airborne Pod for Tornado) sensor. This produces high-quality photographic and infrared (IR) imagery covering a large area. While the precise limits of the capability are classified, the Tornado force team says it is able to bring back detailed photographs of an area such as an entire valley in a 4-hr. sortie.

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1 février 2011 2 01 /02 /février /2011 23:43

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/ISAF-Logo.svg/220px-ISAF-Logo.svg.png


February 1, 2011:by STRATEGY PAGE

 

In Afghanistan, Italian Tornado fighter-bombers can only use one weapon, their 27mm automatic cannon, and then only in emergencies and only with permission from higher commanders. No smart bombs or missiles can be used by these Italian fighter-bombers. The primary mission of the Italian Tornados in Afghanistan is reconnaissance and surveillance, but on rare occasions they go low to use their cannon (and expose themselves to enemy fire.) Italian helicopter gunships, however, may use both their 20mm automatic cannon and TOW missiles, but have to get permission from headquarters first.

 

This sort of thing can get worse. Some nations are not allowed to leave their bases, and other simply have lots of restrictions on how they can use their weapons. For nearly a decade, NATO commanders in Afghanistan have been frustrated by all the strings attached to their authority by politicians back home. The ROE (Rules of Engagement) for NATO troops contain dozens of restrictions on how the NATO commander may use troops assigned to him. Most of these have to do with where national contingents can be moved, and how much they can be exposed to danger, and even what weapons can be used. These restrictions render nearly half the NATO troops in Afghanistan useless for combat, but they are their because their governments promised to send troops to Afghanistan to fight Islamic terrorism.

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1 février 2011 2 01 /02 /février /2011 23:12
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1 février 2011 2 01 /02 /février /2011 22:09
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1 février 2011 2 01 /02 /février /2011 21:21
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31 janvier 2011 1 31 /01 /janvier /2011 22:51
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24 janvier 2011 1 24 /01 /janvier /2011 18:35
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