Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 13:00

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UYTZvrFYB70/Td9JBM1apTI/AAAAAAAAJZM/mVgNKjYYZWM/s400/Yakhont%2B4.jpg

 

Yakhont long range surface to surface cruise missile (all photos : VivaNews/TNI/Kompas)

 

May 27, 2011 DEFENSE STUDIES

 

Indonesia recently test-fired a Russian-made anti-ship missile, the Yakhont, in the Indian Ocean. There are fears that the modernising of armed forces across Southeast Asia may lead to an arms race.


There is no denying that a major upgrading of the defensive capabilities of Asean member countries is overdue, and that there is no reason to worry if and when any do so.

After all, we cannot expect Asean member countries to deal with present-day non-conventional security concerns, such as human trafficking, smuggling and piracy, while their armed forces are equipped with weapons so obsolete as to make pitchforks and parang a security threat.

There is, however, some cause for concern when the upgrading of the defensive capabilities of some countries lends the impression that the new weapons technologies that are being purchased may also be used for more belligerent intentions; and even more worrisome when there is the threat that such weapons technologies may fall into the wrong hands.


Furthermore, it has to be added that for most Asean member countries, the pressing needs of development have to come first: across both maritime and mainland Southeast Asia, there remains the dire need for better communication, transport infrastructure, schools and other educational facilities as well as the provision of healthcare -- all of which contribute to the sum total of a nation's social and material development. Nuclear weapons are not much use for countries where illiteracy remains a problem, it can be argued.

How then should the nations of Asean proceed in terms of the upgrading of their armed forces? Asean's formation in the 1960s was meant to serve as an instrument for the prevention of war: to prevent the Cold War from spilling into the region, and to prevent war from erupting between the member states. Thus far, Asean, along with the European Union, can claim some credit for being able to hold off the threat of both.

However, as the Asean member states continue to develop according to their own pace and trajectory, there is the need to ensure that communication between them remains at an optimum, real-time level. This has to be so in order to ward off any untoward incidents and concerns that might arise when one country suddenly ups the ante by acquiring a new weapon system that radically tips the balance of power in favour of it, at the expense of others.

It is in this light that we need to consider Indonesia's latest testing of its Yakhont anti-ship missile, which was launched in the Indian Ocean recently. The successful test-firing of the Russian-made missile marks a significant development in the military potential of Indonesia.


The anti-ship missile has a range of around 300km and flies at Mach 2.5, more than twice the speed of sound.

Vietnam, likewise, has the same missile capabilities, but its anti-ship missiles are based in land installations, rendering them useful for only defensive operations.

Over the past few years, other countries in Asean have beefed up their anti-ship missile capabilities: Malaysia has introduced underwater-launched anti-ship missiles in the Scorpene submarines.

The concern of some security analysts, however, is that these new arms purchases may inadvertently contribute to an arms race of sorts in Southeast Asia, and thereby decrease, rather than increase, Asean's role as a peacekeeping arrangement between its member states.

 

Furthermore, one has to wonder how anti-ship missiles contribute to the safety of our territorial waters where -- in some regions -- the threat of piracy, smuggling and human trafficking seem to be the real problems that need to be resolved. Are the naval forces of Asean going to stop the smuggling of pirated DVDs by launching million-dollar missiles in the future?

Countries like Indonesia do indeed need to upgrade and even expand their armed forces for reasons that ought to be clear to anyone with a grasp of arithmetic: it would be impossible for the armed forces of Indonesia to maintain security in an archipelago of 14,000 islands stretched across an area the size of Europe unless it has a bigger army that is professional and well-equipped.

But this also means purchasing less glamorous equipment like transport ships, coastal patrol boats, observation aircraft, and, of course, improving the salary, training and level of professionalism of the ordinary soldiers themselves.

Such stuff may not be to the liking of fans of Rambo and other gory war flicks, but the bottom line is that the running of a professional army is akin to the running of a well-organised company: the accounts have to be in order, logistics have to be accounted for, supplies have to be regular, and professionalism has to prevail always.

For the sake of the communities of Asean, whose combined population now stands on a par with Europe at well above 300 million, policymakers in the region need to remain lucid and cognisant of these simple economic facts.

Asean does need security and safety, but it does not need an arms race.

(New Straits Times)
Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/W-3_Sok%C3%B3%C5%82.jpg

 

27/05/11 By Greg Waldron Flight International

 

AgustaWestland subsidiary PZL Swidnik will deliver four W-3A Sokol transport helicopters to the Philippines by November this year, with another four in the second quarter of 2012.

 

The eight aircraft were purchased under a Ps2.8 billion ($64.4 million) deal. The Philippine air force says the Sokols will be used in the combat utility role, working closely with the nation's fleet of Bell UH-1 Hueys.

 

The Sokols will be tied in with the UH-1s and will "probably take over some of their roles", said the air force.

 

PZL Swidnik says the W-3A is a 6t twin-engined helicopter capable of carrying up to two pilots and 12 passengers.

 

The air force is also contemplating major avionics upgrades to its MD 520 light attack helicopters. It is particularly interested in configuring the MD 520s for night operations. It also plans to review a broad range of key systems including the helicopters' engines.

 

The Sokol purchase is significant as it represents the Philippines' first purchase of non-US helicopters. The Philippines has flown the Huey since the 1970s, and its air force has an active fleet of more than 80 UH-1H/Vs.

 

Earlier this year, the Philippine air force received five used UH-1s under a deal facilitated by the US Army Security Assistance Command.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=24126

 

27/05/11 By Greg Waldron Flight International

 

Indonesia has placed a $400 million order for 16 Korea Aerospace Industries T-50 Golden Eagle advanced jet trainers, the type's first export sale.

 

The Indonesian Defense Ministry signed the deal on Wednesday, said Enes Park, executive vice president of KAI. The contract stipulates that the aircraft must be delivered 18 months after the signing of a loan agreement between the South Korean and Indonesian governments.

 

The announcement follows a 12 April letter the Indonesian government sent to KAI designating the South Korean firm as the preferred bidder to replace Indonesia's BAE Systems Hawk 53s. The letter all but sealed the fate of the T-50's rivals in the competition, the Aero Vodochody L-159 and Yakovlev Yak-130.

 

The 16 General Electric F404-powered aircraft will be produced at the KAI facilities in Sacheon, South Korea. They will shipped to Indonesia partially disassembled, where Indonesia state aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia/Indonesian Aerospace (IAe) will reassemble them.

 

"The aircraft is certainly capable of being ferried, but transporting them meets Indonesian industrial regulations," says Park. "(Re-assembling) the aircraft will help them improve their capabilities."

 

Despite the best efforts of KAI and the South Korean government, theT-50 lost trainer competitions in both the United Arab Emirates and Singapore to the Alenia Aermacchi M-346.

 

The T-50 will again square off against its rival in Israel and the USA. In 2012, the Israeli Air Force will decide between the T-50 and M-346 to replaces its Douglas A-4 Skyhawk trainers. In early May, Alenia Aermacchi general manager Alessandra Franzoni said America's T-X competition to replace the 1960s era Northrop T-38C will be a two horse race between the T-50 and M-346.

 

Park adds that there could be a possibility of selling Indonesia the T-50's combat variant, the F/A-50. "While there have been no concrete discussions on this, there is a distinct possibility of this in the future."

 

Indonesia is also still involved in South Korea's proposed KF-X programme, says Park. At the Farnborough air show in 2010, South Korea signed a memorandum of understanding with Indonesia, with the latter to potentially contribute up to 20% of the KF-X development costs. Indonesia is currently looking at how it might participate in the project.

 

The T-50 buy is just the latest example of Jakarta's efforts to upgrade the nation's air force. In November 2010, it purchased eight Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano light attack aircraft to replace Vietnam War-era Rockwell OV-10 Broncos. In January 2011 it awarded Arinc Engineering Services a $66.7 million contract to modernise five Lockheed Martin C-130Bs.

 

Indonesia is also considering upgrading its 10 Lockheed Martin F-16A/B fighters. Media reports have said Jakarta will buy 24 ex-US Air Force F-16s, but this has not been officially announced by either Washington or Jakarta.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 12:00

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/--s3UCFce5TA/Td9En8vTU6I/AAAAAAAAJYs/vpz1mi3TrV0/s400/HMAS%2BManoora_DoD.jpg

 

HMAS Manoora (photo : Australian DoD)

 

May 27, 2011 DEFENSE STUDIES

 

After 17 years of dedicated service, the Royal Australian Navy’s amphibious transport ship, HMASManoora, was decommissioned at her homeport of Garden Island, in Sydney, today.

Following a time honoured tradition, the Australian White Ensign was lowered for the last time and handed to Commanding Officer, Commander Stephen Dryden, RAN.

Commander Dryden said Decommissioning the vessel was a bitter sweet moment.

“It is always sad to farewell a ship like Manoora, which has provided significant amphibious capability to the Australian Defence Force over her many years of service,” said Commander Dryden.

“Manoora has proven herself to be versatile and resilient, supporting humanitarian aid and disaster missions in the Solomon Islands and East Timor and undertaking active service in the Middle East as part of Operations Slipper and Falconer.”

“Her hard work has paved the way for the future of the Navy by providing an understanding of how to carry out amphibious and expeditionary warfare,” said Commander Dryden.

“Today it is also important to acknowledge the hard work of the current and former crews who have calledManoora home. Their dedication has enabled the platform to respond to situations in war and peace, whenever tasked by Government to do so.”

Manoora is a helicopter capable amphibious transport ship with a 40 bed hospital, which has seen an army contingent embedded as part of her crew.

 

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 11:35
L’irrésistible ascension de la marine de guerre chinoise

 

26 mai par Edouard Pflimlin, chercheur associé à l’IRIS - affaires-strategiques.info

 

Le 2 mai dernier, le quotidien chinois China Daily (1) rapportait une information largement passée inaperçue dans les médias occidentaux et pourtant très significative : l’agence de Surveillance maritime chinoise, l’équivalent des gardes-côtes, annonçait par la voix de son directeur Sun Shuxian le renforcement rapide de ses moyens, avec notamment l’acquisition de 36 bâtiments d’inspection supplémentaires au cours des cinq prochaines années, venant s’ajouter aux 300 déjà existants. Cette annonce est loin d’être neutre. En effet, cet organisme, créé le 19 octobre 1998, est une agence paramilitaire qui doit assurer l’application de la loi dans les eaux territoriales, les zones économiques exclusives et le littoral. Comme son alter ego japonais, certains navires sont importants, 30 ont plus de 1 000 tonnes de déplacement et le plus rapide a un rayon d’action de 5 000 milles nautiques. Ce renforcement traduit la volonté de « mener des patrouilles régulières plus fréquemment afin de renforcer l’application de la loi dans les eaux dépendant de la Chine pour sauvegarder les droits maritimes du pays en 2011  », indique Sun Shuxian. En clair, il s’agit de réaffirmer avec plus de moyens les droits mais aussi les ambitions de la République populaire en mer de Chine.

 

Cette annonce survient en effet 8 mois après un grave incident naval entre la Chine et le Japon autour des îles disputées de Diaoyu (en chinois) ou Senkaku (en japonais) en mer de Chine orientale. Elle est une nouvelle marque de l’expansion militaire navale chinoise.

Celle-ci n’est cependant pas récente même si elle s’est accélérée depuis quelques années.

 

Pendant longtemps, la marine de guerre (appelée marine de l’armée populaire de libération) a été reléguée au second plan. Certes, comme le rappelle Olivier Zajec (2), on « tend à oublier que la Chine a toujours été active dans la région. Dans les années 1950, la marine chinoise a repris la plupart des petites îles côtières contrôlées par les nationalistes de Tchang-Kai-Tchek. En 1974, elle a pris l’avantage à la faveur de la défaite du Sud-Vietnam pour occuper les îles Paracels, et en 1988 elle a pris le récif Fiery Cross près de l’Archipel des îles Spratly aux Vietnamiens…  ».

 

Cependant, de l’établissement de la République populaire de Chine en 1949 jusqu’aux années 1980, «  Pékin était surtout intéressé par la protection de ses côtes d’une invasion : sa stratégie navale durant ces quelque trente années était connue sous le nom appropriée de « défense près des côtes  »(3). La Chine ne possédait que des petits navires aux capacités limitées… Cette stratégie mettait l’accent sur la protection des eaux jusqu’à environ 12 milles de la côte de la Chine, en partie parce que durant les années 1950 il s’agissait de faire face aux forces du Kuomintang. Dans les années 1960 il s’agissait d’appuyer les opérations terrestres en cas de guerre entre la Chine et l’Union soviétique.

Après les réformes économiques et la politique d’ouverture du leader chinois Deng Xiaoping à partir de 1978, les régions côtières ont monté en importance ; ce qui signifiait que la marine chinoise devait orienter sa stratégie dans une nouvelle direction. L’amiral Liu Huaqing, qui est généralement crédité pour avoir conduit ou initié les efforts de modernisation de la marine, qu’il a commandée de 1982 à 1988, a permis la transition vers une doctrine de « défense active des mers proches ». Elle impliquait pour la marine de couvrir une aire beaucoup plus grande qu’auparavant, englobant les eaux à l’intérieur et autour de la « première chaîne d’îles », du Japon aux îles Ryukyu, de Taïwan aux Philippines jusqu’à Bornéo. La marine était donc en charge de la Mer jaune, la Mer de Chine orientale et la mer de Chine Méridionale notamment.

Cette nouvelle doctrine stratégique impliquait de nouvelles missions : au lieu de simplement soutenir les opérations de l’armée de terre, la marine devait se concentrer sur la réunification avec Taïwan, sur les différends maritimes territoriaux, sur la protection des lignes de communication maritimes et sur la dissuasion ou la défense contre une attaque ennemie par la mer. Après la crise du détroit de Taïwan en 1995-1996, la marine se concentra principalement sur les scénarios concernant l’île revendiquée par Pékin, comme un blocus, une invasion de l’île ou l’opposition à une intervention américaine.

Cependant la stratégie ne couvrait pas des opérations indépendantes dans des régions plus lointaines. Avec la montée en puissance de l’économie chinoise et le poids croissant de Pékin dans le monde, la marine évolue vers une stratégie nouvelle d’ « opérations dans les mers lointaines » avec des responsabilités qui s’étendent au-delà de la « seconde chaîne d’îles », partant du Nord du Japon jusqu’au Nord des îles Mariannes et Guam.

Ses nouvelles responsabilités font suite à l’énonciation par le président chinois Hu Jintao en 2004 des « Nouvelles missions historiques » de l’armée chinoise et du concept de « tâches militaires diversifiées ». La modernisation de la marine signifie que Pékin pourrait appeler celle-ci à défendre ses intérêts maritimes régionaux, protéger ses voies de communication, évacuer des ressortissants chinois en cas de crise à l’étranger, participer à des opérations d’aide humanitaire ou encore de lutte contre la piraterie. Mais la priorité reste encore maintenant aux opérations à l’intérieur des « premières et deuxièmes chaînes d’îles » et au conflit potentiel autour de Taïwan. Le Livre Blanc de 2006, le 5e du genre, a fourni ensuite un cadre pour le développement accéléré de la marine, en transférant aussi la priorité à l’armée de l’air, au « détriment » de l’armée de terre. Les 3 flottes (Celle la Mer de l’Est, dont le QG est à Shanghaï, la flotte du Sud basée à Zhanjiang et la flotte du Nord à Qingdao) ont été modernisées, chacune ayant par ailleurs leurs propres bases navales équipées de bombardiers et d’avions de chasse.

La modernisation des concepts stratégiques s’est accompagnée d’un développement impressionnant de la flotte de guerre. En 2010 (4), la marine comptait 225 000 hommes, dont 40 000 sont des conscrits. Au niveau de l’équipement, le nombre de sous-marins était estimé à au moins 58 dont six nucléaires, plus de 50 frégates et au moins 27 destroyers, plus de 180 navires amphibies ou encore 81 navires de guerre des mines. C’est devant le Japon la première force en Asie, si l’on exclut la marine américaine. Et en tonnage, elle était la troisième du monde.

Cette marine va aussi se doter prochainement de son propre porte-avions que la plupart des experts attendent pour 2015 ; elle a déjà acquis un ancien porte-avions ukrainien, le Varyag, en 1992.

 

Quelles sont les menaces que fait peser cette marine de guerre ?

 

Selon le dernier Livre Blanc sur la défense chinois (5), publié le 31 mars dernier, la marine chinoise a développé ses capacités de « conduire des opérations dans des mers lointaines » et a « amélioré ses capacités de dissuasion stratégique et de contre-attaque ». « De nouveaux types de sous-marins, de frégates, d’avions (de l’aéronavale) et de navires de soutien logistique ont été déployés comme prévu ». Les Etats-Unis, qui sont un acteur clef du Pacifique sur le plan militaire, avec notamment leur VIIe flotte et leurs bases militaires au Japon, s’inquiètent(6) de cette montée en puissance de la Chine populaire. La marine chinoise « développe les capacités pour attaquer les navires de surface ennemis jusqu’à 1 000 milles nautiques (1 853 kms) du continent grâce notamment à des missiles de croisière anti-navires à longue portée tirés à partir de sous-marins ou de destroyers lance-missiles. », sans compter les missiles qui peuvent être tirés de bombardiers stratégiques. « La plus grande menace pour la survie des porte-avions américains en mer est le nouveau missile balistique DF – 21 D antinavire qui a une portée supérieure à 930 milles. Il aurait atteint la capacité opérationnelle en 2010. » Les experts s’interrogent encore sur l’ampleur de la menace mais elle ne saurait être négligée.

Le déclin américain est toutefois relatif comme le rappelle la revue DSI (7). « Simplement, en nombre de navires de combat, la marine américaine a également le niveau de deux puissances vis-à-vis des flottes chinoise et russe, soit 203 bateaux par rapport à leurs 205 ». « Si l’on considère plutôt le tonnage cumulé, la marine américaine a le niveau de 13 puissances, avec un avantage de 2,63 contre 1 vis-à-vis des flottes russe et chinoise combinée… Ses 11 porte-avions et ses 10 porte-aéronefs représentent le niveau de neuf puissances et ils opèrent 980 avions, deux fois plus que ceux transportés sur les 16 porte-avions des neuf pays suivants… ». « Leur flotte de 56 sous-marins nucléaires peut paraître démesurée par rapport au reste de la flotte mondiale de 220 SSN et SSK d’autant plus que les avantages qualitatifs de la force des sous-marins américains sont énormes »…

Par ailleurs, les Etats-Unis redéploient une partie de leurs moyens militaires sur l’île de Guam(8), qui « devrait abriter des bombardiers à long rayon d’action et des sous-marins équipés de missiles de croisière ».

 

Alors pourquoi la marine chinoise fait-elle peur ?

 

C’est parce que la Chine a d’importants différends territoriaux maritimes avec ses voisins. Et aussi parce qu’elle est devenue le deuxième importateur mondial de pétrole derrière les Etats-Unis, qui provient essentiellement par voie marine, ce qui ne fait qu’accentuer les tensions.

L’épisode récent qui a mis aux prises des patrouilleurs japonais à un navire de pêche chinois datant de septembre 2010 autour des îles Senkaku, en mer de Chine orientale, a conduit à de vives tensions entre Pékin et Tokyo alors même que les pays sont devenus depuis peu les principaux partenaires commerciaux respectifs. Il faut dire que l’enjeu n’est pas que ces îlots inhabités, dont la plus grande fait 3,5 km2, bien loin de la capitale japonaise, mais revendiqués par les deux pays. Les eaux abriteraient d’importantes réserves d’hydrocarbures…

Mais Pékin entretient aussi un différend maritime avec Séoul en mer jaune. Et il faut aussi aller beaucoup plus au sud, en mer de Chine Méridionale, pour trouver un autre espace de confrontation. On l’a dit les îles Paracels ont été occupées en janvier 1974 par l’armée chinoise. Un conflit terrestre a eu lieu entre la Chine et le Vietnam en février 1979. En 1996, le Vietnam a réaffirmé ses prétentions sur cet archipel. L’archipel des Spratly (Nansha en chinois) est, lui, situé dans la partie sud de la mer de Chine Méridionale, «  il est constitué d’îlots, de récifs et de hauts-fonds découvrants… Six pays (le Vietnam, les Philippines, la Malaisie, Brunei, la Chine et Taïwan) se disputent la souveraineté de l’archipel(9) ». « La présence de la Chine qui revendique l’ensemble de l’archipel et occupe des îlots dispersés complique la situation ». Pékin a commencé à débarquer des troupes sur des îles et récifs à partir de 1988, «  ce qui avait donné lieu à des affrontements meurtriers entre les marines chinoise et vietnamienne à proximité du récif Johnson (78 soldats vietnamiens auraient péri)  ».

Là encore des ressources en hydrocarbures compliquent la donne. Par ailleurs, la zone a aussi un intérêt pour les forces nucléaires chinoises. De nombreux experts estiment que la «  Chine essaie d’établir un « bastion » ou un sanctuaire pour ses sous-marins nucléaires lance-missiles, qui pourraient déclencher une attaque balistique nucléaire contre les Etats-Unis. La Chine a récemment construit une base sous-marine souterraine sur l’île de Hainan, qui fait face à la mer de Chine Méridionale »(10).

 

Mais la marine chinoise va bien au-delà de la Mer de Chine Méridionale. En effet, pour assurer la sécurité des voies de communication par lesquelles passent les supertankers transportant le pétrole brut pour alimenter la consommation chinoise, « Pékin construit « un collier de perles » de bases chinoises permanentes le long des côtes de l’Océan Indien et des routes maritimes jusqu’au détroit de Malacca : Marao aux Maldives, Coco Island en Birmanie, Chittagong au Bangladesh et Gwadar au Pakistan…

 

Et elle intervient loin de ses bases pour participer à la lutte contre la piraterie au large de la Somalie. Récemment, elle a même déployé un navire en Méditerranée, une première, pour évacuer des ressortissants victimes de la crise libyenne.

 

Montée en puissance de la marine chinoise, revendications territoriales, réseau de bases ou de facilités navales, opérations loin des frontières… suscitent appréhension et réactions.

Le Japon a ainsi marqué ses craintes par rapport à la montée en puissance chinoise. Comme le souligne Céline Pajon(11) : « Les nouvelles orientations (de la politique de défense japonaise) de décembre 2010 notent ainsi que « le manque de transparence de la stratégie militaire chinoise constitue un objet d’inquiétude pour la communauté internationale et asiatique ». De fait, la réorganisation de la posture de défense japonaise semble d’abord répondre à la montée en puissance militaire chinoise. Elle rejoint la posture américaine qui, dans la Quadriennal defense review et un rapport du département de la Défense datant du mois d’août 2010, relève l’expansion de ma force navale chinoise et sa capacité de déni d’accès ». Les incursions répétées de sous-marins chinois dans ses eaux territoriales en novembre 2004 et septembre 2008, les exercices d’une ampleur sans précédent en mars et avril 2010 dans le détroit de Miyako, au sud de l’archipel d’Okinawa ont inquiété Tokyo avant même l’incident des Senkaku. Face à cette menace perçue, le Japon a décidé de restructurer ses forces : « L’accent est porté sur la protection des îles lointaines du Japon et la sécurité des routes maritimes. Afin de répondre au nouveau contexte sécuritaire, 2000 soldats japonais seront déployés sur les îles du Sud-Ouest (Nasei) face aux forces chinoises », souligne Céline Pajon. L’accent est aussi mis sur les sous-marins où le Japon excelle. Alors qu’en 1976 un plafond avait été fixé de 16 sous-marins opérationnels, les dernières National Defense Program Guidelines, rendues publiques le 17 décembre 2010, portent le plafond à 22 unités, face à la menace chinoise. L’expert Joseph Henrotin souligne (12) que « ces dernières années, il n’est plus tant question de prolifération sous-marine que d’une véritable course aux armements. Outre les développements observés en Chine, le Vietnam a commandé six unités, et l’Australie a affiché ses ambitions (six unités de plus, soit un total de douze) comme la Thaïlande (deux unités) et le Bangladesh (une unité). Singapour restera à quatre unités, la Malaisie à deux et les prévisions sont de dix-huit unités pour la Corée du Sud. En fait, seuls les Etats-Unis et la Russie – en raison de leurs positionnements – sont les seuls Etats « asiatiques » à voir une diminution de leurs flottes, et encore reste-t-elle à relativiser ».

 

Cette course aux armements qui ne concerne pas que les sous-marins illustre bien les inquiétudes des voisins de la Chine.

Signe que les temps changent, en août 2010, le porte-avions américain USS George Washington a visité la cité de Da Nang au Vietnam (qui fut notamment une importante base navale américaine). Or Da Nang n’est qu’à 300 kilomètres de l’île chinoise d’Hainan !

En réalité, un réseau de nations émerge dans la région qui essaie de contrebalancer la puissance chinoise avec pour pivot les Etats-Unis. Ceux-ci ont réaffirmé leur soutien à leur principal allié dans la région, le Japon. La secrétaire d’Etat Hillary Clinton a fait une déclaration importante en octobre 2010, concernant les Senkaku indiquant que ces îles entraient dans le champ de l’article 5 du traité de sécurité américano-japonais. Ce qui voulait dire que les Etats-Unis estiment qu’ils ont l’obligation d’aider le Japon à défendre ces îles, si elles étaient attaquées. En juillet 2010, la même Hillary Clinton soulignait au Forum régional de l’Asean (Association des nations du Sud Est Asiatique) que les «  Etats-Unis soutiennent un processus diplomatique collaboratif pour résoudre les différends territoriaux et s’opposent à l’utilisation ou la menace de la force  ». Or les différends en Mer de Chine Méridionale mettent en jeu des membres de l’Asean et la Chine. Là encore, les Etats-Unis signifient qu’ils ne resteront pas les bras croisés en cas de crise.

 

En conclusion, « la simple observation des croissances économiques et des parts du PIB affectées à la défense montrent que des pays comme le Japon, la Corée du Sud, l’Inde et surtout la Chine, sont encore loin d’atteindre leur plafond de développement naval  », indique l’expert Philippe Langloit (13). La Chine est loin d’affecter au naval ce que, comparativement, les Etats-Unis lui adressent. La marine chinoise pourrait donc connaître encore un développement massif et plus rapide. Deuxième constat de l’expert, « les marines sont toujours d’un point de vue historique, les instruments de l’expansion coloniale  ». La question est donc de savoir ce que la Chine fera de sa puissance navale.

Enfin, «  le développement des marines de guerre est historiquement associé à l’émergence les logiques de flux économiques, culturels, de savoir et autre, qui ont constitué les premières « briques » du processus de mondialisation ». Les marines asiatiques et notamment celle de la Chine populaire maîtrisent ce paramètre comme le montrent les déploiements chinois dans l’Océan Indien.

La marine chinoise va donc poursuivre son ascension dans le Pacifique et au-delà, même si les Etats-Unis devraient maintenir leur rang de numéro un mondial naval, en dépit d’une baisse de leurs moyens navals qui sera inévitable à l’horizon 2020. Il reste que les Etats-Unis peuvent s’appuyer sur des alliés. Sur les vingt flottes mondiales suivantes celle des Etats-Unis, pour ce qui est du tonnage cumulé, pas moins de dix-huit sont soit des alliées formelles des Etats-Unis, soit ont des liens d’amitié à leur égard. Celles de l’OTAN atteignent déjà des niveaux de coopération élevés avec la marine de guerre américaine. La dernière et nouvelle stratégie maritime, A cooperative strategy for the 21st century seapower, est expressément conçue pour étendre encore plus de tels niveaux de coopération (14).

 

La puissance maritime chinoise mettra donc encore des années si elle souhaite un jour s’imposer dans le Pacifique Ouest et au-delà.

 

(1) "Maritime surveillance forces will expand", Wang Qian, China Daily, 2 mai 2011

(2) « Les ambitions navales de la Chine », Le Monde diplomatique, septembre 2008

(3) Michael S. Chase, China’s Growing Naval Power, December 2010. Progressive Policy Institute

(4) Chiffres de la revue DSI. Hors série n°15. Chine. Le géant militaire du 21e siècle ? . Décembre 2010 – Janvier 2011

(5) « Chinese navy improves combat capability : white paper », Xinhua, Beijing, 31 mars 2011

(6) Milan Vego, « China’s naval challenge ». April 2011, US Naval Institute. Lire aussi : Ronald O’Rourke, « China Naval Modernization : implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities – Background and issues for Congress », CRS Report for Confress, 19 novembre 2008

(7) « Marines en Asie. Un équilibre en mutation ». in Guerre navale de surface, DSI, Hors série n°14 octobre – Novembre 2010

(8) Jen Alic, « Rising chinese navy challenges US power in Asia-Pacific, cementing military role for Guam », 22 février 2011, Guam Buildup News

(9) Didier Ortolland, Jean-Pierre Pirat, Atlas Géopolitique des espaces maritimes, Editions Technip, 2008.

(10) Yoichi Kato, “China’s naval expansion in the Western Pacific”, 29 janvier 2011, Asahi Shimbun

(11) Céline Pajon, « Le réarmement contrôlé du Japon », Politique étrangère 1 :2011, IFRI

(12) Joseph Henrotin, « L’accroissement de la flotte sous-marine japonaise. Quel niveau de forces en 2020 ? », DSI, mars 2011.

(13) Philippe Langloit, « Distribution de la puissance navale. Trois constats et leurs conséquences », in DSI. Hors série n°15. Chine. Le géant militaire du 21e siècle ? Décembre 2010 – Janvier 2011.

(14) Geoffrey Till, « Marines en Asie. Un équilibre en mutation », in Guerre navale de surface, DSI, Hors série n°14. Octobre – Novembre 2010

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 11:30

Australia DoD

 

26 May 2011 Stephen Smith MP Minister for Defence MIN663/11

 

The Minister for Defence Stephen Smith and the Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced the reallocation of construction work for the $8 billion Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Project.

 

Australia is constructing three AWDs based on a proven design from the Spanish Navy.  The ships are due to be delivered from December 2014.  When complete, the AWD will be one of the more capable types of warship of its size in the world.

 

The AWD Project is an important element of Force 2030.  The Government and Defence have been actively working with Defence Industry and the AWD Alliance, which is managing the AWD project, to deliver the project.  The AWD Alliance consists of ASC, the Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) and Raytheon.

 

Construction of the AWDs involves 90 separate steel blocks being built at three shipyards in Adelaide (ASC), Melbourne (BAE Systems) and Newcastle (Forgacs).  Three additional sonar block assemblies are being built in Spain and the United Kingdom.

 

The Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard is also building 14 steel blocks for the superstructure of two new 27,500 tonne Landing Helicopter Dock ships (LHDs) due for delivery in 2014 and 2015.

 

Last year the project encountered difficulties in relation to engineering and construction of some of the first AWD hull blocks.  To assist the AWD project schedule, earlier this year the AWD Alliance reallocated construction of nine steel blocks from BAE Systems in Melbourne to the Forgacs shipyard in Newcastle.

 

The Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard remains stretched, working on two major projects at the same time – steel blocks for the Air Warfare Destroyers and the superstructure and integration of the Landing Helicopter Dock Ships.

 

The Government, the AWD Alliance and BAE Systems take the schedule for both these important projects extremely seriously.

 

In February 2011, BAE Systems advised the AWD Alliance of potential schedule delays.  Over the last few months, the AWD Alliance and BAE Systems have been working closely to develop options to improve the production program.

 

In March, the Minister for Defence met with Guy Griffiths, the Group Managing Director - International of BAE Systems UK, in London to discuss this project.

 

The Minister for Defence Materiel has also met with the CEO of BAE Australia, Jim McDowell, on a number of occasions about this project.

 

Earlier this month BAE Systems presented the AWD Alliance with a plan to adjust its workload on the AWD Project.

 

The advice of the AWD Alliance is that if no action is taken to relieve the pressure on the Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard the first ship would be two years late, approximately 25 per cent over schedule.

 

The AWD Alliance (with the support of BAE Systems) therefore proposes to take the following action:

 

    Up to 13 steel blocks will be reallocated among the three Australian shipyards in Adelaide, Melbourne and Newcastle – seven for advanced fit out and six for construction; and

 

    Up to five steel blocks will be reallocated to Navantia in Ferrol, Spain.

 

These changes involve the reallocation of blocks for the first two ships only and are subject in the usual way to satisfactory commercial arrangements with the shipyards.

 

 BAE will complete the structural steel and initial outfitting work on the seven steel blocks it is currently working on, as well as all its work on the 14 blocks for the superstructure of the Landing Helicopter Dock Ships and the integration work.

 

A decision on the reallocation of blocks, if any, on the third AWD will be made later in the project.

 

This action will reduce the schedule risk to both this project and to the LHD ships project.

 

The AWD Alliance has advised that this action will reduce the delay of the completion of Ship 1 by up to 12 months, and of all three AWDs by up to 12 months.

 

It will also reduce the pressure on BAE Systems to complete the construction of the superstructure and the integration of Australia’s two new LHD ships.

 

Defence will plan its comprehensive options to manage the transition from the current Adelaide Class frigates to the AWDs taking into account the agreed reallocation of blocks.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 11:15

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Rafale2_ag1.jpg

 

May 27, 2011, THE TIMES OF INDIA

 

NEW DELHI: India and France have decided to further enhance their "strategic partnership" and deepen bilateral defence cooperation. This came after visiting French defence minister Gerard Longuet met his Indian counterpart A K Antony at South Block on Thursday.

 

Longuet's visit comes at a time when after the ongoing Rs 23,562-crore Scorpene submarine project underway at Mazagon Docks, France is eyeing two other major defence projects.

 

As reported by TOI earlier, the long-awaited deal with France for the upgrade of the 52 Mirage-2000 multi-role fighters in IAF's combat fleet, at a cost of around Rs 11,000 crore, is now headed for the final nod by the Cabinet Committee on Security.

 

Moreover, the French Rafale is now one of the two fighters left in the race to bag the Rs 42,000-crore project to supply 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) to IAF.

 

With the American F/A-18 'Super Hornet' and F-16 'Super Viper', Swedish Gripen (Saab), and Russian MiG-35 ( United Aircraft Corporation) ejected out of the hotly-contested race, the other contender left in the fray is the Eurofighter Typhoon.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2011 5 27 /05 /mai /2011 06:00

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2a/RAAF_Super_Hornet_Amberley.jpg

 

May 26, 2011 defpro.com

 

ARLINGTON, Texas | L-3 Link Simulation & Training (L-3 Link) announced today that a second F/A-18F Tactical Operational Flight Trainer (TOFT) has achieved ready-for-training status for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

 

The TOFT, which L-3 Link built under contract to and in conjunction with the Boeing Company, was also delivered with an additional brief/debrief system and a new Australian photo texture database using L-3 Link’s latest visual system techniques and tools. Both TOFTs are installed at RAAF Base Amberley and represent the first high-fidelity F/A-18F simulators to be operated by a foreign military.

 

"Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18F aircrews are now able to undergo a full spectrum of advanced tactical training on these high-technology simulators," said Leonard Genna, president of L-3 Link. "These TOFTs, which leverage our proven F/A-18 simulator common hardware and software baselines, are meeting the RAAF’s unique training requirements."

 

Each trainer is integrated with L-3 Link’s 360-degree SimuSphere visual display and SimuView image generator, which support training scenarios ranging from basic flight to multi-ship tactical employment. Boeing Training Systems and Services’ mission computer emulation, simulated radar, electronic countermeasures and Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System provide both pilots and air combat officers with a completely immersive training environment.

 

The two fully integrated mission briefing and debriefing systems capture all mission event data as F/A-18F aircrews undertake air-to-air and air-to-ground simulated exercises. Following mission execution, RAAF aircrews use L-3 Link’s debriefing system to evaluate their tactical performance and review lessons learned to maximize training exercises.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 18:35

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/mediafile/201105/26/P201105261411588926135419.jpg

 

Defense Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng hosts the

ministry's second regular press conference in Beijing,

May 25, 2011.

 

May 26, 2011 Source: chinadaily.com.cn

 

The development of China's "Online Blue Army" unit is for improving the defense capabilities of the People's Liberation Army (PLA), a Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman said on Wednesday, citied by Beijing News.

 

Launching the "Online Blue Army" is based on the PLA's needs, and enforcing the ability of Internet security protection is an important issue in its military training programs, Defense Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng said.

 

Geng's comments came in response to questions during the ministry's news conference in Beijing asking if the "Online Blue Army" is China's Internet squad aimed at carrying out attacks on other countries' Internet systems.

 

The PLA Daily reported earlier the PLA's Guangzhou command had invested tens of millions of yuan in building the specialized Internet squad.

 

Geng said Internet security has become an international concern which affects not only the society but the military sector, adding that China, armed with comparatively lax online security protection, is among the victims of Internet attacks.

 

The news conference was the second in what will be the ministry's regular briefings to be held on the last week of each month. The first briefing was held on April 27.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 18:30

 

26/05/11 By Greg Waldron Flight International

 

Taiwan still hopes to acquire 66 Lockheed Martin F-16 C/Ds, but Washington appears reluctant to move the deal forward and offend China.

 

Reports in Taiwan media have quoted Taiwan's ministry of national defence as saying it is still pushing to acquire the US aircraft, denying earlier reports that Taiwan was willing to accept a "watered down" deal for defence equipment from the USA.

 

"The report is not true," the ministry has reportedly said. "The country's position to seek eight diesel-powered submarines and F-16C/Ds has never changed. The deal is still in the US government's screening process. The ministry will keep pushing for the deal so as to meet Taiwan's self-defence demands."

 

The submarine sale was originally approved by former US president George Bush in 2001, but the agreement has yet to be finalised. The USA has not built diesel electric submarines since the 1960s, and European countries with leading diesel electric submarine technology such as Germany and France are wary of riling China.

 

Similar concerns in Washington about China's sensitivities appear to be delaying the F-16 C/D deal. During a recent visit to the USA, Chinese army chief Chen Bingde urged his hosts to cease arms sales to Taiwan, and review the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, which requires the USA to sell Taiwan arms of a defensive nature.

 

Taiwan's air force was considered superior to that of China as recently as 10 years ago, but today its F-16 A/Bs, Dassault Mirage 2000s and Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation Ching Kuo Indigenous Defence Fighters are increasingly opposed by modern Chinese air force types such as the Chengdu J-10, Shenyang J-11 (a copy of the Sukhoi Su-27), and the Sukhoi Su-30

 

In addition, China is conducting tests of the Chengdu J-20. Although experts question the aircraft's true stealth capabilities, the J-20 is a large aircraft and, if deployed, would likely be able to carry heavy weapons loads over long ranges. A recent Rand report said the J-20 would be ideal for mounting fast strikes against Taiwan and US bases in the Pacific.

 

Richard Bitzinger, senior fellow at Singapore's S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, doubts the F-16 C/D deal will go through. He noted that China is today much more assertive about suspending military exchanges with the USA, as it did in early 2010 when Washington approved a $6.1 billion arms package to Taiwan that included 60 Sikorsky UH-60M Black Hawk helicopters and 114 Lockheed Patriot PAC-3 missiles.

 

That sale also spurred Beijing to threaten sanctions against the US companies involved in the deal. This included Boeing, which sells large numbers of commercial aircraft to mainland airlines, Sikorsky parent United Technologies, and General Electric, which manufactures the UH-60M's T700 engines.

 

Although relations between China and Taiwan have improved in recent years, China has never forgone the option of using force to reacquire Taiwan, which it views as a breakaway province.

 

"At the end of the day, America is going to look out for its own interests first," says a Taiwan industry source.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 17:00

 

May 26, 2011 ASDNews Source : MoD Australia

 

The Minister for Defence Stephen Smith and the Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced the reallocation of construction work for the $8 billion Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Project.

 

Australia is constructing three AWDs based on a proven design from the Spanish Navy. The ships are due to be delivered from December 2014. When complete, the AWD will be one of the more capable types of warship of its size in the world.

 

The AWD Project is an important element of Force 2030. The Government and Defence have been actively working with Defence Industry and the AWD Alliance, which is managing the AWD project, to deliver the project. The AWD Alliance consists of ASC, the Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) and Raytheon.

 

Construction of the AWDs involves 90 separate steel blocks being built at three shipyards in Adelaide (ASC), Melbourne (BAE Systems) and Newcastle (Forgacs). Three additional sonar block assemblies are being built in Spain and the United Kingdom.

 

The Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard is also building 14 steel blocks for the superstructure of two new 27,500 tonne Landing Helicopter Dock ships (LHDs) due for delivery in 2014 and 2015.

 

Last year the project encountered difficulties in relation to engineering and construction of some of the first AWD hull blocks. To assist the AWD project schedule, earlier this year the AWD Alliance reallocated construction of nine steel blocks from BAE Systems in Melbourne to the Forgacs shipyard in Newcastle.

 

The Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard remains stretched, working on two major projects at the same time - steel blocks for the Air Warfare Destroyers and the superstructure and integration of the Landing Helicopter Dock Ships.

 

The Government, the AWD Alliance and BAE Systems take the schedule for both these important projects extremely seriously.

 

In February 2011, BAE Systems advised the AWD Alliance of potential schedule delays. Over the last few months, the AWD Alliance and BAE Systems have been working closely to develop options to improve the production program.

 

In March, the Minister for Defence met with Guy Griffiths, the Group Managing Director - International of BAE Systems UK, in London to discuss this project.

 

The Minister for Defence Materiel has also met with the CEO of BAE Australia, Jim McDowell, on a number of occasions about this project.

 

Earlier this month BAE Systems presented the AWD Alliance with a plan to adjust its workload on the AWD Project.

 

The advice of the AWD Alliance is that if no action is taken to relieve the pressure on the Melbourne BAE Systems shipyard the first ship would be two years late, approximately 25 per cent over schedule.

 

The AWD Alliance (with the support of BAE Systems) therefore proposes to take the following action:

 

Up to 13 steel blocks will be reallocated among the three Australian shipyards in Adelaide, Melbourne and Newcastle - seven for advanced fit out and six for construction; andUp to five steel blocks will be reallocated to Navantia in Ferrol, Spain.

 

These changes involve the reallocation of blocks for the first two ships only and are subject in the usual way to satisfactory commercial arrangements with the shipyards.

 

BAE will complete the structural steel and initial outfitting work on the seven steel blocks it is currently working on, as well as all its work on the 14 blocks for the superstructure of the Landing Helicopter Dock Ships and the integration work.

 

A decision on the reallocation of blocks, if any, on the third AWD will be made later in the project.

 

This action will reduce the schedule risk to both this project and to the LHD ships project.

 

The AWD Alliance has advised that this action will reduce the delay of the completion of Ship 1 by up to 12 months, and of all three AWDs by up to 12 months.

 

It will also reduce the pressure on BAE Systems to complete the construction of the superstructure and the integration of Australia's two new LHD ships.

 

Defence will plan its comprehensive options to manage the transition from the current Adelaide Class frigates to the AWDs taking into account the agreed reallocation of blocks.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 17:00

 

 

May 26, 2011 ASDNews Source : Saab AB

 

 

The first batch of Gripen fighters for the Royal Thai Air Force was delivered in February 2011. They are based at Wing 7 in Surat Thani in the southern part of the country. If you want to see some RTAF Gripen action, please click on the links to watch two newly produced videos showing them flying in the skies of Thailand.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 17:00

 

TAIPEI, Taiwan, May 26 (UPI)

 

Taiwan plans to spend $860 million to buy MK 54 and MK 48 torpedoes to replace aging U.S. and German weapons, the China Times newspaper said.

 

The purchase will be phased in over a decade, a report in the Chinese-language newspaper based in Taipei stated.

 

Around $300 million is earmarked to buy 600 MK 54 lightweight hybrid torpedoes to replace MK 46 anti-submarine torpedoes.

 

Another $160 million will be spent on 40 MK 48 heavyweight submarine-launched torpedoes designed to sink fast, deep-diving nuclear-powered submarines and high-performance surface ships.

 

The MK 48s will replace the navy's German-made SUT heavyweight torpedoes. The weapons came as a package when Taiwan bought two Hai Lung II submarines, a modified Zwaardvis-class vessel built for Taiwan by the Netherlands in the late 1980s.

 

Taiwanese defense officials also said $400 million will be spent on 100 MK 48 torpedoes for deployment on the navy's eight diesel-electric submarines it plans to purchase from the United States, although the submarine deal hasn't been finalized, the China Times said.

 

The MK 48 torpedo was designed in the end of the 1960s by Gould/Honeywell to match Soviet submarine technology and weapons. The 19-foot-long MK 46 with its 660-pound warhead has been operational since 1972 and is the standard heavyweight torpedo used by the U.S. military.

 

Now made by Hughes Aircraft, the MK 48 is launched from submarine torpedo tubes.

 

The MK 54 was co-developed by Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems and the U.S. Navy under the Navy's Lightweight Hybrid Torpedo program. In April 2003, Raytheon was awarded a sole-source contract for the production of the MK 54. Full rate production began in October 2004.

 

The MK 54 is versatile. It can be fired from surface ships using the MK 32 surface vessel torpedo tubes or the vertical launch anti-submarine rocket. It can also be launched from most systems and from most anti-submarine warfare aircraft.

 

Taiwan's plan follow on from a directive by Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou ordered the country's defense ministry in July to draft a draw up a shopping list of weapons that include MK 54 torpedoes, dozens of M1A2 tanks and amphibious landing vehicles.

 

If the MK 54 and MK 48 purchase goes through, Taiwan will phase out its older MK 46 torpedoes, the Taipei Daily newspaper reported in July. The MK 46 is aerial-launched from a surface ship and has been in production since 1967.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2598/5758957776_c082535c1c.jpg

 

May 26, 2011 Task Group 73.1 Public Affairs / NNS – defpro.com

 

JAKARTA, Indonesia | Three U.S. Navy ships arrived in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 25 for the beginning of the 17th annual Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Indonesia exercise.

 

The first phase of CARAT features events ashore, such as engineering and damage control training exchanges, joint medical, dental and civic action projects and joint community service projects at local schools.

 

The at-sea phase of CARAT focuses on developing maritime security capabilities in areas such as maritime interdiction, information sharing, combined operations at sea, patrols and gunnery exercises and anti-piracy and anti-smuggling exercises.

 

"We're looking forward to operating at sea with TNI-AL (Tentara Nasional Indonesia Angkatan Laut, also known as the Indonesian navy) ships this year," said Rear Adm. Thomas Carney, commander, Task Force 73 and the executive agent for the exercise. "The TNI-AL have a lot of experience with counter-piracy operations and patrolling some of the world's busiest waterways, and we're eager to practice these skills together."

 

"The U.S. Navy and TNI-AL have developed a robust training plan, and we expect both navies will learn a lot about each other throughout the exercise, but particularly at sea," said Carney.

 

Approximately 1,600 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel are participating in CARAT Indonesia 2011, which runs May 25 through June 1. U.S. Navy ships from Task Group 73.1 include amphibious dock landing ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46), guided-missile destroyer USS Howard (DDG 83) and frigate USS Reuben James (FFG 57).

 

Additional participants include an amphibious landing force of Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marines, U.S. Navy Seabees and P-3C Orion and SH-60 Sea Hawk aircraft.

 

CARAT is a series of bilateral military exercises between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Additionally, Vietnam participates in a CARAT-like skills exchange.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 11:30

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-o8vgaVQMDBg/Td2gkc7EQPI/AAAAAAAAJYc/IvuALLLj2gc/s400/t50.jpg

 

T-50 in production line (photo : KDN)


May 26, 2011 DEFENSE STUDIES

 

Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) signed a contract Wednesday to export its T-50 trainer jets to Indonesia, an official of the state-run aircraft maker said.

“Korea has signed a $400 million deal to export 16 T-50s,” Lee Kyung-ho, a spokesman of KAI said, noting that this is the first time for the country to export supersonic jets.

He said KAI will deliver 16 T-50 Golden Eagle supersonic trainer jets by 2013.

On April 12, Indonesia selected KAI as the preferred bidder for its trainer jet program over Russian’s Yakovlev Yak-130 and the Czech Republic’s Aero Vodochody L-159, the two other finalists in the competition.

Italy’s M-346, which defeated the T-50 in trainer jet acquisition deals in the United Arab Emirates in 2009 and Singapore in 2010, was disqualified from the competition in the first round of assessments in May last year.

The export of the T-50 was briefly thrown into question when Korean intelligence officials allegedly broke into the hotel room of a visiting Indonesian delegation in Seoul on Feb. 16.

Observers say that the deal will have positive effects on the country's efforts to export the aircraft to other nations, including Israel, the United States, Poland, India and the United Arab Emirates.

They say the strategic importance and close bilateral ties between Korea and Indonesia played a role in the decision-making process.

Indonesia and Korea are working together to jointly develop a new fighter.

Korea first unveiled the T-50 in 2005, becoming the world’s 12th supersonic jet producer.

(Korea Times)

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 07:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/China_Emblem_PLA.svg/631px-China_Emblem_PLA.svg.png

 

2011-05-26 (China Military News cited from CRIENGLISH.com)

 

China's Defense Ministry has now revealed that the PLA has established a "cyber blue team" to better safeguard the Internet security of the armed forces.

 

Ministry spokesperson Geng Yansheng admits the Chinese side is still relatively weak in Internet security protection.

 

Meanwhile, Geng Yansheng says Chinese Defense Minister Liang Guanglie has now been discussing issues connected to the South China Sea with the leaders from Indonesia and the Philippines.

 

"Indonesian side agreed that all relevant parties should try to safeguard the peace and stability of the South China Sea and hopes to solve the issue through bilateral negotiations. The Philippines side said the South China Sea is a region for cooperation not conflict. They hope all negotiators should recognize the differences and maintain dialogues to solve the issue peacefully."

 

He also says the defense minister will attend a regional security summit in Singapore, known as the Shangri-La Dialogue, early next month.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mai 2011 4 26 /05 /mai /2011 06:00

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/IA_Dhruv_Berlin-08.jpg

 

25 May 2011 by CAE

 

The Helicopter Academy to Train by Simulation of Flying (HATSOFF), the joint venture owned equally by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) and CAE, today announced that its simulator cockpit for the civil/conventional variant of the Dhruv has been certified to Level D, the highest qualification for flight simulators, by India’s Directorate General Civil Aviation (DGCA).

 

The civil/conventional Dhruv simulator cockpit has been integrated with the CAE-built full-mission simulator currently in operation at HATSOFF. The simulator features CAE's revolutionary roll-on/roll-off cockpit design, which enables cockpits representing various helicopter types to be used in the simulator. This is the world’s first-ever full-mission simulator for the HAL-built Dhruv helicopter.

 

“We are very proud of achieving Level D certification for the world’s first simulator representing the indigenously developed HAL Dhruv helicopter,” said Wg Cdr (Retd) Chandra Datt Upadhyay Vr.C., Chief Executive Officer of HATSOF. “We look forward to welcoming the Indian Air Force and other civil operators of the Dhruv in offering simulation-based training that will undoubtedly prove to be a safe and cost-effective method for training Dhruv helicopter aircrews.”

 

The cockpit for the civil/conventional variant of the Dhruv is the second for the HATSOFF training centre. The first cockpit for the simulator represented the Bell 412 helicopter and training for Bell 412 operators began in July 2010. Additional cockpits for the Indian Army/Air Force variant of the HAL-built Dhruv and the Eurocopter Dauphin will be added to the HATSOFF training centre over the next year.

 

The HATSOFF training centre, located near HAL’s headquarters in Bengaluru, also features multimedia classrooms, computer-based training, brief/debrief facilities, a training management information system and crew accommodations. The full-mission simulator features a common motion system, vibration platform, and visual display system, along with the four separate cockpit modules that can be used in the full-mission simulator. When a cockpit is not used in the full-mission simulator, it will be used as a fixed-based flight training device (FTD).

 

About CAE

 

CAE is a world leader in providing simulation and modelling technologies and integrated training solutions for the civil aviation industry and defence forces around the globe. With annual revenues exceeding C$1.6 billion, CAE employs more than 7,500 people at more than 100 sites and training locations in more than 20 countries. We have the largest installed base of civil and military full-flight simulators and training devices. Through our global network of 32 civil aviation, military and helicopter training centres, we train more than 80,000 crewmembers yearly. We also offer modelling and simulation software to various market segments, and through CAE's professional services division we assist customers with a wide range of simulation-based needs. www.cae.com

 

About HAL

 

Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) is a premier aeronautical complex of SE Asia, with 19 production divisions and ten R&D centres. HAL's expertise encompasses design, production, repair, overhaul and upgrade of Aircraft, Helicopters, Aero-engines, Accessories, Avionics and Systems. HAL today provides one stop solutions for all the design needs of aircraft & helicopters in airframes, airframe systems, avionics, mission & combat systems using advanced design tools. The 19 manufacturing divisions of HAL are equipped with modern infrastructure with modern plant and machinery for production of fighter aircraft, trainer aircraft and helicopters. The current workforce is around 35,000 with over 50% having more than a decade of aircraft industry experience. It has also diversified into manufacture and repair/overhaul of Industrial & Marine Gas Turbine engines, and manufacture of structures for aerospace vehicles. www.hal-india.com

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 20:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ed/Nirmalkumarverma.jpg

 

25 May, 2011 THE ECONOMIC TIMES

 

NEW DELHI: Marking a modernisation spree, Indian Navy is constructing 34 ships and submarines and is in the process of acquiring aircraft, destroyers and missiles to equip it to meet all challenges.

 

Addressing top Naval Commanders here, Defence Minister A K Antony today said thrust was being given to indigenous capabilities while modernising the force.

 

"34 ships and submarines are in various stages of construction at different shipyards. A large number of contracts have been concluded for acquisition of aircraft, destroyers, fleet tankers, jet trainers, missiles, UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) and radars," he said.

 

Navy Chief Admiral Nirmal Verma yesterday said almost all the naval ships planned to be inducted in the next 15 years would be built in India.

 

Besides inducting new assets, India is also focusing on revamping its indigenous ship-building capabilities.

 

As part of this, Antony last week commissioned the first-of-its-kind and the biggest ship-lift system at Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL), which will significantly reduce the time and effort in repairing ships and constructing new ones.

 

With a Rs 800 crore and four-phased modernisation plan, GSL is expected to augment its capacity to fabricate and construct steel, aluminium and hull of the naval vessels to nearly three times.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 17:30

http://www.usinenouvelle.com/mediatheque/3/6/1/000139163_5.jpg

 

25 mai 2011 par Guillaume Lecompte-Boinet L’USINE NOUVELLE

 

L'appel d'offre indien pour l'achat de 126 avions de combat est entré dans une nouvelle phase. Baptisée L 1 par le ministère indien de la Défense, cette compétition oppose en finale le Rafale de Dassault à l'Eurofighter du trio EADS-BAE-Finmeccanica. Retour sur les conditions d'un duel très serré.

 

Dans le face à face Rafale-Eurofighter, il n'est plus question désormais d'essais en vol.  Les avionneurs des deux chasseurs vont peaufiner leur proposition commerciale et leurs offres en matière de transferts de technologie.

 

Les Indiens se donnent quelques mois pour trancher, et donner leur décision d'ici –théoriquement - mars 2012. Théoriquement, car tous les spécialistes de l'Inde savent que dans ce pays, le temps n'a pas la même valeur qu'en Occident. Certains appels d'offre ont duré plusieurs années, voire des décennies avant qu'un contrat en bonne et due forme soit signé.

 

C'est pourquoi Français et Allemands ont été surpris de la relative rapidité avec laquelle les officiels indiens ont sélectionné en finale le Rafale et l'Eurofighter-Typhoon, représenté par EADS Allemagne. Entre le lancement de l'appel d'offre fin 2007, et cette décision, il s'est écoulé à peine quatre ans.

 

Ce délai, qui peut paraître long, est assez normal quand il faut tester six avons très différents : outre le Rafale et l'Eurofighter-Typhoon, il y avait le F/A 18 de Boeing, le F 16 de Lookheed Martin, le Gripen du suédois Saab et le MIG 35 russe.

 

Les évaluations en vol, qui ont eu lieu au cours du printemps et de l'été 2010, ont duré plus d'un mois pour chaque avion en lice. Chacun est passé à la queue-leu-leu, le F/A 18, puis le F 16, le Gripen, le Rafale, le Typhoon enfin le Mig.

 

Les pilotes indiens n'ont pas chômé ! Toutes les configurations ont été testées : vol à très haute altitude, à basse altitude, en milieu désertique, atterrissage d'urgence, arrêt et redémarrage des moteurs…

 

un timing très serré

 

De même, les Indiens ont tiré des armements, missiles et canon. Ils ont passé au peigne fin les capacités de déploiement des avions avec leurs équipes de maintenance et les mécanos, avec par exemple, un chronométrage des temps de pose-dépose des moteurs.

 

Toute annulation d'un vol pour des raisons techniques – et cela peut arriver dans ce genre d'évaluation - a été prise en compte. Selon certaines sources, le Rafale et le Typhoon auraient marqué de précieux points sur ce type de critères. "Un client potentiel ne veut pas seulement un avion de chasse super-performant, il veut aussi une machine fiable et dont le coût d'utilisation soit raisonnable sur au moins 30 ans", indique un connaisseur.

 

Les avions en lice ont aussi été confrontés aux Mig indiens dans des simulations de combats aériens. Et pour que tout cela soit possible, les pilotes indiens ont dû se rendre dans chaque pays concernés pour se former, sur simulateurs et en vol réel. Dassault les a accueillis sur son site d'Istres début 2009, soit plus d'un an avant les évaluations elles-mêmes. Un vrai marathon !

 

Mais un autre commencera dès 2012. En effet, le gagnant de la compétition disposera d'un timing très serré pour livrer le premier avion puisque les Indiens ont indiqué le vouloir pour 2014. Or en général, il faut au moins trois ans et demi pour mettre au point le premier exemplaire d'un chasseur acheté par un pays étranger.

 

La raison : il y a toujours des développements complémentaires réclamés par le pays client, portant notamment sur les systèmes embarqués. On n'a pas fini d'entendre parler de cette compétition.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 17:00

http://rpmedia.ask.com/ts?u=/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d8/Flag_of_the_Republic_of_Korea_Armed_Forces.svg/232px-Flag_of_the_Republic_of_Korea_Armed_Forces.svg.png

 

May 25, 2011 defpro.com

 

The Minister of National Defense said on May 17 that the government's military reform plan can be achieved if active-duty and retired officers become one.

 

The Defense Ministry invited retired Army, Navy and Air Force generals to the ministry to brief them on the government's defense reform amid backlash from some retired generals.

 

Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin, far right standing at the podium, briefs retired generals on the government's defense reform measures on May 17 at the ministry in Seoul.

 

The reform measures, unveiled by the Defense Minister Kim in March in response to North Korea's two deadly attacks last year, call for the military to streamline its top command structure and give more power to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to enhance the interoperability of the Army, Navy and Air Force.

 

Some retired generals have publicly voiced opposition to the reform measures, claiming that the moves could weaken the commanding authority of chiefs of Navy and Air Force. Four-star Army generals, traditionally, have assumed the chairmanship of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

 

The brief session on the defense reform was organized to explain the outline of reform measures under the 'Defense Reform Basic Plan 2011-2030' and collect opinions from retired generals.

 

"Until the last moment of completing the reform plan, we will keep on making opportunities to listen opinions from retired generals," said Kim.

 

The minister also said that it is very important to listen all different opinions on the military reform matter from retired generals since the defense issue is crucial in national security and it needs to be dealt in perfect fashion. Kim said the ministry plans to hold a large-scale debate session on the defense reform in early next month.

 

"We will do our best to collect as many views toward the reform plan as possible throughout the process of the plan," Kim said.

 

Also in his briefing, Kim emphasized that the defense reform is aimed at changing the military into a stronger and combat-oriented organization before the transfer of the wartime operational control from the United States to Korea scheduled in 2015.

 

"We are pushing ahead with the military reform for the sake of the future of our armed forces and the country," said Kim. "Military reforms come up at the request of the people, so we need to thoroughly implement the reforms to make the military stronger, speedier and slimmer. We urge you to keep on encouraging and supporting the military's effort on the plan."

 

Some 140 retired general-grade officers attended the briefing session, but former four-star generals of the Navy and Air Force did not show up in the session, in an apparent show of opposition. Only former Chief of Naval Operations Kim Jong-ho attended as a representative of the Korea Retired Generals and Admirals Association.

 

"Active-duty and retired officers should not show divisions," said Kim Jong-ho. "The ministry needs to show its effort to listen opinions of the minority as well."

 

Park Se-hwan, chairman of the Korea Veterans Association, said, "Since 2012 can be a year with security concern, we need to be well-prepared. Along with the reform plan, preparation of the wartime operational control transition must be conducted well."

 

Ret. Army Lt. Gen. Kim Chung-bae said, "It is regrettable that the comments of certain retired generals are seen as the selfishness of their own group."

 

A defense official at the ministry said that the most of attendants at the session understood ministry's briefing on the reform plan well and showed reaction that many doubts have been resolved.

 

"The ministry will do its best to draw many retired Navy and Air Force general-grade officers to attend a scheduled brief session next month," the official said. "Even after completing three briefing sessions, we are planning to explain the reform measures through various channels and listen to different opinions from the retired generals."

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 17:00

http://www.aeroplans.fr/images/aeroplans/libye-avions-rafale-france-frappes-bormbardements.jpg

 

Rafale et Mirage 2000D en route pour la Libye - Crédit Armée de l'air

 

24 Mai 2011 Aeroplans

 

Analyse - Après avoir été décrit  comme inefficace à une certaine époque, il semblerait que le lobbying français en Inde porte désormais ses fruits puisque deux très bonnes nouvelles pour l’industrie aéronautique française ont été annoncées à quelques semaines d’intervalles.

 

La première fait état de la présélection de l’avion phare de Dassault, le Rafale, pour le méga contrat MMRCA. La seconde concerne quant à elle la modernisation de la flotte des Mirage 2000H de New Dehli, qui servira entre autres à faire patienter les forces aérienne du pays en attendant le vainqueur de la compétition MMRCA.

 

Le Rafale et l’Eurofighter « short-listés »

 

C’est fin avril que l’information a filtré dans la presse spécialisée. L’Inde aurait désormais restreint le nombre de candidats potentiels à ce que certains décrivent comme le contrat du siècle. En effet, celui-ci consiste en la livraison de 126 avions de combats de quatrième génération, le tout pour un montant de plus de 10 milliards de dollars. Ces avions remplaceront notamment la flotte des antiques Mig-21 dont la valeur militaire devient plus que douteuse.

 

Bien que l’information n’ait pas fait l’objet d’annonce officielle de la part du Ministère de la Défense indiens, un haut responsable a « confirmé que l’Eurofighter et le Rafale sont sélectionnés et que les quatre autres candidats sont rejetés ». Parmi ces derniers figurent le Gripen de Saab, le Mig-35, le F-18 E/F de Boeing ainsi qu’une variante du F-16 de Lockheed Martin proche de celle des Block 60 émiratis. Si le gouvernement indien n’a fait aucune déclaration, l’ambassade américaine à New Dehli a quant à elle confirmé que les appareils américains ont bien été exclus de la compétition, provoquant une « grande déception » à Washington, selon l’ambassadeur Timothy Roemer. Saab a également confirmé son élimination le lendemain.

 

Un processus de sélection « juste et transparent »

 

 Ce sera donc une finale 100% européenne à laquelle nous assisterons durant les prochains mois, pour une signature de contrat espérée en mars 2012. Contrairement à la plupart des contrats précédents dans le monde, il semblerait que la sélection se soit faite sur des critères purement techniques et non politiques. Ainsi, les militaires indiens auraient établi une liste de 643 critères afin de déterminer lequel des appareils était le plus performant. Le gouvernement indien aurait assuré à l’ambassadeur américain que le processus de sélection a été et sera juste et transparent. La sélection du Rafale et de l’Eurofighter est dans ce cas somme toute logique puisque le Gripen est plus petit qu’eux, et possède donc une capacité d’emport en carburant et armements moindre, tandis que les trois autres concurrents ne sont que des versions modernisées d’appareils datant de la fin des années 70.

 

Outre le fait que les deux concurrents européens soient désormais en bonne position pour remporter ce contrat, cette présélection apparemment purement technique pourrait également servir à des Etats n’ayant pas les moyens de mener une telle étude comparative. Ceux-ci attendraient donc de savoir qui gagnera la compétition pour ensuite faire leur choix. Le gagnant se verrait ainsi gratifier de plusieurs contrats. D’où l’extrême importance qu’accordent les constructeurs à cette compétition.

 

Et pendant ce temps...

 

En parallèle à ce méga-contrat, les industriels français étaient également en compétition pour la modernisation de la flotte de Mirage 2000H indiens. Cela faisait quatre ans que Dassault, associé à Thales et MBDA, affrontait le groupe israélien Elbit Systems Ltd pour ce contrat de 2,1 milliards de dollars. Celui-ci porte sur la modernisation de 51 appareils et vise à les modifier en profondeur en les faisant passer au standard Mirage 2000-5 Mk2. Cela consiste notamment à remplacer le radar actuel par le RDY-3 multi-modes / multi-cibles de Thales, à installer un nouveau cockpit tout écran, ainsi qu’à moderniser le système de combat et de contre-mesures électroniques. Les appareils indiens seront également dotés d’une liaison de données ainsi que d’un viseur de casque. Les services du Premier Ministre français chargés de l’exportation des armements ont par ailleurs donné leur accord pour la fourniture de missiles air-air moyenne portée MICA de MBDA ainsi que d'autres munitions guidées.

 

Après la signature du contrat d’ici à trois mois, les intégrateurs principaux que sont Thales et Dassault seront chargés de moderniser les quatre premiers appareils en France, puis les 47 restants le seront par l’industriel indien HAL, les derniers appareils devant être livrés d’ici à 5 ans.

 

Un choix de bon augure ?

 

Là encore, on peut se réjouir que l’Inde ait fait le choix de la solution la plus technologiquement avancée et non de la moins chère. Hors, certains voient en ce premier contrat une préparation à la victoire du Rafale face à l’Eurofighter. En effet, de nombreux systèmes sont à la fois présents sur le Mirage 2000-5 Mk2 et sur le dernier né de Dassault, notamment en ce qui concernent l’armement. Choisir le Rafale serait donc gage d’économies en termes de maintenance. Hors le Maintient en Condition Opérationnel (MCO) est justement pris en compte dans la compétition MMRCA. Et ce sans tenir compte du fait que le Rafale a presque toujours terrassé son opposant lors de combats simulés.

 

De plus, le conflit en Libye a une fois de plus démontré tout le potentiel de l’appareil français, qui a été apte à mener quasiment l’ensemble des missions possibles pour un avion de combat, que ce soit en supériorité aérienne, en bombardement stratégique, en reconnaissance ou en soutien aérien, et même en tant ravitailleur en vol ! Seules les frappes anti-navires et nucléaires manquent à l’appel (fort heureusement). Pendant ce temps, l’Eurofighter peine à se départir de son rôle de pur chasseur issu de la Guerre Froide, bien qu’il ait enfin pu mener des missions d’attaques au sol plusieurs semaines après le début du conflit.

 

Ainsi, si le processus de sélection indien se poursuit sur des critères purement techniques, on ne peut qu'être confiants quant à l’issue de la compétition. Mais les nombreux contrats prétendument gagnés d’avance par le Rafale pour être finalement ravis par d’autres doivent cependant nous inciter à la plus grande prudence. Nous ne pourrons nous réjouir qu’à la signature définitive du contrat, voir qu’à la livraison des premiers appareils.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://celinetabou.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/barack-obama-hu-jintao.jpg

 

25 mai 2011 Mon Blog Défense

 

Alors que le chef d'Etat-major chinois, Chen Bingde, rentre d'une visite aux Etats-Unis, Taiwan a réaffirmé en fin de semaine dernière, par la voix de son ministre de la défense, ne pas renoncer à l'achat de huit sous-marins conventionnels américains et d'une soixantaine de F-16 à la première puissance mondiale.

 

L'accord initial sur les sous-marins, signé en 2001 par George Bush, a peu progressé depuis, notamment parce que les Américains n'ont plus fabriqué de navires conventionnels depuis des lustres, mais également à cause de la posture de la Chine. Rappelons que Taiwan est le seul ennemi stratégique de l'Empire du Milieu, qui a fait de sa réintégration pleine et entière à la mère patrie l'un de ses objectifs principaux (voir d'ailleurs Taiwan peut-elle mourir à petit feu ?). L'Allemagne et l'Espagne, puissances industrielles navales, ont ainsi renoncé à fournir des plans, par peur de la réaction du nouveau géant asiatique.
On se souvient qu'en janvier 2010, Beijing avait rompu toute coopération militaire et sécuritaire avec les USA car ces derniers avaient approuvé une vente d'armes de plus de 6 milliards de dollars à l'île rebelle (voir Taiwan vaut-elle une guerre (froide) ?).
Toujours est-il que selon le Liberty Times, un journal taiwanais qui dit s'appuyer sur un rapport des services de renseignement, 1800 missiles chinois seront bientôt pointés vers l'île, malgré le relatif réchauffement entre les deux frères ennemis depuis l'élection de Ma Ying-jeou en 2008. De quoi relativiser, pour ceux qui y croient encore, le "soft power" à la chinoise...
Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://media2.intoday.in/indiatoday/images/stories/paknavybase398_052411103848.jpg

 

One of the two P3C-Orion surveillance aircraft destroyed

by the terrorists at the Pakistan base.

 

May 24, 2011 India Today

 

India has revised the level of alert near its naval bases following the terrorist attack on a key aviation base of the Pakistan navy in Karachi.

 

The attack on Pakistan Naval Station (PNS) Mehran, a strategic airbase, is being viewed by the Indian navy as a big blow to its arch-rival's maritime capability.

 

Two P3C Orion surveillance aircraft, a crucial naval aviation asset, were destroyed in the attack by militants belonging to Pakistani Taliban. Security at three Indian naval aviation bases - INS Hansa in Goa, Dega in Vishakhapatnam and Rajali near Chennai - has been beefed up.

 

Indian officials, who constantly monitored the situation, pointed out that the government would analyse the attack and take lessons from it that would contribute in boosting coastal security.

 

The government had undertaken a slew of measures to boost security along the huge coastline, including providing more teeth to coastal police stations in the aftermath of the 26/ 11 terrorist attack. However, officials accompanying Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on his visit to Africa pointed out that all states have not reacted adequately to the threat from the seas. " We will now again have a review and beef up coastal security further," the officials informed.

 

India had raised concerns about the sale of P3C Orion maritime surveillance aircraft by the US to Pakistan as part of its military aid package that came as a "reward" for participating in the campaign against terrorism.

 

India had argued that these modern aircraft had nothing to do with fighting terrorism. But the US had claimed that the aircraft will improve Pakistan's ability to restrict movement of terrorists along its southern border and also help in maritime interdiction operations.

 

Sources said the destruction of two P3C Orions was a big setback to Pakistan as the planes have the capability to take on both submarines and surface targets over a long range. Pakistan had contracted for 10 of these aircraft.

 

Two were delivered last year and the rest were to be supplied by 2012.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ea/Flag_of_Indian_Army.svg/800px-Flag_of_Indian_Army.svg.png

 

2011-05-25 (China Military News cited from indiatimes.com)

 

India and China will hold their annual defence dialogue (AAD) later this year "at a mutually convenient date", even as an Indian Army delegation is all set to visit Beijing next month to resume military-to-military ties after a year-long freeze.

 

This year's AAD, which was to be chaired by defence secretary Pradeep Kumar and his Chinese counterpart Ma Xiaotian, has been delayed since there "were some problems with scheduling it earlier", said a defence ministry official on Tuesday.

 

Rejecting reports that the AAD had been cancelled, he said, "Schedules were packed on the Indian side because of several engagements, including talks with Pakistan. Extensive consultations are in progress with China now to arrive at a mutually-acceptable date for the AAD later this year."

 

India had put bilateral defence exchanges with China on hold since July last year after Beijing refused "a proper stamped visa" to the then Northern Army Commander Lt-Gen B S Jaswal since he headed troops in Jammu and Kashmir.

 

But the freeze is set to be over now, with another senior Indian officer, Major-General Gurmeet Singh, also serving in J&K, to lead a delegation to China from June 19 to 23. Maj-Gen Singh is the commander of the Delta Force, a part of the specialised anti-insurgency Rashtriya Rifles deployed in J&K.

 

The two sides, however, are yet to decide on when and where the third edition of their joint 'hand-in-hand' (HiH) army exercise should take place this year. The first HiH exercise was held at Kunming in China in December 2007, while the second one took place at the Belgaum commando school in Karnataka in December 2008.

 

Though the HiH exercises have so far been largely symbolic in nature, with just over 100 soldiers participating from each side, they are seen to be an important CBM between the two countries which fought a bloody war in 1962.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mai 2011 3 25 /05 /mai /2011 12:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5c/Indian_Navy_crest.svg/498px-Indian_Navy_crest.svg.png

 

May 25, 2011 defpro.com

 

India's top Navy commanders on Tuesday discussed the security scenario and naval preparedness with Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Nirmal Verma underlining the need to pay maximum attention to maintenance of the force's war fighting capabilities.

 

Addressing the four day-long Naval Commander's Conference, Admiral Verma said the Navy must remain prepared to deploy ships, submarines and aircrafts at "immediate notice".

 

"With the security situation being fluid, we need to maintain the organisational ability to deploy ships, submarines and aircraft at immediate notice," he said addressing the biannual conference.

 

Amid Navy's growing involvement in coastal and maritime security, Admiral Verma drew the Commanders' attention to the fact that maintenance of war fighting abilities remains the top priority despite the fact it has large number of peacetime commitments at hand.

 

The CNS further said that due to increasing demand of maritime security, the naval personnel are spending longer hours and many more days at sea.

 

Over the four days, the Navy will examine and review its operational readiness and assess its ability to tackle current and emerging challenges.

 

On coastal security, Verma stressed on the need for maintaining a high level of effectiveness with increased patrolling and synergised efforts with all the stakeholders like Coast Guards, Marine Police, Customs and Sagar Prahri Bal.

 

He also stressed that the ongoing anti-piracy operations of the Indian Navy will also need to be sustained.

 

On need for maintaining Navy's network centric capability for seamless and swift operations, he stressed on the need to have a proper security for such systems and mechanisms.

 

Navy recently showcased its network centric capabilities during the TROPEX exercise in February this year.

 

On progress of naval ship-building in the country, Verma stated that almost all the warships ships planned to be inducted in the next 15 years would be built in India.

 

The Navy will also review its material and logistics preparedness during the conference. (DD India)

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories