Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 08:30
Turkey distancing from missile deal with China

 

 

March 11, 2014 by defense-update.com

 

Objections of Western allies and reservations of local subcontractors over potential consequences of association with the blacklisted CPMIEC are distancing the Chinese contractor from the coveted $3.44 Billion missile defense contract with Ankara - Hurriyet Daily News reports.
 

After months of consistent support for the deal, Turkey’s defense procurement establishment and intended industry partners are wearing down over the potential $3.44 billion deal with China Precision Machinery Import-Export Corp (CPMIEC), as the administration reassesses the broader consequences of their September 2013 decision to award the controversial contract to  the Chinese company. With CPMIEC being on the US black list, its potential Turkish subcontractors would be exposed to similar sanctions. “Aselsan is especially increasingly cautious,” Hurriyet quoted an anonymous source in the defense administration, military electronics specialist Aselsan, Turkey’s biggest defense firm, has been designated as the program’s prime local subcontractor.

Turkey has come under strong pressure from its NATO allies since it announced its decision over the T-LORAMIDS long-range air and anti-missile system. Ankara said it had chosen CPMIEC FD-2000 missile-defense system over rival offers from Franco-Italian Eurosam SAMP/T and Raytheon of the United States. Ankara said the decision was based on better price and better terms of technology transfer but the selection raised much controversy among NATO allies, refusing to allow integration of the Chinese system into the NATO air defense network and fact that the Chinese company has been sanctioned under the Iran, North Korea and Syria non proliferation act.

Turkey’s Defense Industry Executive Committee oversees major procurement decisions, including the air defense system. The committee is chaired by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, while its other members include Defense Minister İsmet Yılmaz, Chief of General Staff Gen. Necdet Özel and SSM chief Murad Bayar. Bayar said Feb. 27 that Turkey was aiming to decide on talks with CPMIEC and finalize a roadmap on the program next month. “Our talks with China are ongoing. We have extended the bidding until the end of April. We are aiming to get results in early April on this,” Bayar said.

There are indications that Turkey’s procurement agency, the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM), may have distanced itself from the Chinese option. “We think that the SSM now has a more NATO-centric view over the competition, not just military,” a Turkish security official dealing with NATO said. NATO and U.S. officials have said any Chinese-built system could not be integrated with Turkey’s joint air defense assets with NATO and the U.S. and that it may harm Turkey’s relations with the alliance.

Final decision would be made by a committee chaired by Erdoğan. However, pre-election political turbulence in Turkey may have diverted Erdoğan’s attention from the contract. “The prime minister has been pro-active in all stages of the program. But we are not sure if this is a priority matter for him at the moment.” Defense officials told Hurriyet the program may drag into further uncertainty after local polls on March 30. “A decision on a program of this size and complexities may require better political stability than we have today,” one source said.

Partager cet article
Repost0
25 mars 2014 2 25 /03 /mars /2014 08:35
Targeting Huawei: NSA Spied on Chinese Government and Networking Firm

 

March 22, 2014 by SPIEGEL

 

According to documents viewed by SPIEGEL, America'a NSA intelligence agency put considerable efforts into spying on Chinese politicians and firms. One major target was Huawei, a company that is fast becoming a major Internet player.


 

The American government conducted a major intelligence offensive against China, with targets including the Chinese government and networking company Huawei, according to documents from former NSA worker Edward Snowden that have been viewed by SPIEGEL and the New York Times. Among the American intelligence service's targets were former Chinese President Hu Jintao, the Chinese Trade Ministry, banks, as well as telecommunications companies.

But the NSA made a special effort to target Huawei. With 150,000 employees and €28 billion ($38.6 billion) in annual revenues, the company is the world's second largest network equipment supplier. At the beginning of 2009, the NSA began an extensive operation, referred to internally as "Shotgiant," against the company, which is considered a major competitor to US-based Cisco. The company produces smartphones and tablets, but also mobile phone infrastructure, WLAN routers and fiber optic cable -- the kind of technology that is decisive in the NSA's battle for data supremacy.

A special unit with the US intelligence agency succeeded in infiltrating Huwaei's network and copied a list of 1,400 customers as well as internal documents providing training to engineers on the use of Huwaei products, among other things.

 

Source Code Breached

According to a top secret NSA presentation, NSA workers not only succeeded in accessing the email archive, but also the secret source code of individual Huwaei products. Software source code is the holy grail of computer companies. Because Huawei directed all mail traffic from its employees through a central office in Shenzhen, where the NSA had infiltrated the network, the Americans were able to read a large share of the email sent by company workers beginning in January 2009, including messages from company CEO Ren Zhengfei and Chairwoman Sun Yafang.

"We currently have good access and so much data that we don't know what to do with it," states one internal document. As justification for targeting the company, an NSA document claims that "many of our targets communicate over Huawei produced products, we want to make sure that we know how to exploit these products." The agency also states concern that "Huawei's widespread infrastructure will provide the PRC (People's Republic of China) with SIGINT capabilities." SIGINT is agency jargon for signals intelligence. The documents do not state whether the agency found information indicating that to be the case.

The operation was conducted with the involvement of the White House intelligence coordinator and the FBI. One document states that the threat posed by Huawei is "unique".

The agency also stated in a document that "the intelligence community structures are not suited for handling issues that combine economic, counterintelligence, military influence and telecommunications infrastructure from one entity."

 

Fears of Chinese Influence on the Net

The agency notes that understanding how the firm operates will pay dividends in the future. In the past, the network infrastructure business has been dominated by Western firms, but the Chinese are working to make American and Western firms "less relevant". That Chinese push is beginning to open up technology standards that were long determined by US companies, and China is controlling an increasing amount of the flow of information on the net.

In a statement, Huawei spokesman Bill Plummer criticized the spying measures. "If it is true, the irony is that exactly what they are doing to us is what they have always charged that the Chinese are doing through us," he said. "If such espionage has been truly conducted, then it is known that the company is independent and has no unusual ties to any government and that knowledge should be relayed publicly to put an end to an era of mis- and disinformation."

Responding to the allegations, NSA spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said she should could not comment on specific collection activities or on the intelligence operations of specific foreign countries, "but I can tell you that our intelligence activities are focused on the national security needs of our country." She also said, "We do not give intelligence we collect to US companies to enhance their international competitiveness or increase their bottom line."

Editor's note: A longer version of this story will appear in German in the issue of SPIEGEL to be published on Monday.

Partager cet article
Repost0
24 mars 2014 1 24 /03 /mars /2014 17:35
source Les Yeux du Monde

source Les Yeux du Monde


24.03.2014 Charles CASTA - Portail de l'I.E.
 

Depuis 2012, et malgré les récentes déclarations amicales de Washington et Pékin, on observe une montée des tensions dans le Pacifique. Parallèlement, l'Asean refuse de prendre position, tiraillée en interne entre partisans américains et chinois. Dans le cadre d' un éventuel conflit, quelles seraient alors les options de l'organisation asiatique?

 

Le sommet informel de juin 2013 entre Barack Obama et son homologue chinois Xi Jinping a laissé entrevoir la possibilité d’un apaisement des tensions dans les relations sino-américaines comme en témoigne la déclaration du président chinois qui souhaite voir émerger une nouvelle ère de relations bilatérales basées sur la paix, la tolérance et la coopération. Néanmoins, les nombreux incidents qui ont émaillé la fin de l’année 2013 (instauration chinoise d’une zone aérienne d’identification en mer de Chine de l’Est et d’une zone de pêche contrôlée en mer de Chine du Sud, incident entre le navire militaire américain Cowpens et une frégate chinoise) laissent plutôt penser que l’affrontement stratégique entre Pékin et Washington dans le Pacifique est sérieux et s’inscrit dans le long terme. A côté des deux premières puissances mondiales, la puissance régionale montante, l’Asean, créé en 1967 à Bangkok, tente de résoudre pacifiquement les conflits et de prévenir l'escalade des tensions impliquant la Chine et une majorité de ses dix Etats membres. Si l’organisation a jusqu’à présent toujours réussi à empêcher la naissance d’un conflit armé, quel serait son rôle dans un affrontement sino-américain ?

 

Les raisons laissant penser à un futur conflit

 

De retour en Asie du Sud-Est depuis 2011, les Etats-Unis ont officiellement justifié ce revirement géostratégique par la volonté d’assurer la liberté de navigation en mer de Chine. Officieusement, il s’agit surtout de contrer la politique offensive chinoise et de rassurer ses alliés japonais ou coréen. Retour sur les points sensibles de la zone Pacifique :

Quelle place pour l’Asean dans le futur conflit sino-américain dans le Pacifique ?

 

Situées à 90 milles nautiques à l’ouest d’Okinawa, les îles Senkaku sont une source de tensions récurrente depuis que la  République de Chine en dispute la souveraineté au Japon. Objet de tensions croissantes depuis 2010, l’aspect économique constitue le cœur du conflit dans la mesure où les eaux bordant l’archipel recèlent d’importants gisements d’hydrocarbures (champ gazier de Chunxiao) et de ressources halieutiques (bonite notamment). La nationalisation récente de l’archipel revêt une double importance pour Tokyo : faire étalage de sa puissance face au voisin chinois et tester son allié américain.

 

Quelle place pour l’Asean dans le futur conflit sino-américain dans le Pacifique ?

Les relations entre la Chine et le Japon se sont encore tendues fin novembre 2013 suite à la décision unilatérale chinoise d’instaurer une « zone aérienne d’identification » (ZAI) dans l’espace aérien des îles Senkaku. En réaction, Tokyo a pour la seconde fois depuis 2010 modifié sa stratégie de défense, en accroissant l’intégration et la mobilité de son armée. Cette nouvelle stratégie permettrait au Japon de reprendre les îles du Sud-Ouest de l’Archipel dans l’hypothèse d’une invasion chinoise. Parallèlement, Washington a immédiatement réagit en envoyant deux bombardiers B52 survoler la zone. Si l’annonce, le 31 Janvier dernier, par le quotidien japonais « The Asahi Shimbun » de l’intention chinoise d’instaurer une nouvelle ZAI dans la partie sud de la mer de Chine s’avérait réelle, on peut se demander comment réagirait Washington qui a déjà refusé de reconnaitre la première zone.

L’instauration chinoise d’un accord préalable de pêche : Le 1er Janvier dernier, Pékin a annoncé la mise en place d’un accord préalable de pêche pour tout navire étranger souhaitant pêcher dans les eaux de mer de Chine du sud. Officiellement mise en œuvre pour préserver les ressources halieutiques de la zone et  protéger la pérennité de l’industrie de pêche, cette décision s’est accompagnée de l’envoi de patrouilleurs dans la zone ainsi qu’en Malaisie.

Pékin a aussi répliqué à la mise en place de la stratégie américaine « Air Sea Battle » par le déploiement de missiles anti-navires dans le cadre de sa stratégie « A2/AD ». Cette décision est vécue par Washington comme la volonté chinoise d’empêcher, dans le cadre d’un futur conflit, toute progression américaine dans la zone.

Enfin, la lutte pour le contrôle de la voie maritime Sulu-Sulawesi-Makassar-Lombok oppose chinois et américains à propos d’une faille sous-marine traversant l’archipel des Spratleys d’Ouest en Est. Contrôler cette faille permettrait à Washington ou Pékin de posséder une alternative au détroit de Malacca en cas de crise internationale. Cela permettrait également d’avoir un œil sur la mer de Sulu et notamment le détroit de Balabac, qui est depuis 2012 au centre des préoccupations australienne, philippine et américaine. Ce point stratégique permet de contrôler les flux des sous-marins chinois dans la zone. Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas innocent si les Etats-Unis ont inauguré il y a peu une nouvelle base à Darwin en Australie.

 

Quelles conséquences pour l’ASEAN ?

Les tensions sino-américaines, directes ou indirectes, ont des répercussions inévitables sur l’Asean. Si les Etats membres de l’organisation ont toujours refusé de choisir entre Washington et Pékin, afin de préserver ses valeurs d’unité et de neutralité, cet « Asean way » est à l’heure actuelle soumis à rude épreuve. En effet, depuis le retour des Etats-Unis dans la zone Pacifique, plusieurs pays membres de l’Asean comme le Vietnam ou la Birmanie s'en sont rapprochés pour contrer la menace chinoise. Ces stratégies ont des répercussions au sein de l’Asean qui voit son unité menacée entre les «pro-chinois » d’une part (Cambodge, Laos) et les pro-américains d’autre part (Vietnam, Philippines). Quels sont alors les scenarii envisageables pour l’organisation dans ses relations avec la Chine et les Etats-Unis ?

 - Un rapprochement avec la Chine pour approfondir la coopération économique. L’Asean reconnait elle-même que « l’Asean + 3 » (Chine, Japon et Corée Sud) est l’architecture diplomatique la plus à-même de bâtir une communauté est-asiatique. Dans ce scénario, les Etats membres se rapprocheraient du voisin chinois avec lequel ils ont déjà planifié des projets d’intégration économique et de développement notamment dans les domaines touristiques, technologiques et d’infrastructures. Choisir Pékin plutôt que Washington relèverait donc d’une stratégie économique visant à développer l’intégration économique et profiter des énormes débouchés offerts par la croissance chinoise. Etant donné que les Etats-Unis refusent de s’impliquer dans les affaires internes de l’Asean, ce scénario ne pourrait être exclu à l’avenir.

 - Un rapprochement avec les Etats-Unis pour contrer la menace militaire et l’influence grandissante de Pékin. Dans ce scenario, les Etats membres de l’Asean opteraient pour la protection militaire offerte par Washington dans le cadre des conflits territoriaux en mer de Chine. Certains pays comme les Philippines ou le Vietnam ont d’ailleurs déjà effectué de choix. Coté économique, ce rapprochement pourrait aboutir à terme à la mise en place du partenariat Trans-Pacifique. Quatre pays (Vietnam, Brunei, Malaisie et Singapour) participent actuellement aux négociations. Cela pourrait également accélérer la mise en place de l’initiative E3 « Expanded Economic Engagement » qui vise à accroitre le commerce et les investissements entre les Etats-Unis et l’Asean.

 - Rester dans ligne directrice historique du « non alignement ». La troisième option reste le statu quo et l’arbitrage entre les influences américaine et chinoise. Cette stratégie a déjà fait ses preuves par le passé mais est de plus en plus dangereuse à l’heure d’une montée des tensions dans la rivalité sino-américaine. De plus, cet arbitrage pourrait à terme menacer l’unité de l’organisation. Pour William Toe, professeur à l’université nationale australienne, la stratégie de « l’Asean way » de l’Asean doit être remise en question si l’organisation ne veut pas imploser.

 

Partager cet article
Repost0
24 mars 2014 1 24 /03 /mars /2014 17:20
Espionnage : le géant des télécoms chinois Huawei victime de la NSA ?

La NSA a accédé aux archives des courriels de Huawei, à des documents internes de communication entre des dirigeants de la compagnie, ainsi qu'au code secret de produits spécifiques de Huawei

 

23/03/2014 latribune.fr 

 

L'agence américaine de sécurité nationale s'est introduite secrètement dans le réseau de communications du géant des télécoms et de l'internet chinois Huawei à des fins d'espionnage.

 

 

L'agence américaine de sécurité nationale NSA (National Security Agency) s'est introduite secrètement dans le réseau de communications du géant des télécoms et de l'internet chinois Huawei à des fins d'espionnage, ont affirmé samedi le "New York Times" et le "Spiegel" dans leurs éditions en ligne. La NSA a accédé aux archives des courriels de Huawei, à des documents internes de communication entre des dirigeants de la compagnie, ainsi qu'au code secret de produits spécifiques de Huawei, affirment les articles des deux journaux basés sur des documents fournis par l'ancien consultant de la NSA Edward Snowden.

 Le "New York Times" précise que son enquête sur l'opération, baptisée "Shotgiant", s'appuie sur des documents de la NSA communiqués par l'ex-consultant de l'agence Edward Snowden, qui, depuis l'année dernière, diffuse des renseignements sur les activités de surveillance menées par les Américains dans le monde entier. "Nous bénéficions actuellement de bonnes capacités d'accès et possédons tellement de données que nous ne savons plus quoi en faire", ont assuré des responsables de la NSA, selon un document interne cité par l'hebdomadaire "Der Spiegel".

 

Démenti de Huawei

Huawei avait démenti mi-janvier des informations de presse selon lesquelles la sécurité de ses équipements télécoms pouvait être déjouée par la NSA. Il n'y a eu "aucun incident de réseau (de télécommunications) provoqué par des failles de la sécurité" des produits et infrastructures de Huawei, avait indiqué Cathy Meng, directrice financière du groupe, lors d'une conférence de presse à Pékin.

Elle était interrogée sur une enquête publiée fin décembre par le "Spiegel", selon laquelle la NSA pouvait infiltrer les systèmes et produits de plusieurs grands groupes technologiques, dont Huawei et les américains Cisco et Juniper Networks.

 

Démasquer les liens entre Huawei et l'armée chinoise

Huawei, fondé par un ancien ingénieur de l'armée chinoise, s'était vu interdire l'accès à des projets d'infrastructures aux Etats-Unis et en Australie pour des raisons de sécurité, sur fond de crainte que ses équipements soient utilisés pour de l'espionnage ou des attaques informatiques... au profit de Pékin. Outre les équipements télécoms, Huawei est le troisième fabricant mondial de smartphones.

L'un des objectifs de l'opération Shotgiant était de mettre au jour des liens entre Huawei et l'armée chinoise, lit-on dans un document de 2010 cité par le "New York Times". Mais, ajoute le journal, l'opération a visé également à tirer parti de la technologie de Huawei. La NSA cherchait ainsi à effectuer une surveillance via des ordinateurs et des téléphones du réseau Huawei vendu à des pays tiers.

Partager cet article
Repost0
23 mars 2014 7 23 /03 /mars /2014 12:35
East Asia’s security architecture – track two

 

Alerts - No18 - 21 March 2014 Eva Pejsova

 

Although East Asia’s security environment has long been known for its instability, the recent escalation of tensions between China and Japan has been followed with unprecedented concern. Besides the real risk of accidental clashes in the disputed waters due, inter alia, to the disruption of communication channels, the way in which both Beijing and Tokyo have chosen to deal with the crisis is an indication of an emerging shift in strategic thinking that will most likely have an impact on the evolution of the whole region.

As a result, debates on the need to rethink the security architecture in the region have become more frequent. Existing regional security-focused multilateral platforms could indeed contribute to stability in the region and in this context, various informal mechanisms – so-called ‘track-two’ diplomacy – often become invaluable channels for communication and interaction.

 

Download document

Partager cet article
Repost0
21 mars 2014 5 21 /03 /mars /2014 17:35
Afghanistan: the view from China

 

Alerts - No6 - 24 January 2014 Andrew Small

 

2014 is a defining year for China’s relationship with Afghanistan. After more than a decade on the margins of international efforts to shape the country’s future, this summer China will take the diplomatic driving seat as it hosts the Istanbul Ministerial Process, the major regional conclave between Afghanistan and its neighbours, in Tianjin in August.

In anticipation of the drawdown of Western forces, Beijing has been making it clear to both friends and rivals that, unlike the aftermath of Soviet withdrawal, it will not sit on the sidelines and watch the country slide into civil war.

 

Download document

Partager cet article
Repost0
20 mars 2014 4 20 /03 /mars /2014 08:35
US Considers Military Relationships with China

 

 

March 20th, 2014 By US Department of Defense - defencetalk.com

 

Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Ray Odierno said a military training relationship with China is possible as the U.S. strengthens its presence in the Asia-Pacific theater.

 

Odierno met with leaders of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army last week to discuss mil-to-mil opportunities and said some guidelines were outlined.

 

Speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., Odierno’s discussion ranged from regional alignment of forces to a return of tiered readiness, driven by a tight budget.

 

The general had just returned from a trip visiting with military leaders in China before going on to Japan and then Korea.

 

“We tend to focus on our differences,” Odierno said about the U.S. and China, “but we actually have a lot in common. One is obviously the security and stability of the Pacific region, because of the economic impact it has on both of our countries.”

 

Odierno said Chinese military leaders first talked with him in November about establishing a training relationship and said they are now going “out of their way” to push ahead on a dialogue between the two armies.

 

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel may travel to China in a month or so, Odierno said, and added that he hopes a training relationship can be solidified then.

 

“This is by far the biggest step we’ve taken in many, many years in trying to open up this relationship between our armies,” Odierno said.

 

After visiting China, Odierno went on to Japan where he discussed the future of the Japanese Self Defense Force and then continued to Korea.

 

The U.S. Army will continue to have a strong relationship with South Korea, he said, but described that relationship as one that is “morphing and changing” as the Republic of Korea takes on more responsibility for its overall defense.

 

Unit rotations may be the way ahead in Korea, he said, adding that a battalion and aviation unit just rotated to Korea from the United States.

 

Armies play an important role in the Pacific, Odierno said, even though the area is often thought of as a Navy theater. He said the U.S. Army is expanding its engagements in other countries across the theater.

 

“Over the last month we did a joint airborne operation in Thailand,” Odierno said. “We are developing relationships with the Philippines. We are having some initial forays into Vietnam. We are increasing our engagements with Indonesia.”

 

He said making the commander of U.S. Army Pacific a four-star position helped with establishing relationships in the theater. Gen. Vincent K. Brooks took over as U.S. Army Pacific, or USARPAC, commander July 2, and was promoted to four-star general.

 

“I think we’re going in the right direction,” Odierno said, not only about the Pacific, but about regional alignments elsewhere as well.

 

For instance, the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, was aligned with U.S. Africa Command. Small task forces from the brigade supported exercises and other engagements across the continent.

 

Almost 90 missions were conducted over the last year in Africa, Odierno said, and added such regional alignment of forces will continue to take place in other theaters as well.

 

“We’re going to align our forces to the combatant commanders, based on their requirements, to help them to shape and set the theaters that they are responsible for,” Odierno said.

 

Building partner capacity is not the chief of staff’s only concern, though. He said what keeps him up at night is the thought of a contingency call coming in the future that the Army might not be quite ready for and that would cost the nation in terms of lives.

 

In order to ensure units are ready for the full spectrum of decisive combat operations, Odierno said units will rotate through the Army’s combat training centers, which will be used to their “utmost potential.”

 

Emphasis will be placed on rotations to the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, La., or the Combat Maneuver Training Center in Germany. Odierno said these types of rotations are needed after 10 years of counter-insurgency and stability operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

The CTCs will prepare units to deal simultaneously with high-end combat, criminal threats, insurgencies, and other complex scenarios, Odierno said.

 

“We have to be prepared to do all of those at once,” he said. “Our future leaders will need to operate in this complex environment.”

 

Of course, investing in the CTCs will reduce the money available for home-station training, he said. Many units will need to conduct virtual constructive training at home station to make up the difference, he said.

 

With budget cuts this year and possibly next, some hard decisions may need to be made.

 

“We’re going to have to go to a tiered readiness model that causes us to ensure that we have some level of readiness across some capability,” Odierno said.

 

Tiered readiness was the system the Army had before 2004 when it adopted the Army Force Generation system, known as ARFORGEN. Under tiered readiness, units that were high priority — or slated to deploy before others — were fully resourced. Those at the lower end of the tier did not always have the equipment and resources needed to immediately deploy.

 

There are some proposals to eventually shrink the active Army to a force of 420,000.

 

“We would be challenged to conduct a prolonged joint multi-phased campaign of any duration with that size of force,” Odierno said.

 

He said a rock bottom force of at least 450,000 active-duty Soldiers, 335,000 National Guard and 195,000 Army Reserve is needed to meet the National Strategic Guidance and “that’s at high risk,” he added.

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mars 2014 3 19 /03 /mars /2014 08:55
Reims Aviation Industries dépose une offre de cession au chinois Raydelon General Aviation Company

 

17/03/2014 entreprise.lexpress.fr

 

REIMS, 17 mars 2014 - Le comité de direction de Reims Aviation Industries, filiale du groupe GECI International, a déposé lundi une offre de cession au groupe chinois Raydelon General Aviation Company (RGAC), un des quatre repreneurs possibles de l'avionneur champenois, a annoncé la société dans un communiqué.

 

Selon Reims Aviation, le rachat de l'entreprise par le fonds d'investissement chinois permettrait de sauvegarder 47 salariés parmi les 61 employés actuels et doterait la société d'un capital de 3 millions d'euros et d'une ligne de crédit de 5,5 millions d'euros.

 

"La société restera immatriculée au registre du commerce de Reims et sera dotée d'un management français qui investit lui même au capital de la nouvelle structure", a précisé la direction de l'avionneur dans son communiqué.

 

Vendredi, le tribunal de commerce de Reims donnera sa décision pour la reprise de Reims Aviation qui accuse plus de 16,8 millions de déficit cumulé sur les trois derniers exercices. L'entreprise avait été placée en redressement judiciaire en septembre après une assignation par le parquet de Reims qui l'estimait incapable d'honorer ses dettes suite à la saisine du comité d'entreprise.

 

Outre Raydelon General Aviation Company qui propose le meilleur plan social, le groupe chinois Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC), l'entrepreneur français Christophe Février (le repreneur de l'usine Plysorol dans la Marne) et ASI Innovation, une start-up de Reims composée d'anciens de Reims Aviation sont candidats à la reprise du constructeur d'avions rémois.

 

Reims Aviation Industries, qui est entré dans le giron du groupe GECI International en 2008, a produit plus de 7.000 avions depuis sa création en 1933.

 

Basée sur l'aérodrome de Reims-Prunay, au sud-est de la cité des sacres, la société fabrique actuellement un seul modèle d'avion, le F406, un bi-turbopropulseur léger spécialisé dans la surveillance terrestre et maritime.

 

 

Reims Aviation Industries dépose une offre de cession au chinois Raydelon General Aviation Company

En février 2013, une autre filiale du groupe GECI, Sky Aircraft, basée à Chambley (Meurthe-et-Moselle), qui portait le projet Skylander (un bimoteur à hélices robuste et rustique) avec 120 salariés, avait été placée en liquidation judiciaire, faute de repreneur par le tribunal de commerce de Briey.

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mars 2014 3 19 /03 /mars /2014 08:40
Numéro deux mondial de l’armement, la Russie a augmenté ses parts de marché

 

17/03 Par Alain Ruello

 

L’ex-Union soviétique reste le deuxième exportateur mondial d’armements, même si la Chine a gagné en autonomie.

 

Malgré les coups terribles que la chute de l’Union soviétique a portés à son industrie, la Russie exporte toujours autant d’armements : selon le Sipri, le pays s’est maintenu à la deuxième place mondiale depuis 2004, bien qu’il peine à contrer les Occidentaux sur les grandes campagnes à l’export. « Ce n’était pas gagné il y a dix ans », commente Louis-Marie Clouet, responsable de recherche.

Mieux, Moscou s’est payé le luxe d’augmenter sa part de marché, passée de 24 % à 27 % entre les périodes 2004-2008 et 2009-2013. Au point, selon le Sipri, de talonner les Etats-Unis, ce qui en surprendra plus d’un.

Cette performance, la Russie la doit principalement à son aéronautique militaire, et au Soukhoï 30 en particulier. L’avion de combat s’est vendu à quelques grands pays, comme l’Inde ou la Chine, mais aussi à certains, qui n’auraient pas les moyens d'acheter occidental, comme l’Ouganda.

Les autres armements à succès portent sur les hélicoptères de combat, les véhicules terrestres ou encore la défense anti-aérienne. Seul bémol : le naval « made in Russia » est à la peine, comme en témoignent les retards de la livraison d’un porte-avions à New Delhi. « Cela s’explique aussi par le fait que Moscou n’a rien commandé à ses chantiers navals depuis vingt ans », selon Louis-marie Clouet. Les exportations militaires russes ont profité de la réorganisation industrielle drastique initiée par Vladimir Poutine et qui a mis fin aux situations de concurrence sauvage russo-russes. Moscou a aussi réussi à compenser la forte décrue des ventes à la Chine.

Jusqu’en 2005, et parce que ses industriels avaient un gros besoin d’argent, la Russie a beaucoup vendu à Pékin, des avions de combat notamment. Après avoir désossé tous ces matériels, les ingénieurs chinois peuvent désormais se passer de leur voisin, sauf pour certains équipements qu’ils ne maîtrisent pas (encore), comme les moteurs. Du coup, l’Inde fait plus que jamais figure de partenaire militaire clef pour le Kremlin.

Partager cet article
Repost0
18 mars 2014 2 18 /03 /mars /2014 13:35
Les ventes d'armement soutenues par les tensions en Asie

 

18-03-2014 par RFI

 

Les importations mondiales d'armement sont en hausse de 14% sur la période 2009-2013. L'Institut international de recherche sur la paix de Stockholm (Sipri) a publié ses chiffres ce lundi. Resultats : les pays du Golfe sont toujours de gros consommateurs d'armement (+23% entre 2004 et 2013) , mais c'est en Asie que l'on constate les hausses les plus significatives. Une course aux armement qui pourrait attiser les tensions régionales.
 

Des frégates pour l'Indonésie, des sous-marins pour la Malaisie, des avions de combat pour Singapour. Depuis le début des années 2000, l'Asie du Sud a considérablement augmenté ses commandes d'armement.

« Sur la dernière décennie, +62% d'achats ont été enregistrés sur la zone Asie du Sud-Est, explique Bruno Hallendof, chercheur au Groupe de recherche et d'information sur la paix et la sécurité (Grip) de Bruxelles. Des antagonismes historiques, entre le Cambodge et la Thaïlande, entre la Thaïlande et la Birmanie, entre Singapour et la Malaisie qui continuent d'avoir quelques petits accros, notamment en ce qui concerne l'approvisionnement en eau de Singapour... Tout cela ajoute un élément de volatilité dans une situation stratégique déjà tendue. »

Une hausse des dépenses nourrie par des tensions régionales mais aussi par le développement des transferts d'armement sud-sud, comme entre la Corée du Sud et l'Indonésie autour d'un contrat de sous-marins et d'avions de combats fabriqué par Séoul.

« Nous assistons également à une modernisation des arsenaux des pays de la région, notamment en Inde qui tente de moderniser fortement ses capacités industrielles d'armement, remarque Lucie Béraud Sudreau, chercheuse associée au Sipri. Environ 40% des exportations russes se font vers l'Inde avec notamment la livraison d'un porte-avions qui était attendu depuis un certain nombre d'années. »

 

Le géant chinois

Côté exportation, c'est la grand voisin du nord, la Chine, qui titre son épingle du jeu. De plus en plus présente sur les marchés internationaux, elle devient le quatrième exportateur mondial selon le Sipri et est parvenue à bien s'implanter en Afrique.

« Ce qui est intéressant avec l'Afrique, c'est qu'il y a un positionnement qui consiste aussi à essayer de vendre des armes contre une rétribution en termes d'accès à des ressources énergétiques », explique Emmanuel Puig, chercheur à Asia Center et enseignant à Science Po Paris. Selon le SIPRI la Chine détient aujourd'hui 6% du marché mondial de l'armement... devant la France et le Royaume-Uni. En 2014, Pékin consacrera prés de 96 milliards d'euros à sa défense.

« Le développement des technologies militaires chinoises leur a également permis de s'implanter sur des marchés où ils n'étaient pas présents, remarque Lucie Béraud Sudreau. L'Algérie est un exemple récent. Pékin se retrouve ainsi parfois en compétition directe avec des industriels américains, comme en Turquie, où les pays de l'Otan font fortement pression sur leur partenaire. »

Partager cet article
Repost0
18 mars 2014 2 18 /03 /mars /2014 12:35
Les ventes d'armement soutenues par les tensions en Asie

 

18-03-2014 par RFI

 

Les importations mondiales d'armement sont en hausse de 14% sur la période 2009-2013. L'Institut international de recherche sur la paix de Stockholm (Sipri) a publié ses chiffres ce lundi. Resultats : les pays du Golfe sont toujours de gros consommateurs d'armement (+23% entre 2004 et 2013) , mais c'est en Asie que l'on constate les hausses les plus significatives. Une course aux armement qui pourrait attiser les tensions régionales.
 

Des frégates pour l'Indonésie, des sous-marins pour la Malaisie, des avions de combat pour Singapour. Depuis le début des années 2000, l'Asie du Sud a considérablement augmenté ses commandes d'armement.

« Sur la dernière décennie, +62% d'achats ont été enregistrés sur la zone Asie du Sud-Est, explique Bruno Hallendof, chercheur au Groupe de recherche et d'information sur la paix et la sécurité (Grip) de Bruxelles. Des antagonismes historiques, entre le Cambodge et la Thaïlande, entre la Thaïlande et la Birmanie, entre Singapour et la Malaisie qui continuent d'avoir quelques petits accros, notamment en ce qui concerne l'approvisionnement en eau de Singapour... Tout cela ajoute un élément de volatilité dans une situation stratégique déjà tendue. »

Une hausse des dépenses nourrie par des tensions régionales mais aussi par le développement des transferts d'armement sud-sud, comme entre la Corée du Sud et l'Indonésie autour d'un contrat de sous-marins et d'avions de combats fabriqué par Séoul.

« Nous assistons également à une modernisation des arsenaux des pays de la région, notamment en Inde qui tente de moderniser fortement ses capacités industrielles d'armement, remarque Lucie Béraud Sudreau, chercheuse associée au Sipri. Environ 40% des exportations russes se font vers l'Inde avec notamment la livraison d'un porte-avions qui était attendu depuis un certain nombre d'années. »

 

Le géant chinois

Côté exportation, c'est la grand voisin du nord, la Chine, qui titre son épingle du jeu. De plus en plus présente sur les marchés internationaux, elle devient le quatrième exportateur mondial selon le Sipri et est parvenue à bien s'implanter en Afrique.

« Ce qui est intéressant avec l'Afrique, c'est qu'il y a un positionnement qui consiste aussi à essayer de vendre des armes contre une rétribution en termes d'accès à des ressources énergétiques », explique Emmanuel Puig, chercheur à Asia Center et enseignant à Science Po Paris. Selon le SIPRI la Chine détient aujourd'hui 6% du marché mondial de l'armement... devant la France et le Royaume-Uni. En 2014, Pékin consacrera prés de 96 milliards d'euros à sa défense.

« Le développement des technologies militaires chinoises leur a également permis de s'implanter sur des marchés où ils n'étaient pas présents, remarque Lucie Béraud Sudreau. L'Algérie est un exemple récent. Pékin se retrouve ainsi parfois en compétition directe avec des industriels américains, comme en Turquie, où les pays de l'Otan font fortement pression sur leur partenaire. »

Partager cet article
Repost0
17 mars 2014 1 17 /03 /mars /2014 07:35
Image Credit Aleksey Toritsyn

Image Credit Aleksey Toritsyn

 

March 14, 2014 By Andrew Gawthorpe - thediplomat.com

 

Could China’s East Asian neighbors be tempted to seek nuclear weapons? That would be a mistake.

 

Recent events in Eastern Europe raise the issue not only of Russia’s future actions but also the lessons that will be drawn regarding other revisionist states. In East Asia, a China that is nurturing territorial ambitions of its own and has recently become less shy about asserting them will watch to see how the West reacts to Vladimir Putin’s expansionism. So will China’s East Asian neighbors, who fear they may become the next Ukraine.

One of the most potentially disturbing effects of the situation in Ukraine is the possibility it may drive nuclear proliferation. The present crisis in that country could well have been a nuclear nightmare. When the USSR was unraveling in the early 1990s, a sizeable portion of its strategic forces, along with tactical nuclear weapons, were deployed in Ukraine. Had the new Ukrainian government in Kiev taken control of these weapons upon becoming independent, it would have been the third-largest nuclear power in the world. behind only the U.S. and the Russia.

Concerned about nuclear proliferation throughout Europe if new nuclear powers were created by the Soviet Union’s demise, the U.S. pressured Ukraine to denuclearize and to return its nuclear forces to Russia. Basking in a post-independence glow and seeking U.S. support on other issues, Kiev went along. This was the origin of the so-called Budapest Memorandum of 1994, in which Ukraine promised to give up its nuclear weapons in return for Russia, Britain and the U.S. guaranteeing its sovereignty and territorial integrity. With the wholesale invasion of Crimea by Russian forces in recent days, Kiev can be forgiven for asking if the agreement is any longer worth the paper it’s written on.

Since Russia’s occupation of Crimea, a former Ukrainian foreign minister has called for his country to restock its nuclear arsenal and some Western analysts have questioned whether Putin would have acted so boldly if Ukraine still had its nuclear deterrent. The question can be expected to occur to leaders of other countries who are concerned about the territorial ambitions of their neighbors or the sincerity of Western security assurances.

The issue is of particular salience in East Asia, where China has recently been flexing its muscles in a range of territorial disputes. Regional powers such as Japan and Taiwan must be watching America’s unwillingness to forcefully confront a nuclear-armed Russia and wondering how much backbone the exhausted and drained superpower would have if China made similar moves. This is especially the case since the Obama administration’s so-called “pivot” to the Asia-Pacific seems to be much more an excuse for disengaging from the Middle East than it is a real exercise in strengthening the American alliance system in the Asia-Pacific.

Any such moves towards proliferation would be unwise. Acquiring nuclear weapons may appear to provide an effective way for countries worried about their neighbors’ territorial ambitions to deter them, but the truth is not so simple. While nuclear weapons provide an effective deterrent against an all-out attack, they are not necessarily effective in deterring lower-level conflict. Just as it is implausible to imagine that Ukraine would have responded to the appearance of balaclaved soldiers in Crimea with a first strike, so it is equally implausible to imagine any country responding to the Chinese declaration of an Air Defense Identification Zone in the same manner.

Revisionist powers are adept at nibbling away at international norms and agreements slowly and avoiding big, sweeping gestures. Countries responding to such a nibble with nuclear brinksmanship risk making their adversaries look reasonable by comparison, giving nuclear weapons questionable utility in territorial disputes. And if their use is indeed threatened and taken seriously, the result can be a dangerous cycle of escalation.

U.S. security guarantees are also much more credible and likely to be honored in the event of a conventional war than if there is a risk of the conflict going nuclear. Defending an ally who might unilaterally take the war nuclear and hence make the U.S. homeland a target for retaliatory strikes from Beijing would be risky for a U.S. president indeed. Countries in the Asia-Pacific worried about their U.S. security guarantees ought to be giving Washington more reasons to trust them and stick by them, not fewer.

A more sensible course, for both Ukraine and countries worried about China, would be to bolster their conventional military capabilities. Russia and China may be large countries, but their militaries have not been seriously tested for a long time. The prospect of a grueling, expensive and unpopular war would serve to deter both Moscow and Beijing more than the unlikely chance of a nuclear exchange. U.S. guarantees to its allies also remain more credible in such scenarios. And although events in Ukraine may have shown it is a dangerous world even for those with such assurances, further nuclear proliferation would only increase the danger further.

Andrew Gawthorpe is a teaching fellow at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom. The views in this article are his own.

Partager cet article
Repost0
15 mars 2014 6 15 /03 /mars /2014 22:35
Airbus strengthens R&T cooperation with China

 

 

Mar 14, 2014 ASDNews Source : Airbus, an EADS N.V. company

 

    Airbus and NPU of China to identify new applications for 3D printing in commercial aviation

 

Airbus and China’s North Western Polytechnical University (NPU) have signed a cooperation agreement on exploring ways to further apply 3D printing technology in the commercial aviation sector.Under this new agreement, NPU will manufacture test specimens of titanium alloy parts for Airbus using its Laser Solid Forming technology. The specimens will be manufactured according to Airbus specifications and will be measured and assessed by Airbus.

 

“We are pleased to have been selected by Airbus, the world’s leading aircraft manufacturer, as a partner to carry out the pilot project to explore ways of applying 3D printing technology in commercial aviation,” says NPU President Weng Zhiqian. “This project is a test for our 3D research capability and we are confident we will deliver satisfactory results on quality and on time that will establish a solid foundation for further cooperation in this field.”

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
15 mars 2014 6 15 /03 /mars /2014 17:35
Lawmakers press US to fund Taiwan fighter jets

 

 

Mar 14, 2014 ASDNews (AFP)

 

US lawmakers pressed Friday for a robust defense of Taiwan, voicing alarm over Pentagon plans to defund upgrades of the island's fighter jets as part of budget cuts.

 

Crossing party lines, members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee called for the United States to stand firm on protecting Taiwan and to ignore concerns by a rising China, which considers the self-governing democracy to be a province awaiting reunification.

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2014 5 14 /03 /mars /2014 13:35
Ukraine: the view from China

 

Alerts - No17 - 14 March 2014 Camille Brugier, Nicu Popescu

With every new major international crisis, it does not take long for diplomats and observers to start wondering ‘what does China think?’. This is also true for the Crimean crisis. A few days into the crisis, the Russian foreign ministry announced that the Chinese and Russians shared ‘broadly coinciding points of view’ on the situation.

Looking to China for reassurance is driven by many factors. The rise of China as a global power is just one. China is often seen as a sort of ‘swing’ power, capable of tipping the political balance between entrenched political warriors whose preferences are already well known. In this sense, China’s reaction is not always predictable. After the 2008 Russia-Georgian war the Chinese maintained a stance of public politeness towards Russia but, in private, were clearly against the recognition of South Ossetia and Abkhazia – thereby helping Central Asian countries resist alleged Russian pressures to recognise the independence of those entities.

Hence the rush by Russia to claim Chinese support for its actions in Ukraine – in a bid to claim greater legitimacy for its military invasion of a post-Soviet state. However, the claim that China is on Russia’s side is spurious.

Download document

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2014 5 14 /03 /mars /2014 07:35
China to spend more on Navy, Air Force upgrade

 

Mar 13, 2014 brahmand.com

 

BEIJING (PTI): In a major strategic shift, China has for the first time decided to spend more from its USD 132 billion defence budget to upgrade navy and air force amid deepening conflict with Japan, South China Sea dispute and US military push into Asia-Pacific.

 

The shift in allocation of funds, changing the old pattern of their equal distribution among the three forces in the past was part of a blueprint drawn by China's new leadership headed by President Xi Jinping at a key meeting recently where big structural reforms for the country's military were finalised, official media here reported.

 

Significantly, Xi - in his meeting with defence delegates attending the annual session of the Parliament on Tuesday asked the 2.3 million-strong world's largest standing military to hasten modernisation, focussing on combat capability.

 

He also sent out a stern message to the countries with which China has territorial disputes.

 

"We expect peace, but we shall never give up efforts to maintain our legitimate rights, nor shall we compromise our core interests, no matter when or in what circumstances," he said.

 

He also hinted at permitting private sector in military hardware production.

 

Market can play bigger role in military modernisation to jointly create a highly effective development pattern that features army-civilian integration, he said.

 

His remarks followed a CCTV report stating that China opted to spend more money on naval upgrade in view of raising maritime disputes and the growing interests of Chinese military interests overseas, shifting the balance towards improving the capability of the navy and air force.

 

Under this, more money will be allocated to navy and its high-tech capability, the report said.

 

China last week allocated a whopping USD 132 billion for defence, a hike of 12.2 per cent in one of the highest in its two decade-long double-digit raise in military spending.

 

In the last few years, China commissioned its first aircraft carrier, with plans to build three more besides acquiring long-range capability to launch missile attack on rival aircraft carriers. Strategic analysts say this would largely limit the mobility of the US aircraft carriers, most of which were expected to be shifted to Asia-Pacific in the next few years under the Obama Administration's pivot to Asia.

 

The rapid development of Chinese Navy raised concerns in India as it becomes a major challenge to Indian Navy's own plan to emerge as strong blue-water navy with wide range of capabilities.

 

The huge increase in China's defence spending came in the first budget after Xi took over power last year emerging as the most powerful leader, heading the ruling Communist Party, the military and the presidency, unlike his predecessor, Hu Jintao who started his ten-year tenure only with the party and the presidency.

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 mars 2014 5 14 /03 /mars /2014 07:35
Japan draws up overhaul of arms-export ban

 

March 14th, 2014 defencetalk.com (AFP)

 

Japan’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has drawn up plans to overhaul the pacifist country’s self-imposed ban on arms exports, an official said Thursday, in a move that could anger China.

 

The government of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has delivered the blueprint to lawmakers in his party and coalition partner New Komeito, according to an LDP official, with the premier looking for a green light from cabinet by the end of the month.

 

The relaxed rules could allow Tokyo to supply weaponry to nations that sit along important sea lanes to help them fight piracy and also help resource-poor Japan, which depends on mineral imports.

 

Japanese arms could potentially be shipped to Indonesia as well as nations around the South China Sea — through which fossil fuels pass — such as the Philippines, for example, which has a territorial dispute with Beijing.

 

The move would boost Japan’s defence industry amid simmering regional tensions including a territorial row with China, and fears over an unpredictable North Korea.

 

Japan already supplies equipment to the Philippines’ coast guard, an organization that is increasingly on the front line in the nation’s territorial rows with Beijing.

 

Any move to bolster that support with more outright weapon supplies could irk China, which regularly accuses Abe of trying to re-militarize his country.

 

China and Japan are at loggerheads over the ownership of a string of islands in the East China Sea, while Beijing is also in dispute with several nations over territory in the South China Sea, which it claims almost entirely.

 

Under its 1967 ban, Japan does not sell arms to communist nations, countries where the United Nations bans weapons sales, and nations that might become involved in armed conflicts.

 

The rule has long enjoyed widespread public support as a symbol of Japan’s post-war pacifism.

 

But it has been widely seen as impractical among experts, because it stops Japan from joining international projects to jointly develop sophisticated military equipment, such as jets and missiles.

 

In 2011 Tokyo eased the ban on arms exports, paving the way for Japanese firms to take part in multinational weapons projects.

 

Japan works with its only official ally the United States on weapon projects.

 

It also works with Britain, but it does not fully participate in multi-nation programs aimed at sharing development cost and know-how, because of the current ban.

 

The new rules may open the door to Japan’s broader participation in such projects.

 

But they would still “ban exports to countries involved in international conflicts,” and exports that would undermine international peace and security, Abe told parliament this week.

 

Japanese experts are divided over an overhaul, with some saying it is necessary for cutting defence costs, while others expressing concerns over tainting Japan’s peaceful image by expanding markets for the nation’s defence industry.

Partager cet article
Repost0
13 mars 2014 4 13 /03 /mars /2014 08:35
US Hits 'Provocative' China Move On Philippine Ships

 

Mar. 12, 2014 – Defense News (AFP)

 

WASHINGTON — The United States on Wednesday accused China of raising tensions by blocking two Philippines vessels as it urged freedom of navigation in the tense South China Sea.

 

The United States, a treaty-bound ally of Manila, said it was “troubled” by Sunday’s incident in which China prevented movement of two ships contracted by the Philippine navy to deliver supplies and troops to the disputed Second Thomas Shoal.

 

“This is a provocative move that raises tensions. Pending resolution of competing claims in the South China Sea, there should be no interference with the efforts of claimants to maintain the status quo,” State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

 

The Philippines on Tuesday summoned China’s charge d’affaires, accusing Beijing of a “clear and urgent threat” to Manila’s interests. Beijing countered that the ships “infringed China’s territorial sovereignty” and violated a 2002 declaration of conduct in the South China Sea.

 

The United States rejected China’s stance, saying that countries had the right to “regular resupply and rotation of personnel” to locations before the 2002 declaration.

 

The Second Thomas Shoal, which sits around 200 kilometers (125 miles) from the western Philippine island of Palawan, is claimed by the Philippines, China and Taiwan. Beijing calls it Ren’ai Reef.

 

Malaysia, Brunei and Vietnam claim other parts of the Spratly Islands, which lie near vital sea lanes and rich fishing grounds and are also believe to sit on vast mineral resources.

 

The United States, while saying it takes no position on the sovereignty of disputed territories, has been increasingly robust in its criticism of China. Last month, the United States challenged the legal basis for China’s claims over a vast area across the South China Sea.

 

The United States has been seeking to prevent China from taking more drastic action in the South China Sea. In November, China declared an Air Defense Identification Zone — requiring planes to report to Beijing — over a vast area in the East China Sea where it has a separate but intense feud over Japanese-administered islands.

 

Japan and the Philippines have accused China of making growing incursions to challenge their control over territories. US President Barack Obama will visit both Japan and the Philippines next month

Partager cet article
Repost0
12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 12:35
Vietnam-Chine : les garde-frontières renforcent leur coopération

 

11/03/2014 vietnamplus.vn

 

Les ministères vietnamien et chinois de la Défense ont organisé mardi un colloque amical dans la ville de Mong Cai, province de Quang Ninh (Nord), dans le cadre du programme d'échanges amicaux dans la défense des frontières entre les deux pays.

 

Le colloque a eu lieu en présence du ministre vietnamien de la Défense, le général d'armée Phung Quang Thanh, du vice-ministre vietnamien de la Défense, le général de corps d'armée Nguyen Chi Vinh, et du chef d'Etat-major général adjoint de l'Armée populaire de libération (APL) de Chine, le général de division Qi Jianguo.

 

Le vice-ministre Nguyen Chi Vinh a souligné les bons résultats de la coopération vietnamo-chinoise dans la Défense, la considérant comme un pilier important de la préservation et du renforcement de l'amitié entre les deux Partis, les deux États et les deux peuples. Selon lui, ce programme d'échanges amicaux dans la défense des frontières, organisé à Quang Ninh (Vietnam) et au Guangxi (Chine), a pour objet de promouvoir davantage les relations bilatérales.

 

Le général de division Qi Jianguo a apprécié ce programme qui contribue à l'intensification des relations entre les deux armées et, plus généralement, entre les deux pays.

 

Les participants à ce colloque ont été unanimes pour appliquer effectivement l'accord de coopération entre les ministères de la Défense des deux pays, poursuivre les échanges et rencontres de haut rang entre les deux armées, ouvrir des lignes téléphoniques rouges pour traiter rapidement des affaires survenant aux frontières communes...

 

Lundi, le programme d'échanges amicaux dans la défense des frontières Vietnam-Chine a commencé avec de nombreuses activités dans la ville de Dongxing, province chinoise du Guangxi.

 

Un colloque a été également organisé, lors duquel le général de division Qi Jianguo et le général de corps d'armée Nguyen Chi Vinh ont discuté du renforcement des échanges entre les garde-frontières des deux pays.

 

Durant son séjour en Chine, la délégation vietnamienne a rendu visite au régiment 1 des garde-frontières de l'Armée populaire de libération de Chine

Partager cet article
Repost0
12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 12:35
Le ministre vietnamien de la Défense reçoit des officiels militaires chinois

Le ministre de la Défense, le général d'armée Phung Quang Thanh (droite) et le général de division Qi Jianguo, chef d'Etat-major général adjoint de l'Armée populaire de libération (APL) de Chine (gauche). (Source: VNA)

 

12/03/2014 vietnamplus.vn

 

Le Vietnam est déterminé à développer des relations d'amitié de bon voisinage, de coopération globale et durable avec la Chine.

 

C'est ce qu'a affirmé le ministre de la Défense, le général d'armée Phung Quang Thanh, lors d'une rencontre mardi dans la ville de Mong Cai, province de Quang Ninh (Nord-Ouest), avec le général de division Qi Jianguo, chef d'Etat-major général adjoint de l'Armée populaire de libération (APL) de Chine , conduisant la délégation chinoise participant dans cette localité au programme d'échanges amicaux dans la défense des frontières Vietnam-Chine.

 

Le ministre Phung Quang Thanh a suggéré que les deux côtés devraient multiplier les échanges de visite d'officiers de haut rang et de jeunes officiers, contribuant à resserrer davantage l'amitié entre les deux armées, et plus généralement entre les deux pays.

 

Il a adressé sa sympathie aux familles des passagers chinois à bord du Boeing 777-200 de la Malaysia Airlines, soulignant que le Vietnam et, plus particulièrement les forces armées vietnamiennes, s'efforcent de retrouver l'avion disparu.

 

Le général de division Qi Jianguo a remercié le Vietnam pour sa participation active aux recherches du Boeing 777-200 de la Malaysia Airlines et exprimé l'espoir que les deux armées continueront d'intensifier leurs échanges de délégation à tous niveaux, la formation de personnel et la coopération dans les tâches frontalières et maritimes.

 

Le même jour, le général de divison Qi Jianguo et sa délégation ont visité le poste de garde-frontières de Tra Co

Partager cet article
Repost0
12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 12:30
Air Weapons: Iran Hides Behind China

 

 

March 12, 2014: Strategy Page

 

Iran recently announced that it has equipped some of its helicopters with the Nasr 1 and Qader anti-ship missiles. Iran described both as Iranian made cruise missiles. In reality Nasr 1 is the Chinese C-704 anti-ship missile that is built under license in Iran. Qader is a variant on the Chinese C802A that Iran produces as the license built Noor.

 

The C-802A entered service in 1989 and is a 6.8m (21 foot) long, 360mm diameter, 682kg (1,500 pound) missile, with a 165kg (360 pound) warhead. Qader is the Noor with a smaller warhead that extends the range to 200 kilometers. It is common for Iran to claim, or at least imply, that license-built weapons are actually developed and built in Iran.

 

The C-704 entered service in 2006. This missile appears to be a half sized version of the U.S. Harpoon, but it is actually based on a Chinese copy of the 300 kg Maverick missile (the C-701), but made larger. China helped Iran set up a plant to assemble the C-704s in Iran, under license as the Nasr 1. The C-704 is a 400 kg (880 pound) missile with a 130 kg (286 pound) warhead and a range of 35 kilometers. It has a radar guidance system to guide it to the target, assuming it has been fired to the general area where the target is. This is a cruise missile, moving at 800 kilometers an hour, at an altitude of 15-20 meters (46-61 feet).

 

Back in March 2011 Israel intercepted a cargo ship off their coast on March 15th, and found six Chinese C-704 anti-ship missiles. The seized missiles were apparently Iranian built C-704s. The ship had been hired by Iran to take a cargo of weapons to Egypt where the weapons would be smuggled into Gaza for Iranian ally Hamas to use against Israel.

C802A missile photo MilborneOne

C802A missile photo MilborneOne

Partager cet article
Repost0
11 mars 2014 2 11 /03 /mars /2014 18:45
Algeria evaluating Chinese CH-4 UAV

A Chinese CH-4 unmanned aerial vehicle

 

11 March 2014 bhttp://www.defenceweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=33927:algeria-evaluating-chinese-ch-4-uav&catid=35:Aerospace&Itemid=107y defenceWeb

 

Algerian is evaluating the Chinese CH-4 unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and is reportedly very interested in acquiring the type, which can be armed with guided weapons.

 

The CH-4, developed by the China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics (CAAA), has been undergoing testing with the Algerian military for some months, according to Air Forces Daily. One is reported to have crashed during testing at the Algerian Air Force’s base at Tindouf several months ago while a second one crashed on Sunday at the Ain Oussera Air Base. The UAV came down 100 metres short of the runway whilst preparing to land.

 

In spite of the crashes, Algeria is apparently still very interested in acquiring the CH-4 (Cai Hong 4 or Rainbow 4), which appears to have been inspired by the General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper. The UAV, with a takeoff weight of 1.3 tons and a payload of 350 kg, has a wingspan of 18 metres and a length of 8.5 metres. Top speed is 235 km/h and operational altitude is 3000-3500 metres, according to officially released data, while combat radius is 2000 km and endurance is 36 hours.

 

CAAA technical staff claim the CH-4 has four hard points capable of carrying two AR-1 laser-guided missiles and two FT-5 small guided bombs.

 

The CH-4 was first seen at the Zuhai airshow in 2012 and in the absence of Chinese military interest it seems the aircraft is aimed at the export market.

 

Algeria has reportedly also been in discussions with China over the purchase of Xianglong unmanned aerial vehicles. Echorouk quoted an unnamed Algerian defence ministry colonel as saying that the UAV was successfully tested in Tamanrasset, southern Algeria, last year.

 

The Xianglong (Soar Dragon) is a jet-powered High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) aircraft designed by the Guizhou Aircraft Corporation of China, initially for use by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force. The Xianglong has a length of 14 metres, a height of 5 metres and a wingspan of 25 metres. It has a top speed of 750 km/h, endurance of up to 10 hours, and a maximum range of 7 000 km.

 

Tactical Weekly earlier this year reported that the Algerian Defence Ministry is said to have decided to go ahead with a programme to buy 90 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including attack UAVs.

 

Last year, Algeria expressed interest in the Adcom Systems Yabhon United 40 Block 5 UAV from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to meet its Medium-Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) requirement. According to Algerian daily El Watan, Algeria is negotiating with Russia to purchase 30 E95 unmanned aerial vehicles/target drones from Russia.

 

Algeria is looking for aerial reconnaissance platforms to track down various Maghreb-based terrorist groups, drug and arms traffickers and militants who have taken advantage of post-war chaos in Mali and Libya to destabilise the Sahel-Maghreb region.

 

Algeria currently flies Denel Seeker II UAVs and is believed to have ordered one new Seeker 400 system with three aircraft. The Seeker 400 is currently undergoing flight testing.

 

The North African country has previously expressed interest in General Atomics Predator/Reaper UAVs. It also has six King Air 350ER surveillance aircraft fitted with Gabbiano T-200 radars, Wescam Mx15i infrared cameras and other features for maritime and ground surveillance.

 

Since war clouds started gathering over northern Mali in November 2012, the Algerian army has deployed more than 12 000 personnel to secure the borders with Mali, Libya and Niger.

 

Algeria has increased its defence budget for 2014 and is actively seeking new tankers, transports, helicopters and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft. Last year Algeria evaluated the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III strategic transport and Airbus A330 MRTT tanker with an eye to replacing ageing Il-78 Midas tankers and acquiring a new transport aircraft. Algeria asked the two respective companies to conduct demonstrations, indicating the seriousness of these potential contracts.

 

Algeria is growing its defence spending by 6% through 2017, according to some estimates, as it modernises and re-equips to meet the challenge of insecurity and terrorism in the region.

Partager cet article
Repost0
11 mars 2014 2 11 /03 /mars /2014 18:35
132 milliards pour l'armée chinoise : qui doit en avoir peur?

 

 

09 mars 2014 François Clémenceau - Le Journal du Dimanche

 

La Chine a annoncé mercredi qu'elle allait augmenter de 12,2% son budget militaire en 2014, soit une nouvelle hausse à deux chiffres, alors que Pékin est impliqué dans de vifs différends territoriaux avec plusieurs de ses voisins.

 

À quelques jours d'intervalle, les États-Unis et la Chine viennent de faire connaître leurs intentions budgétaires en matière de défense. Le secrétaire américain à la Défense, Chuck Hagel, a révélé qu'il souhaitait voir le budget militaire du Pentagone revenir à la dimension qu'il avait avant les attentats du 11-Septembre. Concrètement, le renseignement et les forces spéciales seraient encore mieux dotés mais l'armée de terre américaine verrait ses effectifs réduits jusqu'à atteindre la taille qui était la sienne en 1940!

 

Parallèlement, la Chine a dévoilé ses chiffres de dépenses pour 2014 : 132 milliards de dollars, une hausse de 12,2% par rapport à l'an passé. Certes, ce volume est presque quatre fois inférieur à celui des États-Unis, qui gardent, et de loin, le plus gros budget de défense au monde.

 

Le pivot se fait attendre

 

Et aucun expert sérieux ne s'attendait à voir la Chine engager une baisse de ses dépenses. Comme l'avait montré en 2013 une étude du Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (Sipri), le budget militaire chinois a été multiplié par six depuis 1992. Les voisins de la Chine ne cessent de s'en inquiéter et la réduction du budget américain pourrait leur laisser croire qu'ils se retrouvent affaiblis face au potentiel de la menace chinoise. Le 13 février, signale Jonathan Pollack de la Brookings Institution, un officier supérieur des services de renseignement américains de la flotte du Pacifique, a rendu publics des exercices militaires chinois conduits à l'automne 2013, visant à "détruire les forces japonaises dans la mer orientale de Chine" et dont l'objectif final aurait été de s'emparer du fameux archipel contesté des îles Senkaku/Diaoyu.

 

Même si ces informations contiennent, selon Pollack, certains ingrédients de guerre psychologique, "les États-Unis sont directement concernés par cette montée des tensions" en Asie, a témoigné cette semaine Sheila Smith, l'experte du Japon au Council of Foreign Relations, lors d'une audition au Congrès. Pas étonnant donc, selon elle, que les forces américaines aient été particulièrement présentes et dissuasives lors des dernières provocations chinoises vis-à-vis du Japon et au moindre geste hostile de la Corée du Nord dirigé contre son voisin du Sud. "Les capacités de projection de la Chine restent faibles", analyse Bruno Tertrais, le patron de la Fondation de la recherche stratégique (FRS). "Depuis la guerre de Corée, la Chine n'a vraiment fait sortir ses troupes qu'en 1979 à la frontière vietnamienne et la génération actuelle des sous-officiers et des hommes du rang n'a aucune expérience des opérations militaires extérieures", ajoute-t-il.

Cela ne veut pas dire que la posture dépensière de la Chine et ses pressions politico-militaires ne doivent pas être prises au sérieux, mais que Barack Obama ferait bien de donner des gages afin de rassurer ses alliés, d'engager enfin son "pivot vers l'Asie". Car aucun autre pays au monde ne le fera à sa place dans cet espace qui sera le plus stratégique au monde dans la décennie à venir.

Partager cet article
Repost0
10 mars 2014 1 10 /03 /mars /2014 18:45
China and Djibouti strengthen defence ties

 

10 March 2014 by ADIT - defenceWeb

 

On February 27, China's Defence Minister Chang Wanquan visited Djibouti where his counterpart Hassan Darar Houffaneh appealed for military cooperation between the two countries.

 

Houffaneh also thanked China for continuously supporting Djibouti, since 1979. “It's particularly true that in the sub-region, and especially in Djibouti, most infrastructure projects are being funded by China,” he said, adding that the projects will reinforce regional integration. The Chinese defence minister replied: “The People's Republic of China is ready to support Djibouti to reinforce its military capacities and guarantee its security”.

 

China especially wants to strengthen the capacities of the Djiboutian Navy which does not have offshore patrol vessels; strengthen the capacity of the Air Force, which will soon acquire Chinese aircraft; provide assistance in the field of surveillance with the supply of radars; and support training by granting more seats in military training schools in China, especially in the aerospace, marine, defence, logistics and engineering fields.

 

China and Djibouti have cooperated in the areas of culture, education and health. Since 1986, China has provided scholarships to students from Djibouti. At present six Djiboutian students are studying in China. Since 1980, China has sent medical teams to Djibouti, with a Chinese medical team consisting of 10 personnel presently working in Djibouti.

Partager cet article
Repost0
10 mars 2014 1 10 /03 /mars /2014 13:40
Pékin cite trois priorités dans ses relations avec Moscou

 

 

PEKIN, 8 mars - RIA Novosti

 

Les trois missions prioritaires que Pékin et Moscou doivent remplir en 2014 consistent à porter les relations économiques sino-russes à un niveau plus élevé, à promouvoir les échanges entre les jeunes des deux pays et à défendre les résultats de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, a annoncé samedi le ministre chinois des Affaires étrangères Wang Yi.

 

"Premièrement, il est indispensable de passer à un niveau plus élevé de coopération économique et, en premier lieu, de réaliser une nouvelle percée dans la mise en œuvre de grands projets conjoints", a déclaré le ministre lors d'une conférence de presse tenue en marge de la session annuelle de l'Assemblé nationale populaire (parlement chinois).

 

Une autre tâche prioritaire consiste à "organiser une série de manifestations dans le cadre de l'Année des échanges amicaux entre les jeunes et à renforcer la base sociale des relations sino-russes", a indiqué le chef de la diplomatie chinois.

 

Enfin, la troisième priorité dans les relations entre les deux pays consiste, selon Wang Yi, à "défendre conjointement la victoire dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l'organisation du monde d'après-guerre".

 

Afin de réaliser ces trois objectifs, la Russie et la Chine doivent "renforcer leur confiance politique" réciproque et "approfondir leur coopération stratégique", a souligné le ministre chinois.

 

D'après lui, les relations sino-russes traversent actuellement "la meilleure étape de leur histoire".

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories