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16 septembre 2013 1 16 /09 /septembre /2013 07:20
Boeing delivers last USAF C-17

15 September 2013 By Dave Majumdar – FG

 

Boeing delivered the last C-17 Globemaster III strategic airlifter destined for the US Air Force on 12 September at its plant in Long Beach, California.

 

The aircraft is the last of 223 examples ordered with the service, but production continues for foreign orders of the aircraft.

 

“We are continuing the legacy by building C-17s for our partner nations, and we will continue to work with the U.S. Air Force to ensure their aircraft deliver top performance into the future,” says Nan Bouchard, Boeing’s C-17 programme manager.

 

There are 34 additional C-17s being operated by Australia, Canada, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the UK, NATO’s 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability and India. Production of C-17s continues for India.

 

Boeing had said previously that it expects further foreign orders for the aircraft.

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5 septembre 2013 4 05 /09 /septembre /2013 17:35
C-17 Globemaster III  Indian Air Force – photo Rishika Baruah source Livefist

C-17 Globemaster III Indian Air Force – photo Rishika Baruah source Livefist

NEW DELHI, Sept. 5 (UPI)

 

The Indian Air Force officially inducted the first three Boeing C-17 Globemaster III transporters this week.

 

Boeing delivered the three -- the first of 10 C-17 aircraft on order -- during the past three months, a report by NDTV said.

 

Two more are expected by the end of the year and the last five will be delivered by the end of next year.

 

The aircraft is capable of lifting tanks to the border with China and Pakistan and made its debut with a test flight at the Hindon Air Base in Uttar Pradesh state.

 

"The C-17 Globe Master transport aircraft will change the way we deploy forces in the north and northeast," Air Chief Marshal N.A.K. Browne said on Monday during the induction.

 

India's Defense Acquisition Council approved the purchase in October 2009 to replace the air force's aging Russian IL-76 transporters that it bought in the 1990s.

 

The air force has fewer than 20 of Ilyushins which have a 45-ton cargo capacity and needs a crew of six.

 

The force also has the Russian Antonov-32 in its inventory.

 

A report by India Today said the acquisition of the C-17 Aircraft, and the Boeing C-130J Super Hercules transporter, shows the air force is moving away from reliance on Russian-origin aircraft toward American ones.

 

India operates six C-130Js and plans to buy six more for operations on small and unpaved runways alongside routine transport missions.

 

The C-17 carries up to 80 tons and needs a crew of three. One person can operate the heavy-lift hydraulics for cargo handling.

 

The high-wing, 4-engine, T-tailed Globemaster -- powered by four Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofan engines -- needs a 7,600-foot airfield to take off. But it can land in less than 3,000 feet on a small unpaved or paved airfield, day or night.

 

It also carries a payload of 160,000 pounds, flies 2,400 nautical miles and can refuel in flight.

 

Boeing recently said that the deal with India includes an Integrated Sustainment Program Performance-Based Logistics contract which, with other customers, has maintained a fleet availability of 85 percent.

 

The C-17 has been in operation since 1991 and has more than 2.6 million flight-hours, Boeing says on its website.

 

Boeing has delivered 256 C-17s, including 222 to the U.S. Air Force. The rest have gone to and Australia, Canada, India, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of NATO and Partnership for Peace nations.

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28 août 2013 3 28 /08 /août /2013 07:35
India's third C-17 Globemaster III aircraft departing Boeing's Long Beach facility in US. Photo Boeing.

India's third C-17 Globemaster III aircraft departing Boeing's Long Beach facility in US. Photo Boeing.

27 August 2013 airforce-technology.com

 

Boeing has handed over the third C-17 Globemaster III heavy-lift transport aircraft to the Indian Air Force (IAF), expanding the IAF's tactical airlifter fleet.

 

The shipment of the aircraft from Boeing's manufacturing facility in Long Beach, California, on 20 August, comes in less than one month of delivery of the second aircraft.

 

Around ten C-17 aircraft were ordered by IAF from Boeing through a $4.1bn deal for replacement of its ageing Russian IL-76 airlifter fleet, in June 2011.

 

Delivered in June, the first aircraft was immediately deployed in support of IAF operations.

 

The C-17 aircraft are expected to be operated in support of military and humanitarian airlift operations during emergencies from Hindon Air Force Base in New Delhi, India.

 

Powered by four Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofan engines, the C-17 Globemaster is a military tactical transport aircraft designed to conduct rapid strategic airlift of troops and supply palleted cargo to main operating bases or forward-operating bases in extreme climates worldwide.

 

Capable of transporting large payloads across vast ranges and landing on short, sharp runways, the aircraft is also capable of performing tactical airlift, medical evacuation and airdrop missions.

 

Besides IAF, the aircraft is also operated by air forces in the US, Australia, UAE, Canada and Qatar, UAE, the UK and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of Nato and Partnership for Peace nations.

 

Boeing is scheduled to deliver an additional two aircraft to IAF this year, followed by the remaining five in 2014.

 

The company is also supporting the IAF C-17 fleet through the Globemaster III integrated sustainment program (GISP) performance-based logistics contract, which ensures mission readiness by enabling access to an extensive support network for global parts availability and economies of scale.

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25 juillet 2013 4 25 /07 /juillet /2013 17:35
source Livefist

source Livefist

23 Jul 2013 by Greg Waldron – FG

 

Singapore - India has taken delivery of its second Boeing C-17 Globemaster III strategic transport. The new aircraft will enter service immediately, says Boeing.

 

New Delhi will receive three more C-17s this year, followed by five more in 2014, under a 10-aircraft deal signed in 2012.

 

"C-17s have an important role in supporting unique Indian air force operations in remote locations, such as the Himalayas and desert environments," says Nan Bouchard, Boeing vice-president and C-17 programme manager. "The C-17 provides the versatility to complete any mission, anywhere. We look forward to working with the Indian air force and the US Air Force as we deliver the remainder of India's fleet."

 

New Delhi received its first C-17 in June 2013. It is also considering the purchase of an additional six C-17s.

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19 février 2013 2 19 /02 /février /2013 13:45

http://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/image_data/file/6563/s300_MNT-20130211-019-Unclass-073.jpg

Troops from Ghana prepare to fly into Mali on a

99 Squadron C-17 - Picture ABIPP RAF, MOD 2013

 

18 February 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

The UK will contribute 40 people to the European Union Training Mission in Mali, the Defence Secretary has announced.

 

The objective of the EU Training Mission is to enable the Malian authorities to restore democratic order, re-establish the state’s authority and neutralise organised crime and the terrorist threat.

 

An infantry training team and a mortar and artillery training team will deploy to Mali to work with Malian Armed Forces personnel currently fighting violent extremists in the African country.

 

The UK will not be providing troops in a combat role or force protection for the mission - that role is being carried out by French and Czech personnel - but will provide 4 headquarters staff and 3 civilians under the Foreign & Commonwealth Office’s ‘Preventing sexual violence initiative’ who will be responsible for human rights and gender awareness training.

Twenty-one troops from 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment will carry out the infantry training and 12 personnel the mortar and artillery training.

 

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:

British personnel will play an important role in the EU Training Mission, enabling the Malian authorities to restore order and deny a safe haven to terrorists.

 

This mission is a further demonstration of our commitment to tackle violent extremism and the threat that it poses to our national interests.

The EU Training Mission is being launched in Brussels today and marks a significant partnership between the UK and the Republic of Ireland. Ireland will contribute 6 infantry training personnel to augment the UK infantry training team.

Mr Hammond continued:

We welcome the Irish contribution which will help develop further working relations between our 2 countries.

Last month 2 RAF C-17 aircraft were deployed in a logistical role to support the French intervention, delivering troops and equipment, and a Sentinel aircraft has been providing intelligence and surveillance support.

 

And since then, as well as offering the 40 personnel confirmed by the EU mission launch today, the UK is offering up to 200 training personnel to English-speaking nations neighbouring Mali. While these negotiations are ongoing, an RAF C-17 aircraft has been used at Ghana’s request to deliver around 120 Ghanaian engineering troops to Mali to support African-led training.

 

An advance party of the EU Training Mission has deployed and the main contingent is due to deploy later in the spring.

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14 février 2013 4 14 /02 /février /2013 19:45

http://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/image_data/file/6542/s300_MNT-20130211-019-Unclass-108g.jpg

Lieutenant Colonel Mustapha of the Ghanian Army talks

to his first group of soldiers prior to their departure for

Mali on an RAF 99 Squadron C-17 aircraft

Picture: Sergeant Ralph Merry RAF, MOD 2013]

 

14 February 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

A Royal Air Force C-17 aircraft has flown Ghanaian troops to Bamako in Mali as part of the UK's support for the international intervention in the country.

 

The transport aircraft flew more than 120 soldiers of Ghana’s Engineering Company 1 to Mali’s capital with vehicles and equipment in response to a request for assistance from Ghana.

 

They will build accommodation and support engineering projects as part of the African-led International Support Mission to Mali (AFISMA).

 

The UK, concerned by the situation in Mali and the threat that violent extremist groups in the north pose. The UK is assisting the Ghanaians by making a C-17 aircraft available this week.

 

Minister for the Armed Forces, Andrew Robathan, met RAF crew members working on the airlift at Bamako during a 2-day visit.

 

He said:

I came out on behalf of the government to see first-hand what is happening out here, where our troops are deploying, where there’s a huge French presence and where there is a terrorist situation that actually threatens the United Kingdom as well.

 

We have said we don’t want to have troops on the ground but we are helping the French effort and we’re helping the African effort as well. We’re going to help train Malians with the EU training mission too.

 
A fully loaded RAF 99 Squadron C-17 aircraft
A fully loaded RAF 99 Squadron C-17 aircraft carries the first deployment of Ghanian troops into Mali [Picture: Sergeant Ralph Merry RAF, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]

The evolving threat in Mali requires international partnerships, which is why the UK has been a firm supporter of the UN Security Council Resolutions on Mali as well as regional leadership from Economic Community of West African States and the African Union and EU training to help rebuild the Malian army.

 

Colonel M’Bawine Atintande, Director of Public Relations for the Ghana Armed Forces, said:

Ghana is sending an Engineer Company that’s more than 120 of all ranks. The company will play every specific role. We expect the forces to be there as long as it takes to solve the problem. Normally we stay in the six months and then rotate.

 

The UK has given us so much support. Before AFISMA we have had so much support from Britain, including a training team.

 

There is training assistance they have given us in preparing the troops for the mission so by and large the UK government has given us so much that we need in the mission.

As well as providing logistical support and C-17 aircraft to support the French-led intervention in Mali last month, the UK also offered up to 40 personnel for the EU training mission to Mali and up to 200 personnel in support of the African-led support mission.

 

Negotiations are continuing on the details of the UK’s contribution.

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4 février 2013 1 04 /02 /février /2013 15:45

http://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/image_data/file/6298/s300_7644-UNCLASS-20130127-001_121.jpg

Senior Aircraftman William Wambiru (right) stands guard with a member of the French Air Force at Bamako Airport in Mali [Picture: Wing Commander Dylan Eklund, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]

 

1 February 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

UK operations in support of the French military in Mali are continuing from Evreux Air Base near Paris.

 

Since the short notice commencement of Operation Newcombe, C-17 Globemaster aircraft operated by the RAF’s 99 Squadron have been flying 5,000-mile round-trip missions on a near daily basis, transporting armoured vehicles, freight and personnel.

 

Two days after the announcement by the Prime Minister that the UK would provide logistical support to French military operations in the West African state, 50 tons of military equipment were delivered to the capital Bamako, equivalent to a week’s worth of freight delivered to Afghanistan.

 

Wing Commander Simon Bellamy, the RAF liaison officer at the French military headquarters, said:

The deployment demonstrates the decisive contribution that air power can make to any emerging operation. The pace of our response to the formal French request for logistical support illustrates not only the professionalism of our personnel but also the increasingly strong and operationally-focused links we have generated with the French Air Force since the Libya campaign.

For Squadron Leader Spence Wild, a flight commander on 99 Squadron, the C-17 is tailor-made for the operation. He said:

The type of tasking we’re undertaking here is what the C-17 was designed and brought into service for. Being involved in a multinational, fast-paced build-up of forces over a great distance demonstrates the benefit of the C-17 and what it brings to our current inventory of air transport assets.

Detachment commander at Evreux Air Base is Squadron Leader Tom Walker who said:

We’re helping the French because they don’t have the capability that we do to lift large vehicles and heavy loads in one aircraft and transport them long distances at speed. Every single aircraft which has left here for Mali has done so with either a maximum payload or a maximum bulk against the priorities the French have given us.

Three French Army armoured personnel carriers on board a Royal Air Force C-17 aircraft bound for Mali
Three French Army armoured personnel carriers on board a Royal Air Force C-17 aircraft bound for Mali [Picture: Wing Commander Dylan Eklund, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]

As the commander, Squadron Leader Walker is responsible for a small team which includes movement personnel, signallers, aircrew, and force protection and security personnel, all of whom work from office accommodation nicknamed ‘The Bungalow’. He said:

These disparate branches have come together to deliver the output and each one brings something vital to the task. They have had to work very closely with their French counterparts at every level in order to get the job done.

And with unfamiliar vehicles and equipment to transport, another RAF Brize Norton-based unit has been deployed to assist.

 

Today, Friday 1 February, also saw Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Dalton and his French Air Force counterpart, General Denis Mercier, renew the annual agreement to advance military co-operation between their respective air forces. Air Chief Marshal Dalton said:

From demanding missions in Afghanistan to our rapid response to the Libya crisis, the RAF continues to provide the nation’s air power wherever it is needed around the world.

 

Today, we are assisting our French ally with important counter-terrorist operations in Mali with both our C-17 transport and Sentinel surveillance aircraft, demonstrating the Royal Air Force’s agility, capability and global reach.

The agreement, known as the Directive of Objectives, is a direct result of the Security and Defence Cooperation Treaty signed in November 2010 by the governments of the UK and the French Republic.

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25 janvier 2013 5 25 /01 /janvier /2013 17:45

130114-mali-operation-serval-poursuite-du-deploiement-des-f

 

22 janv. 2013 BritishForcesNews

 

British support of the French military campaign in Mali is continuing with the RAF ferrying troops and supplies to the African country.

Forces News cameras joined one of the C-17 aircraft, based at Brize Norton, for the fourth sortie of the operation codenamed Op Newcombe.

 

 


 

 

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23 janvier 2013 3 23 /01 /janvier /2013 17:10

130114-mali-operation-serval-poursuite-du-deploiement-des-f.jpg

 

23 January 2013 14:17 defenceweb (Reuters)

 

Britain has vowed a tough response against militants in North Africa, but behind its tough language lies the ugly reality of a fast-shrinking army, deep budget cuts and little U.S. interest in another costly war in a distant desert.

 

Enraged by the death of British citizens in a hostage taking crisis in Algeria, Prime Minister David Cameron has called for a global response to jihadist threats in North Africa and warned it could take decades to tame the increasingly volatile region.

 

Unlike France, whose move to send troops to nearby Mali this month is an echo of its own colonial past in Francophone Africa, Britain faces the uphill task of finding a relevant role to play in what could be a new phase in the global war against terror, Reuters reports.

 

Further dampening Cameron's hopes for coordinated action, his own government announced sweeping cuts to the army this week as recession-hit Britain struggles to plug a yawning budget gap.

 

"We've frankly run out of treasure to be doing this," a former senior military official told Reuters.

 

"The Americans are key," he said, adding that Britain realizes that unless it goes in with an enormous force it will not be decisively influential.

 

Unrest in North Africa has long been a headache for Western powers, but the region shot back to the top of global agenda after a bloody hostage siege in Algeria and France's intervention against Islamist fighters in neighboring Mali.

 

No sooner had French bombers started pounding rebels in northern Mali on January 11, than al Qaeda-linked militants struck back by storming a desert gas plant in Algeria in a hostage taking crisis in which dozens of people were killed.

 

Britain and its Western allies are concerned about the emergence of the so-called arc of instability spanning from Taliban bases in Pakistan all the way to Africa, which has allowed jihadists to regroup and entrench in places like Mali.

 

The growth of al-Qaeda's North African wing, known as Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, is at the heart of these concerns, as well as the rise of local copycat groups driven by a mixture of religious zeal, cross-border crime and separatism.

 

TREACHEROUS TERRAIN

 

All three - France, the United States and Britain - are permanent U.N. Security Council members but their vision of how to tackle North Africa, with its treacherous terrain, porous borders and erratic tribal alliances, does not always overlap.

 

Seeking to jolt his Western allies into action, Cameron described North Africa as a "magnet for jihadists" this week, vowing to boost intelligence aid to Algeria and consider giving more help to France to fight Islamists in Mali.

 

Britain is providing France with two C-17 military transport aircraft for Mali and has pledged to send dozens of soldiers to a European Union mission to train Malian government forces.

 

Cameron's office has ruled out any direct military intervention but on Tuesday, the Times newspaper reported that British forces had been put on alert for a "fully-fledged battle against al Qaeda" in northern Africa.

 

Few experts take this possibility seriously, given Britain's dwindling military clout and budget constraints.

 

"I think what's being talked up now in terms of an existential threat is warming up the British public," said the military official, who was not authorized to speak publicly.

 

"But to be honest until someone with a Algerian, or Malian or Nigerian pedigree comes and puts a bomb in London on a bus, on the tube (metro), no one's going to take any notice. The popular opinion will be: 'It's not our problem'."

 

Bringing his rhetoric back to earth, Cameron's own defense ministry announced 5,300 job cuts in the army on Tuesday, the same day the prime minister chaired a national security council meeting to discuss developments in Africa.

 

ANOTHER LONG CONFLICT?

 

France, by contrast, was quick to send troops and fighter jets to Mali to stop the advance of Islamist rebels who had seized an area the size of Spain in the north and declared Sharia law, banned all music but the Islamic call to prayer.

 

France's motives are however entirely different.

 

Still haunted by the ghosts of its own colonial experience in Africa, France has a long history of interventionism on the continent, having launched dozens of operations there since the 1960s in a policy known as Françafrique.

 

But the U.S. response has been markedly muted. Already accelerating plans to pull out troops from Afghanistan, it has shown no desire to get dragged into another conflict that could overshadow President Barack Obama's second term in office.

 

Like other Western players, Washington is unnerved by the rise of militancy in the Sahara region but its involvement there has been confined to quiet intelligence gathering and sharing, predominantly alongside the Algerian government.

 

"The Americans since 9/11 have built up quite a strong presence in the Sahel, which they don't really communicate about very much," said Francois Heisbourg, a special adviser at the Foundation for Strategic Research, a Paris-based think-tank.

 

"I am not sure how strong the Brits are in terms of their own technical intelligence means in the region."

 

Washington is also anxious to avoid any repeat of its painful experience in Afghanistan where U.S. support for anti-Soviet mujahedeen eventually gave birth to al Qaeda itself.

 

In Mali, coup leader Captain Amadou Sanogo, who last year helped topple a Mali president seen in the West as a linchpin in its fight against al Qaeda in Africa - had been himself previously trained by the U.S. military.

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18 janvier 2013 5 18 /01 /janvier /2013 13:35

Y-20

 

January 18, 2013: Strategy Page

 

Photos from China confirm rumors that the air force there has been developing an air transport similar to the American C-17. The new Chinese aircraft is called the Y-20 and appears to have a max weight of 220 tons and a max payload of 80 tons. In most other respects it appears very similar to the C-17. The Y-20 will likely include many characteristics of the 195 ton Il-76, a Russian heavy transport that can carry up to 50 tons and that the Chinese have been using for decades. The two Y-20 prototypes have been undergoing ground taxi tests, which usually happens within months, or up to a year before the first flight.

 

The C-17 entered service 17 years ago and each one has a useful life of 30,000 flight hours. The 290 ton C-17 can carry up to 100 tons (including one M-1 tank) anywhere in the world because of in-air refueling. The C-17 costs about $250 million each. Britain, with eight, is the largest foreign user of the C-17. Australia and the UAE each have six while Canada and Qatar each have four. India has ordered ten. The U.S. Air Force operates 203. China does not need that many Y-20s, but it does want to get away from depending on Russia for heavy transports. Dealing with Russia can be difficult.

 

Last year China revived, in part, a 2005 deal to buy Il-76 transports from Russia. The new arrangement only involved China buying ten refurbished Il-76s. Back in 2005, China placed a $1.5 billion order for 38 Il-76 transport planes and Il-78s (tanker versions of the Il-76). A year later China cancelled the deal when Russia tried to up the price 27 percent. China went looking elsewhere, including urging its domestic aircraft manufacturers to come up with something. That process eventually led to the Y-20, but in the meantime China needs some more jet powered military transports.

 

Similar to the older American C-141, the Il-76 was originally only manufactured in Uzbekistan. That's because one of the Russian aircraft plants moved east during the German invasion of 1941, and ended up in Central Asia, a part of the Soviet Union that became independent Uzbekistan in 1991. Over the last decade Russia has been moving Il-76 production from Uzbekistan to Russia.

 

Over 900 Il-76s were manufactured over the last thirty years, most by what is now the Chkalov Tashkent Aircraft Production Company in Uzbekistan. Nearly a hundred Il-76s were exported, so far, mainly to Cuba, Iraq, China, India, Libya, and Syria. However, until the 2005 Chinese order came along, Chkalov was surviving by manufacturing wings and other components for the An-124, An-70, and An-225 transports. In addition, it made replacement parts for the Il-76 and Il-114 aircraft.

 

Russian commercial aircraft survived during the Cold War partly because they had a captive market (the former Soviet Union, the East European nations the Soviets dominated) and were attractive to a few other nations looking for cheap, often free, and rugged aircraft. While many old Soviet transports still serve on in secondary markets, these designs are no longer competitive. Western models, while more expensive, are cheaper and easier to operate. The old Soviet era aviation firms have tried hard to compete, but that competition will eventually kill off most of the Soviet era producers, leaving only a few who managed to catch up with the rest of the world or found a specialized niche.

 

China is no longer interested in buying 38 Il-76/78s but is willing to work with Russia in developing a Chinese replacement for the Il-76. That’s the Y-20 which is using Russian engines and much more Russian aviation technology as well.

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17 janvier 2013 4 17 /01 /janvier /2013 08:45

RAF C17

 

January 16th, 2013 By UK Ministry of Defence - defencetalk.com

 

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement that the UK will provide logistical military assistance in support of French military operations in Mali, a second Royal Air Force C-17 strategic transport aircraft has arrived in France.

 

At Evreux Airbase near Paris the aircraft will be loaded with armoured vehicles and other military equipment for transport to the Malian capital Bamako. French forces are assisting the Malian Government to contain rebel and extremist groups in the North of the country.

 

Officer Commanding 99 Squadron, Wing Commander Stu Lindsell said:

 

“We started doing some contingency planning on Saturday and we had the green light to go yesterday and so the first aircraft left within 24 hours of our initial scoping.

 

“We will be providing the C-17 logistical support as part of the UK commitment to supporting the French operations in Mali. We’ll be operating from France to provide support to the region.

 

“I have been very impressed by how everyone on the squadron and the station has risen to meet the task. We often plan for contingency operations on 99 Squadron; we’re fairly used to that as part of our day-to-day operations, but everyone has been incredibly keen and enthusiastic and we couldn’t have done it any quicker.”

 

This view was echoed by Flight Lieutenant David Blakemore, Flight Commander Training on 99 Squadron:

 

“There’s a real buzz on the squadron. This is something different, somewhere different and people really want to get involved.

 

“The fact another nation is coming to the UK to ask for its outsize lift capability is testament to the C-17’s reputation forged over the past decade.”

 

The RAF’s fleet of C-17 Globemasters give the ability to move equipment and personnel swiftly around the World for both military and humanitarian operations. The huge payload and long range of the C-17 make the aircraft, operated by 99 Squadron, ideally placed to enable the UK Government to respond to worldwide challenges.

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17 janvier 2013 4 17 /01 /janvier /2013 08:45

http://www.blogs.mod.uk/.a/6a00d83505ce1d53ef017ee773e02b970d-800wi

 

16 January 2013 UK MoD

 

A French Véhicule de l'Avant Blindé or 'Armoured Vanguard Vehicle' is unloaded from an RAF C-17 at Bamako Airport, Mali, in support of Operation Newcombe. Two C-17 aircraft first flew from RAF Brize Norton to the French air base of Évreux-Fauville near Paris to assist the French military with the movement of equipment to Mali in West Africa. Click here to read more. [Picture: Senior Aircraftman Dek Traylor, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]
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15 janvier 2013 2 15 /01 /janvier /2013 16:50

http://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/image_data/file/6057/s300_DMOC-2013-002-025.jpg

 

14 January 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

2 Royal Air Force C-17 transport aircraft have arrived in France as part of the UK's logistical support to French military operations in Mali.

 

At Évreux-Fauville Air Base near Paris the aircraft will be loaded with armoured vehicles and other military equipment for transport to the Malian capital, Bamako. French forces are assisting the Malian government to contain rebel and extremist groups in the north of the country.

 

Officer Commanding 99 Squadron, Wing Commander Stu Lindsell, said:

We started doing some contingency planning on Saturday and we had the green light to go yesterday and so the first aircraft left within 24 hours of our initial scoping.

 

We will be providing the C-17 logistical support as part of the UK commitment to supporting the French operations in Mali. We’ll be operating from France to provide support to the region.

 

I have been very impressed by how everyone on the squadron and the station has risen to meet the task. We often plan for contingency operations on 99 Squadron; we’re fairly used to that as part of our day-to-day operations, but everyone has been incredibly keen and enthusiastic and we couldn’t have done it any quicker.

French military equipment in the cargo hold of a Royal Air Force C-17 transport aircraft
At Évreux-Fauville Air Base, near Paris, one of the RAF C-17 aircraft is loaded with armoured vehicles and other military equipment for transport to the Malian capital, Bamako [Picture: Senior Aircraftman Dek Traylor, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]
French military equipment in the cargo hold of a Royal Air Force C-17 transport aircraft
French military equipment in the cargo hold of a Royal Air Force C-17 transport aircraft at Évreux, France [Picture: Senior Aircraftman Dek Traylor, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]

This view was echoed by Squadron Leader David Blakemore, Flight Commander Training on 99 Squadron, who said:

There’s a real buzz on the squadron. This is something different, somewhere different and people really want to get involved.

 

The fact another nation is coming to the UK to ask for its outsize lift capability is testament to the C-17’s reputation forged over the past decade.

The RAF’s fleet of C-17 Globemasters give the ability to move equipment and personnel swiftly around the world for both military and humanitarian operations. The huge payload and long range of the C-17 make the aircraft, operated by 99 Squadron, ideally placed to enable the UK Government to respond to worldwide challenges.

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14 janvier 2013 1 14 /01 /janvier /2013 14:15

http://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/image_data/file/6041/s300_SEF12-06559-015.jpg

 

14 January 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

The UK is to provide logistical military assistance to Mali in order to help control rebel and extremist groups in the north of the country.

 

On Saturday, 12 January, the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, spoke to President François Hollande of France about how the UK can support French military assistance being provided to the Malian government to contain rebel and extremist groups in the north of the country.

 

As a result of this, the UK has offered, at French request, 2 transport aircraft to help quickly transport foreign troops and equipment to the West African country.

 

The UK Prime Minister and the Foreign Secretary, William Hague, have confirmed that no British forces will be involved in a combat role at all.

An RAF C-17 in flight
An RAF C-17 in flight (stock image) [Picture: Sergeant Jack Pritchard, Crown Copyright/MOD 2002]

Speaking over the weekend, UK Foreign Office Minister Mark Simmonds said that the UK has been concerned, alongside the international community, about the situation in northern Mali for some time. He explained that the northern part of Mali is controlled by Al-Qaeda and other terrorist organisations, and that potentially poses a direct threat to the UK and regional stability.

 

Mr Simmonds said:

We’re working with the United Nations, where there have been 2 resolutions, and the African Union and ECOWAS, which is the African regional organisation, to provide both an immediate and a long term sustainable solution to the challenge that is faced in Mali.

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21 mai 2012 1 21 /05 /mai /2012 06:56
Boeing Delivers RAF's 8th C-17 Globemaster III

 

May 20, 2012 ASDNews Source : The Boeing Company

 

Boeing delivered the United Kingdom's eighth C-17 Globemaster III to the Royal Air Force (RAF) today during a ceremony at the company's final assembly facility in Long Beach.

 

"I'm honored and delighted to deliver the Royal Air Force's newest C-17 to join the fleet at Number 99 Squadron, where our seven C-17s are in constant demand flying missions in support of Defence and other government agencies' requirements," said RAF Wing Cmdr. David Manning, Officer Commanding 99 Squadron. "It's a great feeling to know that we have the capability to deliver crucial supplies to the front lines with little notice, or to transport injured troops home with a better chance of survival because of the capability and flexibility of the C-17. This newest C-17 will be a welcome addition to the Air Force fleet."

 

The RAF C-17s are operated by 99 Squadron at RAF Brize Norton. The first RAF C-17s entered service in 2001 and have surpassed 74,000 flight hours -- 15 percent above the projected rate. The UK Ministry of Defence, citing ongoing demand, ordered additional airlifters for delivery in 2008 and 2010 and contracted for its eighth C-17 in March.

 

"RAF C-17s are ever-present when there's a need for humanitarian relief or peacekeeping around the world," said Bob Ciesla, Boeing Airlift vice president and C-17 program manager. "We're proud to support the Royal Air Force in providing for the mobility needs of their great nation, and we are grateful for the partnership with the UK Ministry of Defence and U.S. Air Force that made this delivery possible in such a short time."

 

"The RAF fleet's airlift capacity, increased by this latest delivery, is backed by a comprehensive sustainment services program," said Boeing Defence UK Managing Director Mike Kurth. "As part of the worldwide C-17 'virtual fleet,' RAF C-17s are supported through the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III Integrated Sustainment Program (GISP), a Performance-Based Logistics agreement. The support provided to the RAF under the GISP arrangement results in an excellent mission-capable rate at one of the lowest costs per flying hour."

 

Boeing has delivered 242 C-17s worldwide, including 216 to the U.S. Air Force active duty, Guard and Reserve units. A total of 26 C-17s have been delivered to Australia, Canada, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of NATO and Partnership for Peace nations. India has 10 C-17s on order for delivery in 2013 and 2014.

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29 mars 2012 4 29 /03 /mars /2012 07:20

RAF C17

 

LONG BEACH, Calif., March 28 (UPI)

 

An eighth C-17 Globemaster III will be delivered to the British air force this year under a new contract to Boeing from the country's Ministry of Defense.

 

The British C-17s are used primarily to support Operation Herrick, the transport of equipment and troops to Afghanistan but also participate in humanitarian missions around the world, such as the delivery of relief supplies following natural disasters.

 

"The tremendous teamwork of Boeing and U.S. government officials has made it possible to announce this acquisition so quickly after we determined the need for this additional C-17," said Ministry of Defense Head of Commercial for Air Support Robin Philip. "This C-17 will be a welcome addition to the (air force) fleet."

 

The British air force was Boeing's first international customer for the heavy lift aircraft, and its fleet has logged more than 74,000 flight hours – about 15 percent more than had been anticipated.

 

The last C-17 purchased was delivered in November 2010.

 

"We understand the need to move quickly to bring this contract to completion," said Liz Pace, Boeing C-17 UK program manager. "This additional order is a testament to our strong relationship with the U.K. as well as to the aircraft's advanced capability, flexibility and reliability."

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9 mars 2012 5 09 /03 /mars /2012 08:50

UK MOD

 

March 8, 2012 Official Blog of the UK Ministry of Defence - defpro.com

 

The Daily Telegraph has published a comment piece by James Blunt criticising the Royal Air Force (RAF) air bridge following his and Katherine Jenkins' aborted trip to Afghanistan. He says 'our [the United Kingdom's] deployment of manpower is inefficient and costly'.

 

Due to some technical problems with our aircraft, the visit suffered a number of delays resulting in its cancellation. However, it should be noted that our air bridge aircraft work exceptionally hard and operate in tough environments which, unfortunately, can sometimes lead to unavoidable delays.

 

The air bridge as a whole is highly reliable, serving our operational theatres on a daily basis. We are due to take delivery of a new C-17 later this year which will boost our ability to move troops and equipment between Afghanistan and the UK. In addition, our new Voyager transport aircraft is due to come into service in 2014.

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8 février 2012 3 08 /02 /février /2012 18:50
UK to buy eighth C-17 transport

The RAF's C-17s play a vital role in supporting UK operations in Afghanistan – photo UK MoD

 

Feb 08, 2012 by Craig Hoyle- Flight Global

 

London - The UK is to order another Boeing C-17 strategic transport, with the acquisition to boost the Royal Air Force's fleet of the type to eight aircraft.

 

Announced by prime minister David Cameron on 8 February, the purchase represents the potentially final addition to the UK's C-17 fleet, which plays a vital role in sustaining its "airbridge" with Afghanistan. Seven are flown by the service's 99 Sqn from its air transport super base at RAF Brize Norton, Oxfordshire.

 

Writing on his Twitter account, minister for defence equipment, support and technology Peter Luff described the decision as "really good news for Defence and for [the] RAF".

 

Further details about the acquisition will be announced by the UK Ministry of Defence later today, with Boeing declining to comment in advance of its customer's statement.

 

In May 2011, the RAF marked the completion of its first decade of operations with the C-17, an initial four of which were flown under a lease agreement with the USA. These were subsequently purchased outright, with orders later placed for two and one aircraft respectively.

 

The UK operates the second-largest fleet of C-17s, behind the US Air Force, although India recently completed the process of ordering a fleet of 10 to enter use from later this decade.

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19 juillet 2011 2 19 /07 /juillet /2011 05:45

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=40918 

image © Craig Hoyle/Flightglobal

 

18/07/11 By Craig Hoyle SOURCE:Flightglobal.com

 

The UK Royal Air Force marked the 10th anniversary of its introduction of Boeing’s C-17 strategic transport by sending one of its aircraft to the Royal International Air Tattoo for the first time in several years.

 

ZZ177, the seventh and currently last planned C-17 to enter service with the RAF’s 99 Sqn, arrived at the show early on 17 July, before being opened to the public while on static display.

 

But highlighting the C-17 fleet’s continued heavy commitment to the NATO-led operation in Afghanistan, it was held at short readiness to leave the show if required to perform medical evacuation duties in support of the UK’s deployed armed forces.

 

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=40919

image © Craig Hoyle/Flightglobal

 

The UK took delivery of its first C-17 under an initially four-aircraft lease deal with Boeing in May 2001, one year after signing a deal with the company. Now purchased outright and joined by a further three of the airlifters, these deliver a key part of the UK’s “airbridge” with the Afghan theatre of operations.

 

ZZ177 entered operational use with 99 Sqn at RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire during February, by which point the unit's other aircraft had flown more than a combined 65,000 flight hours.

 

RIAT’s organisers estimate that around 138,000 visitors attended this year’s show at RAF Fairford in Gloucestershire.

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18 mars 2011 5 18 /03 /mars /2011 18:00
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