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9 novembre 2015 1 09 /11 /novembre /2015 08:35
HMAS Stuart sailors stand at ease on the forecastle as they and HMAS Arunta prepare to come alongside in Zhanjiang, China

HMAS Stuart sailors stand at ease on the forecastle as they and HMAS Arunta prepare to come alongside in Zhanjiang, China

 

4 novembre 2015. Portail des Sous-Marins

 

Plusieurs bâtiments de la marine australiennes, les HMAS Arunta, Stuart et Sirius, ont rencontré en mer de Chine de Sud la frégate française Vendémiaire.

 

Les bâtiments s’étaient donnés rendez-vous le 3 novembre dans les eaux internationales au large du Vietnam.

 

Cette rencontre constituait une occasion pour les marines australienne et française de s’entraîner ensemble et d’améliorer le niveau d’interopérabilité et la connaissance de la situation maritime dans la région.

 

Les 4 bâtiments ont effectué une série d’exercices de routine : manœuvre, opérations de vol en hélicoptère, ravitaillement à la mer avec le Sirius et exercice de tir réel avec des armes de petit calibre sur une cible statique.

 

Le Vendémiaire devrait faire escale à Sydney en décembre. Il vient d’effectuer une escale en Chine, à Zhanjiang du 27 au 30 octobre.

 

Le chef d’état-major de la marine australienne, le vice-amiral David Johnston, a déclaré : « La conduite de ces exercices est une part importante de la construction de bonnes relations. Le Vendémiaire est bien connu dans notre région, l’occasion de s’entraîner avec lui est toujours bénéfique. »

 

Référence : MarineLink (Etats-Unis)

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9 novembre 2015 1 09 /11 /novembre /2015 08:20
The ALFS integrated dipping sonar system enables the MH-60R to accomplish assigned undersea warfare missions. (Photo credit Lockheed Martin)

The ALFS integrated dipping sonar system enables the MH-60R to accomplish assigned undersea warfare missions. (Photo credit Lockheed Martin)


06.11.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

Bon an, mal an Raytheon Company et Thales Underwater Systems, Brest, produisent une vingtaine de sonars de type AN/AQS-22 Airborne Low Frequency Sonar (ALFS). Les deux firmes sont associés pour la production de ce sonar qui équipe les hélicoptères MH-60R de l'US Navy.

La dernière commande en date porte sur 22 sonars (20 pour l'US Navy et 2 pour la marine saoudienne). 59% du marché sera réalisé à Brest par TUS. Montant de ce marché: 65,8 millions de dollars.

 

L'avis du Pentagone:

"Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Portsmouth, Rhode Island, is being awarded a $65,801,757 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-13-C-0012) for the procurement of 22 MH-60R full-rate production Lot XIII Airborne Low Frequency Sonar systems for the Navy (20), and the government of Saudi Arabia (2), including associated program management support. Work will be performed in Brest, France (59 percent); Portsmouth, Rhode Island (37 percent); and Johnstown, Pennsylvania (4 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2018. Fiscal 2015 aircraft procurement (Navy) and foreign military sales funds in the amount of $65,801,757 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Navy ($59,819,779; 91 percent), and the government of Saudi Arabia ($5,981,978; 9 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity."

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 18:36
photo MSF

photo MSF

 

Nov 6, 2015  defense-aerospace.com

(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Nov 5, 2015)

 

DoD Receives Initial Report of Kunduz Hospital Strike

 

WASHINGTON --- Defense Department officials have received and read a 13-page initial review conducted by Doctors Without Borders of the Oct. 3 strike at their hospital in Kunduz, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. Jeff Davis said here today.
A full investigation is underway in coordination with Afghanistan’s government to “determine exactly what happened” when the hospital came under fire, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said on the day of the strike.
“We appreciate [Doctors Without Borders] sharing this report with us in advance of its release,” Davis told defense reporters, “and it is being made available to our investigators who continue their efforts.”

Initial Statement
In an initial statement Oct. 3, Army Col. Brian Tribus, a spokesman for U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said U.S. forces conducted an airstrike in Kunduz at 2:15 a.m. local time that “may have caused collateral damage to a nearby medical facility.”
A statement later that day said the airstrike was targeting insurgents who were directly firing on U.S. service members advising and assisting Afghan security forces in the city, near a Doctors Without Borders facility.
“Since this tragic incident we have worked closely with [Doctors Without Borders] to determine the facts surrounding it,” Davis said, noting that yesterday Resolute Support Commander Army Gen. John F. Campbell met in Kabul with Doctors Without Borders representatives.

Investigation Continues
“We continue to work closely with [Doctors Without Borders] in identifying the victims, both those killed and wounded, so that we can conclude our investigations and proceed with follow-on actions, to include condolence payments,” Davis added.
The department also is committed to working with Doctors Without Borders to determine the full extent of damage to the hospital so it can be repaired in full, he said.
The NATO Resolute Support Combined Civilian Casualty Assessment Team, or CCAT, investigation is ongoing and is being conducted simultaneously with the U.S. investigation, which is being conducted in accordance with Army Regulation 15-6, Davis said.

Army Regulation 15-6
Army Regulation 15-6, according to Army manuals and documents, establishes procedures for investigations and boards of officers. AR 15-6 procedures may be used on their own, such as in an investigation to determine facts and circumstances, or they may be incorporated by reference into directives governing specific kinds of investigations, such as line-of-duty investigations.
Davis said that when the 15-6 investigation is complete it will go to U.S. Central Command and officials there will formally review and release the report.
A key element of the investigation still underway is the effort to identify the casualties, he said, noting that the investigators are working closely with Doctors Without Borders on that.
“We’re committed to conducting investigations that are thorough and transparent,” Davis said, adding that the department leadership again expresses their “deepest condolences to the families of those affected by this tragic incident.”

 

Note RP Defense : initial link on DoD website : http://www.defense.gov/News-Article-View/Article/627858/dod-receives-initial-report-of-kunduz-hospital-strike

now 

http://www.defense.gov/News-Article-View/Article/627858/dod-receives-initial-report-of-kunduz-hospital-strike source RP Defense

http://www.defense.gov/News-Article-View/Article/627858/dod-receives-initial-report-of-kunduz-hospital-strike source RP Defense

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 18:35
Attack on Kunduz Trauma Centre: Initial MSF Internal Review


Nov 06, 2015 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: Medecins Sans Frontière; issued Nov 05, 2015)

 

Hospitals have protected status under the rules of war. And yet in the early hours of 3 October, the MSF hospital in Kunduz came under relentless and brutal aerial attack by US forces.

Patients burned in their beds, medical staff were decapitated and lost limbs, and others were shot by the circling AC-130 gunship while fleeing the burning building. At least 30 MSF staff and patients were killed.

This week, MSF concluded an initial review of the facts before, during and in the aftermath of the airstrikes. Although our internal review is an ongoing process, we have decided to share these initial outcomes with the public, to counter speculation and to be transparent. Details that could identify individuals have been removed. Explanatory footnotes have been added in places where an external reader may need additional clarification.

This is the view from inside the hospital. What we lack is the view from outside the hospital - what happened within the military chains of command.

The facts compiled in this review confirm our initial observations: the MSF trauma centre was fully functioning as a hospital with 105 patients admitted and surgeries ongoing at the time of the US airstrikes; the MSF rules in the hospital were implemented and respected, including the ‘no weapons’ policy; MSF was in full control of the hospital before and at the time of the airstrikes; there were no armed combatants within the hospital compound and there was no fighting from or in the direct vicinity of the trauma centre before the airstrikes.

What we know is that we were running a hospital treating patients, including wounded combatants from both sides – this was not a ‘Taliban base.’

The question remains as to whether our hospital lost its protected status in the eyes of the military forces engaged in this attack - and if so, why. The answer does not lie within the MSF hospital. Those responsible for requesting, ordering and approving the airstrikes hold these answers.

We know that there were many different forces fighting in the area around our hospital: special forces, regular army, police and the armed opposition. Each of these forces may have been operating according to different understandings or interpretations of how international humanitarian law applies to medical work in war. Any ambiguity has deadly consequences for our ability to work on frontlines.

What we demand is simple: a functioning hospital caring for patients, such as the one in Kunduz, cannot simply lose its protection and be attacked; wounded combatants are patients and must be free from attack and treated without discrimination; medical staff should never be punished or attacked for providing treatment to wounded combatants.

On 7 October 2015, MSF launched a call for an independent investigation by the International Humanitarian Fact Finding Commission. Although the IHFFC has made itself available for an investigation, the United States and Afghan Governments have yet to consent to this request. Consenting to the IHFFC is a critical step in demonstrating a commitment to the Geneva Conventions. Today, we are handing over this internal report to both the public and the IHFFC.

The attack on our hospital in Kunduz destroyed our ability to treat patients at a time when we were needed the most.

We need a clear commitment that the act of providing medical care will never make us a target. We need to know whether the rules of war still apply.


Click here for the full report, on the MSF website.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 17:35
photo USAF

photo USAF

 

07 November, 2015 by James Drew - FG

 

Dubai   - Australia still hopes to acquire an armed, long-range unmanned air vehicle in a similar class to the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-9 Reaper, but moving forward with a “recommended project” depends on the outcome of a pending force structure review.

 

That review, the Defence White Paper, takes into consideration the Royal Australian Air Force’s (RAAF) request for a medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) UAV, but is awaiting examination and release by the country’s new prime minister Malcolm Turnbull.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 14:30
Shadow M2 - photo Textron Systems

Shadow M2 - photo Textron Systems

 

07 November, 2015 by James Drew - FG

 

Dubai - Textron is determined to arm its “Version 2” and next-generation “Mark 2” Shadow tactical unmanned aircraft with its lightweight Fury weapons even without serious interest from the US Army, which is more keen to diversify the weaponry available on its General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-1C Gray Eagles.

 

The all-digital RQ-7B V2 Shadow entered service with the army in late 2014, and Textron expects to deliver 20-25 systems annually, each consisting of four aircraft and two ground stations, over the next five years as the service replaces legacy platforms. Meanwhile, Textron continues to market the new Shadow “M2” air vehicle domestically and abroad, touting its more powerful engine, payload capacity, endurance and potential satellite communications capability for beyond-line-of-sight reconnaissance missions. The M2 and Textron’s Aerosonde small UAV are both on display at this year’s Dubai air ahow, along with the Fury miniature munition that Textron hopes will arm modern RQ-7 variants as well as other manned and unmanned platforms.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 13:30
photo Dassault Aviation

photo Dassault Aviation

 

06 nov. 2015 Vincent Lamigeon, grand reporter à Challenges - Supersonique

 

Le salon de Dubaï 2011 avait vu le coup de sang du prince héritier d'Abou Dhabi, cheikh Mohamed ben Zayed, contre le prix du Rafale. L’édition 2013 avait vu les commandes monumentales de 777X (259 avions) et d’A380 (50 exemplaires), le montant total des contrats atteignant 162,6 milliards de dollars. Qu’attendre du millésime 2015 ? Pas grand-chose, à en croire les spécialistes. « Du fait des grandes commandes précédentes, le total des commandes du salon va être bien plus faible que celui des éditions précédentes, écrit Ben Moores, analyste Chez IHS Aerospace, Defence & Security. En fait, il pourrait y avoir un manque record de commandes. »

 

[…]

 

Au rayon militaire, les négociations avec Abu Dhabi pour l’achat de 60 Rafale avancent bien, d’aucuns évoquant même la possibilité qu’un contrat soit signé avant celui de l’Inde. Les industriels restent cependant prudents, évoquant plutôt une échéance début 2016.

 

Lire l’article

 

Note RP Defense:

voir Le Qatar a choisi le Rafale

voir Dassault Aviation livre ses premiers Rafale à la République Arabe d’Égypte

 

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 12:45
photo EUTM Mali

photo EUTM Mali

 

3 November 2015 by EUTM Mali

 

Nous sommes vendredi matin, sur le terrain de manœuvre de l’école militaire malienne de Koulikoro. La température est déjà de 35 degrés, alors qu’il est seulement 09:00. Une légère brise vient refroidit l’air, et apporte un petit moment de soulagement pour le Lieutenant B. des forces armées italiennes compte tenu des fortes chaleurs pendant les derniers jours de formation. Sa principale mission : entrainer 12 soldats maliens au “Guidage aérien tactique avancé” en trois semaines. Il doit en outre former trois soldats maliens qui deviendront eux-mêmes devenir formateurs. Le but de cette formation est de permettre aux soldats de diriger des avions dans des missions diverses. Ces missions peuvent être « la reconnaissance d’une route avant de faire passer un convoi » ou l’« appui en cas d’attaque contre une position ennemie ». Pour le Lieutenant B. et ses trois camarades, c’est un travail des plus intéressants. Leur soutien permet une collaboration étroite entre l’armée malienne et la Force aérienne malienne. Cela fait environ trois ans, que les soldats maliens ont terminé leur formation de base, laquelle dure environ huit semaines. Toutefois, la formation en « Guidage aérien tactique avancé » est beaucoup plus compliquée que l’exécution de simple patrouilles. Depuis leur formation de base, ils ont été en service actif. Malheureusement, ils n’ont pas eu l’occasion d’appliquer leurs connaissances dans la pratique, et bien sûr une grande partie de celle-ci a été perdue.

Suite de l’article

 

English version

photo EUTM Mali

photo EUTM Mali

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 12:20
Flying Launch and Recovery System or FLARES – photo Insitu

Flying Launch and Recovery System or FLARES – photo Insitu

 

November 6, 2015 Robert Beckhusen – War is Boring

 

Say goodbye to the ScanEagle's 4,000-pound ground catapult

 

Here’s one way to find a new use for an old drone — stick it underneath another drone which serves as a flying mothership. Insitu, a Boeing-owned company which manufactures the tiny ScanEagle surveillance drone, recently showed off a video of a quadcopter carrying the ScanEagle into the air and launching it … like a flying aircraft carrier. The ScanEagle then heads back to its quadcopter and snags a retrieval line. The whole system, known as the Flying Launch and Recovery System or FLARES, is a drone-carrier drone.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 08:45
photo tchadinfos

photo tchadinfos

 

N’DJAMENA, 7 novembre (Xinhua)

 

Les Forces armées tchadiennes d’intervention au Cameroun (FATIC), de retour de leur expédition contre la secte terroriste Boko Haram, ont été accueillis en héros samedi matin dans la capitale, a constaté un journaliste de Xinhua sur place.

 

Sur un parcours long de plusieurs kilomètres, allant de la frontière du Cameroun à la Place de la Nation, en face du Palais présidentiel, les N’Djaménois se sont massés de bonne heure pour ces héros juchés sur leurs chars et véhicules Toyota tout-terrain.

Selon le général Bénaïndo Tatola, ministre délégué à la Présidence chargé de la Défense nationale, ce retour du contingent tchadien se justifie par “la prise en compte de sa zone de responsabilité par la force mixte multinationale de la Commission du bassin du lac Tchad et le Bénin qui se chargera de mener désormais les opérations contre le groupe terroriste Boko Haram dans cet espace”.

 

Le 14 janvier 2015, l’Assemblée nationale du Tchad avait autorisé le gouvernement à envoyer les troupes aider les armées camerounaises, nigériennes et nigérianes qui faisaient face à l’expansion de la secte islamiste.

 

Quatre mois plus tard, comme l’exige la Constitution, les députés tchadiens ont voté une loi portant prolongation de la présence de leurs forces armées engagées dans le cadre de la lutte conjointe régionale contre Boko Haram.

 

Le bilan de cette intervention, fourni par l’Etat-major tchadien après les quatre premiers mois, reste lourd: 71 morts soldats tués et 416 autres blessés.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 07:20
Secretary of Defense  Ashton Carter photo R. Reagan Foundation ‏.jpg

Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter photo R. Reagan Foundation ‏.jpg

 

07 novembre 2015 Romandie.com (AFP)

 

Simi Valley (Etats-Unis) - Les Etats-Unis adaptent leur posture opérationnelle pour contrer toute agression russe, a déclaré samedi le secrétaire américain à la Défense Ashton Carter.

 

Nous adaptons notre posture opérationnelle et nos plans d'urgence dans le travail que nous faisons -nous-mêmes et avec nos alliés- pour dissuader la Russie d'une agression, et pour contribuer à réduire la vulnérabilité de nos alliés et de nos partenaires, a déclaré M. Carter au cours d'un forum sur les questions de défense en Californie.

 

Le chef du Pentagone a précisé que Washington modernisait son arsenal nucléaire et investissait dans des moyens de haute technologie comme les drones, les bombardiers à long rayon d'action, les lasers, les canons électro-magnétiques et la guerre électronique.

 

M. Carter a fait allusion à de nouveaux moyens militaires surprenants, ajoutant qu'il ne pouvait pas vraiment les décrire maintenant.

 

En outre, nous mettons à jour et perfectionnons nos plans de dissuasion et de défense compte tenu du changement de comportement de la Russie, a ajouté M. Carter au cours de ce forum à la Ronald Reagan [Foundation] à Simi Valley.

 

Washington veut aussi développer ses capacités dans le domaine des campagnes d'information pour faire passer la vérité, et dans celui des sanctions ciblées qui aient un impact sur la Russie.

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8 novembre 2015 7 08 /11 /novembre /2015 07:20
Le ministre américain de la Défense met en garde contre un conflit en mer de Chine méridionale

Sec of Defense Ashton Carter photo R. Reagan Foundation

 

08 novembre 2015 Romandie.com (AFP)

 

Simi Valley (Etats-Unis) - Les Etats-Unis sont profondément inquiets d'un risque de conflit en mer de Chine méridionale en raison des revendications territoriales de plusieurs Etats, à commencer par la Chine, a déclaré samedi le secrétaire américain à la Défense, Ashton Carter.

 

Le ministre a également affirmé que Washington adaptait sa posture opérationnelle pour contrer toute agression russe, au cours d'un forum sur les questions de défense au sein de la bibliothèque présidentielle Ronald Reagan située à Simi Valley, en Californie.

 

S'exprimant au terme d'une tournée de huit jours, qui l'a vu rencontrer plusieurs homologues de la région Asie-Pacifique, M. Carter a déclaré que les profondes inquiétudes des Etats-Unis concernant le rythme et la portée des revendications territoriales en mer de Chine méridionale étaient largement partagées dans la région.

 

Ce haut responsable américain s'est dit préoccupé par les perspectives de militarisation accrue, ainsi que par le potentiel qu'ont ces activités d'accroître le risque de mauvais calculs ou de conflit entre les Etats ayant des revendications.

 

La Chine proclame sa souveraineté sur la quasi-totalité de la mer de Chine méridionale, dont certaines zones sont également revendiquées par le Vietnam, la Malaisie, les Philippines et le sultanat de Brunei.

 

Les Etats-Unis ont provoqué le mécontentement de la Chine en faisant croiser le 28 octobre un destroyer américain près d'îlots artificiels mis en place par Pékin dans l'archipel des Spratleys.

 

Le forum Reagan sur la défense nationale réunit chaque année des dizaines de personnalités de la défense des Etats-Unis, y compris des responsables politiques des deux camps, afin d'évoquer la politique américaine dans ce domaine.

 

M. Carter a utilisé cette plateforme pour s'en prendre aux manoeuvres militaires de la Russie.

 

En mer, dans les airs, dans l'espace et dans le cyberespace, les acteurs russes se sont engagés dans des activités provocatrices, a-t-il estimé.

 

Et, plus perturbant, les rodomontades russes autour du nucléaire posent question, selon lui.

 

Nous mettons à jour et perfectionnons nos plans de dissuasion et de défense compte tenu du changement de comportement de la Russie, a dit le chef du Pentagone.

 

Nous adaptons notre posture opérationnelle et nos plans d'urgence dans le travail que nous faisons - nous-mêmes et avec nos alliés - pour dissuader la Russie d'une agression, et pour contribuer à réduire la vulnérabilité de nos alliés et de nos partenaires, a-t-il encore affirmé.

 

M. Carter a précisé que Washington modernisait son arsenal nucléaire et investissait dans des moyens de haute technologie comme les drones, les bombardiers à long rayon d'action, les lasers, les canons électro-magnétiques et la guerre électronique.

 

Il a fait allusion à de nouveaux moyens militaires surprenants, ajoutant qu'il ne pouvait pas vraiment les décrire maintenant.

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 18:40
Kiev affirme avoir achevé le retrait de ses armes dans l'Est

 

07.11.2015 Romandie.com (ats)

 

L'Ukraine a affirmé samedi avoir achevé la dernière étape du retrait de ses armes le long de la ligne du front dans l'Est rebelle prorusse. Des heurts sporadiques s'y sont pourtant encore intensifiés ces derniers jours malgré la trêve.

L'armée ukrainienne a retiré samedi des mortiers de calibre de 82 millimètres des villages de Piski et Opytné, à proximité de l'aéroport de Donetsk, qui a été pendant des mois théâtre de combats acharnés, a annoncé un porte-parole militaire ukrainien Oleksandre Zavtonov.

Des journalistes de l'AFP sur place ont observé un convoi militaire transportant notamment ses mortiers, quitter les positions ukrainiennes à Piski pour se diriger vers un terrain de stockage d'armes retirées dans la zone sous contrôle de Kiev.

Un des soldats ukrainiens, interrogés par l'AFP, a déclaré ne disposer désormais que d'armes à feu. "Nous ne répondons pas aux provocations ou tirs des rebelles. Mais si on est forcé à se défendre, nous ne pouvons désormais nous servir que de fusils et Kalachnikov ou encore des pierres", a ironisé Edouard, 39 ans, membre de la 93e brigade de l'armée ukrainienne.

 

Déjà plus de 8000 morts

Il s'agit de la dernière étape du retrait des armes par les Ukrainiens dans la région de Donetsk. L'Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe (OSCE) chargée de surveiller ce processus n'a pas commenté pour l'heure ces déclarations de Kiev.

Les séparatistes prorusses de la république autoproclamée de Donetsk ont pour leur part affirmé avoir achevé le retrait des armes sur leur territoire jeudi. Dans la région voisine de Lougansk, les deux parties ont annoncé déjà en octobre avoir terminé ce retrait.

L'Ukraine et les rebelles engagés depuis avril 2014 dans un conflit ayant fait plus de 8000 morts sont parvenus fin septembre à un accord sur le retrait des chars, pièces d'artillerie d'un calibre inférieur à 100 mm et mortiers, dans une zone de 15 km d'une part et d'autre de la ligne de front.

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 18:30
GB: un avion de touristes allant à Charm el-Cheikh est passé près d'un missile en août

 

07 novembre 2015 Romandie.com (AFP)

 

Londres - Un avion Thomson Airways transportant 189 touristes de Londres à la station balnéaire égyptienne de Charm el-Cheikh est passé, en août dernier, à moins de 300 mètres d'un missile peu avant son atterrissage, ont révélé samedi les médias britanniques.

 

Un porte-parole du gouvernement britannique a confirmé cet incident, affirmant, dans un communiqué, qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une attaque ciblée mais qu'il était lié à un exercice de routine de l'armée égyptienne.

 

Nous avions enquêté sur l'incident à l'époque des faits et avions conclu qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une attaque ciblée mais que c'était très probablement lié à des exercices de routine menés par l'armée égyptienne dans la région à l'époque, a indiqué ce porte-parole du gouvernement.

 

Selon une source citée par le Daily Mail, à l'origine de l'information, le copilote était aux commandes au moment des faits mais le pilote était dans le cockpit et a vu le missile venir en direction de l'avion.

 

Il a ordonné que l'avion tourne à gauche pour éviter le missile qui se trouvait à environ 1.000 pieds (300 mètres) de distance, ajoute cette source non identifiée.

 

La compagnie aérienne a également confirmé cet événement, ajoutant que l'enquête menée par le ministère britannique des Transports (DfT) avait à l'époque jugé sûr les vols à destination de la station balnéaire égyptienne.

 

Thomson Airways peut confirmer que l'équipage du vol TOM 476 a fait état d'un événement le 23 août, a indiqué un porte-parole de la compagnie.

 

Après avoir atterri à Charm el-Cheikh, une évaluation initiale a été menée et l'événement a été immédiatement signalé au ministère britannique des Transports (DfT) conformément au protocole établi, a-t-il ajouté.

 

Le DfT a mené une enquête complète en liaison avec d'autres experts du gouvernement britannique, selon la même source.

 

Après étude des détails de ce cas, l'enquête a conclu qu'il n'y avait pas de motif de préoccupation et qu'il était sûr de poursuivre les vols à destination de Charm el-Cheikh, conclut-il.

 

Les pilotes ont effectué des mesures d'évitement et sont parvenus à poser en toute sécurité l'avion, précise la presse britannique, ajoutant que les passagers n'ont pas été informés de l'incident.

 

Mercredi, Londres avait suspendu tous les vols au départ de Charm el-Cheikh et à destination du Royaume-Uni, le Premier ministre David Cameron mettant en avant des inquiétudes sur la sécurité de ces vols après des informations des services de renseignement faisant état de la probabilité qu'un engin explosif ait été à l'origine de l'accident.

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 17:45
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

 

06/11/2015 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Du 27 octobre au 5 novembre 2015, après plusieurs semaines de patrouille opérationnelle dans le Golfe de Guinée, le BPC Mistral a participé à la 4e édition annuelle de l’exercice NEMO (Navy’s Exercice for Maritime Operations). Cet entraînement multinational réalisé par la mission Corymbe s’inscrit dans le cadre de la coopération mise en œuvre avec les partenaires riverains du Golfe de Guinée signataires des accords de Yaoundé*.

 

Cet exercice visait à tester la capacité des Marines riveraines à agir de façon coordonnée dans le domaine de la sécurité maritime dans le golfe de Guinée, notamment dans la lutte contre les trafics illicites et les activités de piraterie. Il a également permis de perfectionner leur interopérabilité et d’enrichir leurs procédures d’engagement, en s’inspirant du modèle de l’action de l’État en mer. Le 27 octobre 2015, l’exercice a débuté au large du Ghana avec une quinzaine de bâtiments, réunissant notamment le pétrolier ravitailleur britannique Gold Rover et le patrouilleur espagnol Centinela. Cette participation britannique et espagnole et la présence d’un officier de liaison danois à bord du BPC Mistral illustre la volonté des partenaires européens présents dans la région de renforcer leur coordination au bénéfice des marines africaines, pour contribuer à la sécurité maritime. Le soir même, le BPC retrouvait le Gold Rover pour un ravitaillement à la mer, démontrant ainsi des capacités élevées d'interopérabilité. Un officier danois, un officier espagnol et trois chefs de quart camerounais étaient présents à bord du BPC pour échanger et travailler avec les marins français.

Suite de l’article

 

*Le processus de Yaoundé, créé en 2013 et rassemblant tous les pays riverains du Golfe de Guinée, œuvre à la prise en compte au niveau régional des enjeux liés à la sécurité des espaces maritimes.

photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 17:30
Four critical questions on Russia’s strategic goals in Syria answered by CSIS

 

Oct 29, 2015 By Olga Oliker - csis.org/publication/russia-syria

 

Q: What is Russia trying to accomplish with its military operation in Syria?

A: Russia’s primary goal in Syria is to support the Assad government and help it to stay in power. To do this, Russia, working with Syria and Iran, is targeting groups opposed to Assad. Russia is doing this for several reasons. First, Assad is a long-term friend of Moscow’s. Second, Russia’s position has long been that governments have a right to do what they want within their borders, without foreign interference, including (perhaps especially) putting down opposition movements. Third, Russia truly believes that Assad is Syria’s best hope for stability, and does not see a plausible likelihood of a moderate opposition taking power.

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 17:20
Countermine System (GBU-61) credits: US Navy

Countermine System (GBU-61) credits: US Navy

 

November 2, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The United States has developed a new way to deliver naval mines; by attaching a JDAM glide and satellite navigation kit to naval mines designed to be dropped, like dumb bombs, into shallow water. The JDAM mine can glide 70 kilometers thus avoiding many enemy air defenses. This avoids risking aircraft, which typically have to come down low to drop the air delivered mines. It also means you don’t have to risk your nuclear subs for the delivery of these mines. Subs have long been an effective way to plant mines in enemy waters. The JDAM approach does not eliminate all risk from anti-aircraft systems. China and Russia have modern S-300 systems with ranges of over a hundred miles. But the farther away the attacking aircraft are the less they are at risk. That’s because American aircraft go into combat with EW (electronic warfare aircraft) and EW devices on all aircraft. That provides a lot of protection but it is not 100 percent and the less time you spend in the danger zone the less risk you are exposed to.

 

Meanwhile the United States and its allies have to spend a lot more effort figuring out how to effectively deal with enemy naval mines. The few enemies the West has possess a lot of these mines. Iran has a few thousand naval mines and that is a small arsenal compared to Russia (over 200,000), China (over 100,000) and North Korea (over 50,000). It is generally agreed that all these mines are a serious danger. While often ignored, naval mines are a formidable weapon. But these passive weapons just don't get any respect. The historical record indicates otherwise.

 

Modern naval mines were widely used for the first time over a century ago, during the Russo-Japanese war (1904- 1905). These were contact mines, floating in shallow water and kept in place with an anchor and chain. When the tide was right they would be just below the surface, ready to explode whenever struck by a ship. Some 2,000 of these mines were used to destroy sixteen ships during the Russo-Japanese war. That's one ship lost for every 125 mines used.

 

During World War I (1914-18), modern mine tactics and clearing methods evolved. Thousands of mines were laid to provide defensive barriers against enemy movement in the North Sea. Mines were also used offensively by secretly placing them across known enemy sea routes. More than 1,000 merchant and war ships were lost because of the 230,000 mines used. That's over 200 mines used for every ship lost.

 

During World War II there was a major effort to develop better mine clearing methods to deal with an even larger number of mines. During World War II a total of 2,665 ships were lost or damaged to 100,000 offensive mines. That's one ship for every 37 mines. Some 208,000 mines were used defensively to inhibit enemy movement and tie up his resources.

 

Naval mines achieved several striking successes during World War II. In the Pacific naval mines proved more destructive to the Japanese war effort than the atom bombs. During a 10 week period between April and August 1945, 12,000 mines were delivered to the Japanese coast by American bombers. These destroyed 1,250,000 tons of Japanese shipping (670 ships hit, 431 destroyed). That's 18 mines for each ship hit. The Americans had air superiority, so losses during these 1,500 missions amounted to only 15 planes, most of them accidents. Had these missions been flown against opposition, losses would have been between 30 and 60 aircraft, plus similar losses to their fighter escorts. Either way it was a stunning success for naval mines,

 

A conventional submarine campaign was also waged against Japanese shipping using mines. Comparisons between subs using mines and torpedoes are interesting. A hundred submarines were involved in a campaign that ran for 45 months from December, 1941 to August, 1945. Some 4.8 million tons of enemy shipping was sunk with torpedoes. For every U.S. submarine sailor lost using submarine launched torpedoes, 560 tons of enemy ships were sunk. During the mine campaign 3,500 tons were sunk for each U.S. fatality. On a cost basis the difference was equally stark. Counting the cost of lost mine laying aircraft (B- 29's at $500,000 each) or torpedo armed submarine ($5 million each), we find that each ton of sunk shipping cost six dollars when using mines and fifty-five dollars when using submarines. This data was classified as secret until the 1970s. It indicates that mines might have been more effective than torpedoes, even if the mines were delivered by submarine.

 

The Germans waged a minelaying campaign off the east coast of the United States between 1942 and 1944. Only 317 mines were used, which sank or damaged 11 ships. This was a ratio of 29 mines used for each ship hit. More importantly eight major ports were closed for a total of 40 days. One port, Charleston, South Carolina, was closed for 16 days, tying up not only merchant shipping but the thousands of men, warships, and aircraft dealing with the situation. American submarines also waged a limited mine campaign in the Pacific. For 658 mines used, 54 ships were sunk or damaged (12 mines per ship). No subs were lost. Considerable Japanese resources were tied up dealing with the mines. On the Palau atoll the port was closed by the mines and not reopened until the war ended. Even surface ships were used to lay mines. Three thousand mines were laid by destroyers. Only 12 ships were hit but these were barrier fields, not the ambush type mine fields that a submarine can create by sneaking into an enemy held area.

 

In Korea during the early 1950s, the Soviets provided North Korea with 3,000 mines, many of 1904 vintage. These were used to defend Wonson harbor. It took several weeks for UN forces to clear these, at a loss of a dozen ships hit. Half of these ships were destroyed.

 

During the Vietnam War over 300,000 American naval mines were used, primarily in North Vietnamese rivers. The vast majority were not built as mines but were aerial bombs equipped with magnetic sensors instead of fuzes. These bombs/mines used a small parachute to insure that no damage occurred on landing. In shallow water these makeshift weapons sat on the bottom and performed as well as mines. Haiphong Harbor was actually mined with 11,000 of these "destructors," as the US air force called them, and less than a hundred conventional mines. Haiphong Harbor was shut down completely for months, and it took years to clear out all the American mines. The "destructor" mine design was so successful that it is still in use, using more modern electronics, as the Mk 62 mine. This is one of the mines delivered via JDAM.

 

During the 1991 Gulf War the Iraqis laid over a thousand mines off the Iraqi and Kuwaiti coast. The predominantly American naval forces did not have sufficient mine sweeping resources to deal with this situation and had a helicopter carrier and cruiser hit and damaged while trying to clear the area. This effectively prevented any U.S. amphibious operations, although the Marines were not going to be used for a landing anyway. It took over a month of mine clearing after the fighting ceased to eliminate all the mines. In the meantime, two U.S. warships were damaged by these mines.  In 2003, the Iraqis again tried to use mines, but were hampered by prompt American, British, and Kuwaiti action.

 

In any future war naval mines will again surprise everyone with how effective they are. It is feared that terrorists might get their hands on some bottom mines, but so far, there do not appear to have been any attempts.

 

The only American minesweeper ships are the twelve Avengers. These are 72.3 meter (224 foot) long ships that draw only 4.8 meters (15 feet) of water, enabling them to operate close to shore. The crews are supposed to be trained in navigating such shallow areas. The Avengers are armed with two .50 cal. (12.7mm) machine guns, two 7.62mm machine guns, two 40mm automatic grenade launchers, and have a crew of 84. Most Avengers are stationed in the Persian Gulf, operating out of Bahrain or in the Pacific and based in Sasebo, Japan. The “home port” for the Avengers is San Diego, California.

 

The U.S. Navy needs these minesweepers because replacements (minesweeping helicopters and minesweeping versions of the new LCS ship) have been delayed by technical problems. Meanwhile the U.S. has upgraded the sonars on its Avenger class ships. The new AN/SQQ-32(V)4 mine hunting sonar improves the ability of the sonar to spot mines on sea bottoms cluttered with other stuff (natural or manmade). In many parts of the world shallow coastal waters are used as a dumping ground for junk that won’t float ashore. This has been found to help hide bottom mines. The Avengers have also received new engines. The four original diesel engines in each Avenger have never been very reliable. With their new engines the Avengers can still move at up to 27 kilometers an hour. Normally, however, the Avengers move much more slowly (3-4 kilometers an hour) when searching for mines. The Avengers also received improved hydraulics and new mine destruction systems.

 

The upgrade is part of an attempt to deal with delays in the arrival of the LCS class ships, or at least the ones equipped for mine hunting. So for the last decade the navy has been hustling to refurbish its existing Avengers. The 3,000 ton LCS ships are designed for minesweeping (and a lot of other jobs) but the 1,400 ton Avengers specialize in minesweeping. Built mostly of wood and very little iron, the fourteen Avengers entered the fleet between 1987 and 1994, and twelve are still in service. The upgrades enable the surviving Avengers to remain in service at least until 2016 and probably until the end of the decade.

 

The navy also had a dozen smaller Osprey class coastal mine hunters (900 tons displacement, crew of 51), but these were all given away to foreign navies and are to be replaced by the LCS and new minesweeping helicopters.

 

The navy has also equipped helicopters for mine clearing. But the navy is having a very difficult time maintaining its force of 30 MH-53E helicopters. This aircraft are the only ones that can tow a sled containing naval mine detecting gear. This sort of thing is called AMCM (Airborne Mine Countermeasures) and is considered essential in areas, like the Persian Gulf, where the enemy (Iran) might use a lot of naval mines that would have to be cleared quickly in wartime.

 

The MH-53E is an update of the original 1960s era CH-53 and entered service in the early 1980s. Fifty MH-53Es were built and they have been worked hard ever since. That’s why only 30 are left and few of them are fit to fly at any one time. Originally the navy planned to retire the MH-53Es in 2008, but replacements (lighter sleds that could be pulled by smaller and more modern helicopters) did not work out as expected. So retirement was pushed to 2012, then 2017 and currently the navy hopes to keep some MH-53Es operational into the 2020s.

 

Meanwhile efforts continue to develop lighter equipment for the mine hunting task. Some of these projects have had limited success. The AQS-24A mine-hunting system looks like a torpedo with extra fins and attachment. It is lowered into the water and dragged by the helicopter at speeds of up to 34 kilometers an hour. The AQS-24A contains a high resolution sonar that seeks out mines than lay on the sea bottom, waiting for ships to pass over. The bottom mine then detonates if a ship type it was programmed to attack is detected. The U.S. Navy has been using this mine hunting approach since the 1980s. The original sled system went through several major upgrades and is considered very reliable and effective. The MH-53E sled is still able to carry more equipment and sweep a larger area faster.

 

The U.S. Navy has also developed a complementary system, ALMDS (Airborne Laser Mine Detection System). Designed to operate from the MH-60S helicopter, ALMDS uses a Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging blue-green laser to detect, and identify naval mines near the surface. Unlike the AQS-24A, ALMDS operates from the low flying, and smaller, helicopters. Surface mines are either moored (via a chain to the bottom) or floating (a favorite terrorist tactic), and many float just below the surface. The laser works very quickly, and enables the ALMDS equipped helicopter to quickly check out large areas for surface mines. Terrorists have used naval mines before, of the floating variety. Navies tend to use the more sophisticated, expensive and hard-to-get bottom mines (that lie on the bottom, in shallow water).

 

Many of these American mine detecting and clearing systems have had performance problems and work continues to make them more reliable and effective. American allies have also developed new mine detection and clearing tools and some of the new U.S. equipment uses foreign tech. While new mine designs have become more effective, the basic problem is that the many older mine designs are still very dangerous, especially for the unprepared.

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 16:55
« Faire preuve d’initiative et d’audace » - photo État-major des armées

« Faire preuve d’initiative et d’audace » - photo État-major des armées

 

06/11/2015 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Déterminé à faire progresser la cohérence entre les besoins des militaires engagés au combat et les moyens dont ils doivent disposer, le général d’armée Pierre de Villiers a réuni à Balard les industriels de la défense pour leur présenter un retour des expériences tirées des opérations en cours afin d’améliorer la réponse industrielle aux besoins des forces.

 

S’inscrivant dans une logique « gagnant-gagnant », le chef d’état-major des armées a fait part aux industriels de sa conviction « qu’il est toujours possible de mettre en œuvre des solutions innovantes et pragmatiques, dès lors que nous unissons nos volontés dans l’objectif commun de donner la primauté à l’opérationnel ». Conçu comme un « trilogue » Armées – DGA – Industrie, ce séminaire était co-présidé par M. Collet-Billon, délégué général pour l’armement.

 

« Faire preuve d’initiative et d’audace » - photo État-major des armées

« Faire preuve d’initiative et d’audace » - photo État-major des armées

Repère :

Le séminaire RETEX Armées – DGA – Industrie est organisé chaque année et rassemble, autour du CEMA, du DGA et des présidents directeurs généraux des principales entreprises de défense, les acteurs du débat capacitaire.

L’objectif du séminaire 2015 était de réfléchir ensemble à une meilleure prise en compte de l’environnement de mise en œuvre des équipements militaires (soutien logistique, maintien en condition opérationnelle, partages Etat-industrie, ressources humaines,…)

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7 novembre 2015 6 07 /11 /novembre /2015 12:55
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

 

06/11/2015 Sources : Marine nationale

 

Le mercredi 4 novembre 2015, l'amiral Rogel, accueilli par le vice-amiral Charles-Henri Garié, commandant du BMPM, a rendu visite au Bataillon de marins-pompiers de Marseille.

 

À cette occasion, le CEMM a salué cette unité hors normes, plus grande unité de la Marine nationale, dont la mission de sécurité civile consiste à protéger lors de ses 115.000 interventions annuelles, Marseille, ses habitants, son environnement et son port.

 

L’amiral Rogel s’est vu présenter un large panel des capacités d’interventions des marins du feu : lutte contre l’incendie, survie en mer, risques technologiques, experts cynotechniques, groupe d’intervention en milieu périlleux (GRIMP), mais aussi engins d’interventions contre les feux de forêts, de secours terrestres ou maritimes.

 

Cette visite était également l’occasion d’échanges et de discussions ouvertes avec les marins du bataillon. Au cours de ces échanges, le chef d’état-major de la Marine a rappelé «l’efficacité des marins pompiers, leur sens des responsabilités et l’humilité dont ils savent faire preuve pour venir en aide aux Marseillais avec humanité et conformément à l’esprit d’équipage qui les anime»

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 18:50
Transfer of Authority between General de Rousiers and General Kostarakos - photo EUMC

Transfer of Authority between General de Rousiers and General Kostarakos - photo EUMC

 

06/11/2015 Press release 781/15

 

Today General Mikhail Kostarakos, who previously served as the Chief of the Hellenic National Defence General Staff, assumed his duties for a period of three years. 

The Council appointed General Kostarakos as next Chairman of the EU Military Committee on 15 December 2014. 

The Chairman leads the EU Military Committee, the highest military body within the Council of the EU. 

He is the military adviser to the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and the primary point of contact for the Commanders of the EU's military operations and missions. 

General Mikhail Kostarakos succeeds General Patrick de Rousiers, who has been in the position from 6 November 2012 to 5 November 2015.

 

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:50
Swedish Air Force Gripen fighter aircraft - photo Saab

Swedish Air Force Gripen fighter aircraft - photo Saab

 

Nov 6, 2015 ASDNews Source : Saab AB

 

Defence and security company Saab has received an order from the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) to provide support and maintenance for Gripen during 2016 on behalf of the Swedish Armed Forces. The contract value is SEK154 million.In 2012 Saab signed a contract with FMV for performance-based support and maintenance of the Gripen fighter.

This latest order for services in 2016 is confirmation of an option held under that 2012 contract. The order includes support and maintenance operations with a focus on technical support, publications and component maintenance to support the continued operation of Gripen.

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:35
Artillery: South Korea Does What The Americans Cannot

 

November 3, 2015: Strategy Page

 

South Korea recently sold a hundred of its locally designed and made K9 155mm self-propelled howitzers to India for about $7.5 million each. South Korea has already sold 350 K9s to Turkey and 120 to Poland. While superficially similar to the American M109 the K9 is a heaver (46 tons versus 28 for the M109), carries more ammo and has twice the range (up to 56 kilometers in part because of a barrel that is a third longer). There is more automation on the K9, so it has a crew of five versus six on the M-109. South Korea thus joins Germany in their effort to build a suitable replacement for the elderly M109 design. To get the Indian sale South Korea had to agree to have the K9s assembled in India from South Korean components. This sale gives South Korea an edge in obtaining an even larger contract to supply India with several thousand towed 155mm howitzers. Because of corruption and political problems the Indian Army has not been able to buy any new artillery since the 1980s. The chief competitor for the Indian contract was Russia which offered its similar 42 ton 2S19. The K-9 won on the basis of technical capabilities, field tests and a South Korean reputation for quality and reliability.

 

The K9 and 2S19 are examples of the kind of system the United States sought to build to replace its 1960s era M109. The United States sought to build the 56 ton Crusader to replace the M109s. Crusader was very similar to the K9 but was too complex and expensive and the heavier weight was seen as a disadvantage for a country that has to ship its armored vehicles overseas to use them. For South Korea, Turkey and Poland that is not a problem and more heft (and protection for the crew) is an advantage.

 

One American innovation K9 users will probably adopt is the GPS guided Excalibur shell. This smart shell entered service in 2008 and changed everything. Excalibur has worked very well in combat, and this is radically changing the way artillery operates. Excalibur means 80-90 percent less ammo has to be fired to destroy a target and this results in less wear and tear on SP artillery, less time needed for maintenance, and less time spent replenishing ammo supplies and more time being ready for action.

 

Because of Excalibur (and other precision munitions) since 2001 operations in Iraq and Afghanistan provided very little work for the M109. The lighter, towed, M777 has proved more useful, especially when using the Excalibur shell. Currently, the army plans to keep newly upgraded versions of the M109 around until 2050. The army plans to acquire at least 551 upgraded M-109s by 2027, reflecting the impact of the Excalibur shell, and the number of older M109s that are still fit for service. The M109 was a solid design, which is pretty clear from how difficult it's been to come up with a replacement. So, in the end, the army replaced the M109 with another M109 upgrade and is still seeking a replacement for that.

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:30
F-15Cs Arrive at Incirlik Air Base

U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagles depart RAF Lakenheath to support the combat air patrol mission in Turkey, Nov. 6, 2015. The six F-15Cs from the 48th Fighter Wing deployed to Incirlik in response to the Government of Turkey's request for support in securing the sovereignty of Turkish airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Erin Babbis/Released)

 

6 November 2015 U.S. European Command (EUCOM)

 

STUTTGART, Germany – In a demonstration of our unwavering support for Turkish sovereignty and the collective security of the region, U.S. European Command has directed the U.S. Air Force to deploy six F-15s to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

 

The F-15Cs from the 48th Fighter Wing based at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, arrived at approximately 3:30 p.m. Eastern European Time (EET).These aircraft will conduct combat air patrols in Turkish air space.

 

This deployment of additional aircraft to Incirlik is in response to the Government of Turkey's request for support in securing the sovereignty of Turkish airspace. Turkey and the U.S. are long-time NATO Allies and the U.S. Air Force has a long history of working closely with Turkey. We are guests of the Government of Turkey at Incirlik Air Base, and there are no plans for a more permanent U.S. presence at this location.

 

We will continue to work closely with our Turkish partners on supporting the sovereignty of Turkish airspace and our shared efforts to degrade and destroy ISIL. The U.S. and Turkey, as NATO allies, share a commitment to peace and stability in the region.

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:30
Electronic Weapons: Transparent Armor

 

November 3, 2015: Strategy Page

 

Israel and the United States have developed a new VR (Virtual Reality) feature that enables pilots and armored vehicle crew to look through any part of the aircraft or vehicle to see what is outside. This was first applied to the "look and shoot" helmet displays used by F-35, F-15, F-16, Eurofighter Typhoon and F-18 pilots. F-35s are getting the latest model (the U.S.–Israeli HMDS, Helmet-Mounted Display System) of these smart helmets and that will include the new VR feature. These new helmets can display graphics in real time and the VR feature enables the helmet display to show what is beneath the aircraft (via cameras on the fuselage beneath the cockpit) when the pilot looks down with this VR feature turned on. This can be very useful in combat, ground attack or simply landing. This feature proved particularly effective when operating at night. HMDS is also closely integrated with the very capable F-35 avionics and thus will enable to the F-35 to be the first modern jet without a standard HUD (mounted above the cockpit instruments in front of the pilot).

 

The ground vehicle version takes advantage of the fact that a growing number of vehicles have numerous day/night vision vidcams mounted on the outside. These allow the crew to look at a display and switch between different cameras. That can take time. Even if it’s only a few seconds that can be too long in combat. Thus some or all the people in the vehicle can be equipped with a monocle or goggles that use the VR feature. The monocle is useful if the VR system in the vehicle does not have the data display feature. This is standard in modern pilot helmet visors. This VR capability is believed to be more useful for crews of armored vehicles where there is a lot more going on outside the vehicle that is the case with aircraft.

 

Other features the armored vehicle monocle or tablet will adapt from pilot helmets is the "look and shoot" helmet displays that include information displayed on the visor and sensors in the helmet. This enables the pilot to look at the target (either another aircraft, or something on the ground) and fire a weapon (missile) that will go after the target being looked at. Recent upgrades allow the pilot to also put "head up display" (HUD) information on the helmet visor visual system. This is a big advantage in air combat, where it's always been a problem having to look down at some display or instrument reading, and take your eyes off the surrounding air space. This makes it safer for pilots (especially when flying on the deck, at high speed) and in combat. Another recent enhancement allows each pilot to customize what information is shown on their helmet visor. A tank or IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) crew could use the same tech, especially for the remotely controlled weapons on the turret or even the main gun of a tank.

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:20
F-35: Italians First Mission Highlights Partnerships

An Italian F-35 Lightning II pilot is met by a 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit Airman Nov. 5, 2015, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., after the pilot flew the first Italian F-35 training mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Ridge Shan)

 

Nov 06, 2015 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: US Air Force 56th Fighter Wing; issued Nov 05, 2015)

 

LUKE AFB, Arizona --- Two Italian pilots completed their initial training flight in the F-35 Lightning II Nov. 5 at Luke Air Force Base marking the first F-35 flights under control of an Italian pilot.

Today marks another significant step forward for the F-35 program as today's missions showcased the full partnership aspect of F-35 operations here. One Italian flew his mission in an Australian F-35 with an Air Force Reserve ground instructor on the headset. In addition, the maintenance team was comprised of Lockheed Martin contractors and an Australian maintenance liaison officer.

Two U.S. instructor pilots from the 61st Fighter Squadron flew alongside the Italians, guiding them through their first flight.

"This has been a big day for the 61st, for Luke AFB, and for the F-35 program," said Lt Col Michael Gette, 61st Fighter Squadron commander. "Every aspect of today's operation was a multinational effort. It was a great example of how all the partner nations are cooperating to make this program a reality and shows how Luke AFB is becoming the international training hub for the F-35."

The international partnerships were on further display as two U.S. student pilots took their first flight as well, one guided by a U.S. instructor pilot and the other by an Australian.

"It is great from an Australian partner perspective to be contributing to the outcome of training F-35 aircrew," said Squadron Leader Nathan Draper, Australian Participant Maintenance Liaison Officer. "To see a USAF IP alongside an Aussie jet with an Italian partner getting his first flight is seeing the vision for the program come to fruition. It is a great day for the F-35 and a big milestone for our team."

The pilots began the academic training phase on Sept. 21, which involved approximately 90 days of classroom and simulator instruction under the supervision of the 56th Training Squadron prior to them stepping to the jet.

"New pilots will be trained in an environment where they learn how to work seamlessly with other nations both from a practical standpoint and a tactical basis," an Italian pilot said. "Future students coming through the course will be able to fly on many different tails, so it is a perfect integration."

When the Italian pilots return home they will be equipped to help develop the training programs of their own air forces and will help pioneer the next generation of global F-35 pilots.

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