Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 15:50
A French Army Gazelle and an Apache from the Army Air Corps [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, UK MoD]

A French Army Gazelle and an Apache from the Army Air Corps [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, UK MoD]

3 May 2013 Ministry of Defence

 

The working relationship between the British and French Army's attack helicopters has taken off during a major military exercise.

 

Apaches from the Army Air Corps and Gazelles from the French Army have forged an operational partnership during demanding training on Exercise Joint Warrior in the West Freugh area of Scotland.

The helicopters were taking part in joint training to prepare 16 Air Assault Brigade and the 11th Parachute Brigade, the British and French Army’s rapid reaction forces, respectively, to be able to deploy side-by-side on contingency operations ranging from disaster relief to war-fighting.

Two missions tested the ability of the attack helicopters to work together. Under British command, Apaches and Gazelles escorted helicopters carrying troops from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment. The attack helicopters then hit targets on the ground with cannon and missiles to clear the way for the infantry to assault a position.

Apache and Gazelle helicopters
Apache and Gazelle helicopters during a training mission on Exercise Joint Warrior [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, Crown copyright]

A similar escort mission under French leadership saw targets identified and marked by Gazelles for the Apaches to strike, and vice-versa.

Gazelle pilot Captain Pierre-Alain Goujard said:

To be appointed as the air mission commander for such a huge air assault was both an honour and a challenge. How would we deal with target handovers, troop-lifts and relief in place all at once?

But what could have seemed either over-ambitious or tentative proved to be efficient. Our procedures are near identical, our aircraft have complementary capabilities and, last but not least, language hasn’t been a factor.

This training has shown that joint working between French and British attack helicopters is a hard fact, not just politics.

An Apache and a Gazelle helicopter
An Apache from the Army Air Corps and a French Army Gazelle in action [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, Crown copyright]

The Apaches were flown and maintained by soldiers from 656 Squadron, 4 Regiment Army Air Corps, which is based at Wattisham in Suffolk.

Officer Commanding 656 Squadron, Major Piers Lewis, said:

This is the first time we have worked alongside French Gazelles and we’ve really taken forward the integration of our aviation forces. To fly side-by-side on missions and exchange targets between us on our first attempt at joint operations is a fantastic achievement.

There’s a natural affinity between pilots and we speak the same vocabulary in the air, which has really enabled us to work together fluently. This exercise has put us in a good place if we are called on to do a joint operation.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 15:50
NATO Sec-Gen Again Warns Europe on Defense Cuts

May 7, 2013 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: US Department of Defense; issued May 6, 2013)

 

WASHINGTON --- NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen warned today that further cuts in defense spending by European nations risk reducing the continent’s defense and security to “hot air,” turning the alliance into what he called a “global spectator” rather than a real force on the world stage.

 

“The only way to avoid this is by holding the line on defense spending and to start reinvesting in security as soon as our economies recover,” he told a meeting in Brussels of the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs.

 

Rasmussen said European nations should not become absorbed by their own domestic issues, including sluggish economies that have contributed to defense cuts, and instead develop a “truly global perspective” to respond to crises further away from home.

 

“Having the right capabilities is important, but it is not enough,” he said. “We must also have the political will to use them, to deal with security challenges on Europe’s doorstep, to help manage crises further away that might affect us here at home, and to better share the security burden with our North American allies.”

 

Meanwhile, he said, European nations need to make better use of what they have – “to do more together as Europeans – within the European Union and within NATO - to deliver the critical defense capabilities that are too expensive for any individual country to deliver alone.”

 

It was the latest in a series of warnings over the past several years by Rasmussen that further cuts by European governments in defense spending could put NATO’s viability at risk. In 2011, Rasmussen said the trend suggested the continent was headed toward getting out of the security business entirely, pointing out that European nations had cut their defense budgets by $45 billion - the equivalent of Germany’s entire annual defense budget - while U.S contributions to NATO had increased from about half of total alliance spending to close to 75 percent.

 

Those comments were followed by a blunt warning from then-U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who said NATO risked “irrelevance” and a “dismal future” if alliance members were not seen as “serious and capable partners in their own defense.”

 

Today, Rasmussen said soft power alone really is no power at all.

 

“Without hard capabilities to back up its diplomacy, Europe will lack credibility and influence,” he added. “It will risk being a global spectator, rather than the powerful global actor that it can be and should be.” (ends)

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 15:50
Italian Army's first FOC configuration helicopter stationed at AugustaWestland's facility in Venice Tessera, Italy. Photo AgustaWestland - A Finmeccanica Company.

Italian Army's first FOC configuration helicopter stationed at AugustaWestland's facility in Venice Tessera, Italy. Photo AgustaWestland - A Finmeccanica Company.

 

 

7 May 2013 army-technology.com

 

The Italian Army has taken delivery of the first final operational capability (FOC) configuration NH90 tactical transport helicopter (TTH) during an official ceremony at AgustaWestland's NH90 final assembly line in Venice Tessera, Italy.

 

Representing a significant milestone for the Italian Army's NH90 programme, the shipment brings the total number of helicopters received by the service to date to 21.

 

Around 60 NH90 TTHs were ordered by the Italian Defence Ministry for the army, along with 46 Nato frigate helicopter (NFH), as well as ten TTH for the Navy from NH Industries in June 2000.

 

Currently deployed in Afghanistan, five Italian NH90s have successfully completed 470 flight hours with enhanced performance, reliability and mission effectiveness in the country's extreme and demanding environmental, weather and operational conditions.

 

Powered by two Rolls-Royce-Turbomeca RTM322 engines, the NH90 TTH is a multi-role military helicopter primarily designed to conduct logistics and utility transport, combat search-and-rescue (RESCO), as well as heliborne operations during day and night.

 

The 11t-class, fully composite crashworthy fuselage equipped helicopter can also be configured for casualty and medical evacuation, electronic warfare, special operations and counter-terrorism operations, airborne command post and VIP transportation missions.

 

Additional features include a dual bus core avionic system, full glass cockpit with multi-function displays, fly-by-wire controls with a four-axis automatic flight control system, as well as up to two M134D mini guns for enhanced self-defence capabilities.

 

The helicopters have also been ordered by other NH90 members, including Australia, Belgium, Greece, Norway, New-Zealand, Oman, Sweden, Spain, Finland, France, Portugal, and the Netherlands.

 

AgustaWestland is also providing an integrated operational support package to help the Italian army maximise operational effectiveness of its NH90 fleet, as part of a phased logistic support (PLS) programme from the Venice Tessera facility.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 14:35
photo Livefist

photo Livefist

May 7, 2013 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: Express News Service; published May 7, 2013)

 

Impossible to Set Time Frame for MMRCA Deal: Antony

 

NEW DELHI --- Union Defence Minister A K Antony on Monday said it was not possible to set a time frame for signing the much-awaited deal for the Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) with French company Dassault Aviation.

 

The contract, said to be worth nearly Rs 1 lakh crore, is still at the negotiation stage, a year-and-a-half after the French firm emerged as the lowest bidder in the tender which was floated in August 2007.

 

“Given the complexity of the proposal, no definite time frame can be fixed at this stage (for signing the deal),” Antony said in a written reply in Parliament.

 

“The proposal for procurement of the 126 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft is currently at the stage of commercial discussions with the L1 vendor, Dassault Aviation and hence the terms and conditions for purchase including the delivery schedule are yet to be finalised,” he said.

 

However, the Defence Minister pointed out that the Request for Proposal–defence parlance for a commercial tender – stipulated that the delivery of the 18 flyaway aircraft should take place between the third and fourth years after the signing of the contract. The manufacturing of the remaining 108 fighters under licence from Dassault will take place here from the 4th to the 11th year after the signing of the contract.

 

Dassault has offered its Rafale combat planes to India under the Request for Proposal and it had beaten the European consortium EADS Cassidian, which had offered its Eurofighter Typhoon plane, in the last stage of the tendering process in January 2012. The two firms had been down-selected by the Indian Air Force after intense flight and weapons trials in which the US aircraft – Lockheed Martin’s F-16 and Boeing’s F/A-18 – Russian United Aircraft Corporation’s MiG-35 and Swedish Saab’s Gripen were eliminated from the competition in April 2011.

 

Meanwhile, the Army is planning to procure 100 self-propelled artillery howitzers and three Indian vendors, including two private companies, have been selected for trial of their equipment, A K Antony told the Lok Sabha on Monday.

 

In a written reply to the lower house of Parliament, the Defence Ministry also said the recent amendment to Defence Procurement Procedure-2011 aims at giving higher preference to indigenous capacity in the defence sector.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 14:20

May 7, 2013 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: NATO; issued May 6, 2013)

 

Addressing the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs and Subcommittee on Security and Defence, plus chairpersons of defence and foreign affairs committees of national parliaments, on 6 May, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen called for the December European Council on security and defence to “showcase a Europe that is both able and willing to act,” and to encourage the EU and NATO to do more together.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:55
Denis Pinoteau, directeur commercial export véhicules légers à roues de Nexter

29/04/2013 Par Bénédicte GOUTTEBROZE

 

Denis Pinoteau est nommé directeur commercial export véhicules légers à roues de Nexter, groupe industriel spécialisé dans l'armement appartenant à l'État français. Il est sous la responsabilité directe de Jean-Christophe Bund, deputy director sales & marketing.

 

Diplômé de Saint-Cyr en 1991 et titulaire d'un executive MBA obtenu à HEC Paris en 2005, Denis Pinoteau était précédemment responsable commercial export Inde et Moyen-Orient chez Sagem, depuis 2006.

 

Nexter fabrique du matériel militaire pour le combat terrestre, aéroterrestre, aéronaval et naval.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:55
credits DGA Com

credits DGA Com

01 mai 2013 Par Elodie Vallerey - Usinenouvelle.com

 

Pour le PDG de Dassault Aviation, la possible organisation d’élections générales anticipées en Inde ne constitue pas une menace pour l’avancement des négociations exclusives entre l’avionneur français et le gouvernement de New Delhi.

Dans sa course de fond pour convaincre l’Inde d’acheter 126 exemplaires de son avion de combat omnirôle Rafale, Dassault Aviation entre dans une phase cruciale. Celle de l’endurance longue, comme l’appellent les marathoniens. Les négociations, même exclusives entre New Delhi et l’avionneur de Saint-Cloud, prennent depuis quelques semaines un goût plus âpre.

De l’aveu d’Eric Trappier, le PDG de Dassault Aviation, les discussions sont récemment devenues plus lourdes entre Paris et New Delhi. Le nœud du problème ? L’implementation en Inde de l’assemblage du chasseur.

Une vingtaine de salariés de Dassault mobilisés en Inde

 

On le sait, le groupe aéronautique public Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) exige l’assemblage sur le sol indien de 108 appareils sur les 126 prévus par le deal. Les indispensables transferts de technologie entre Dassault et l’industriel local sont encore en cours de négociation.

Et, avec eux, la question du partage des responsabilités concernant les Rafale assemblés par HAL. Dassault Aviation n’entend pas assumer la responsabilité de ces appareils, alors que l’indien exige pour sa part des garanties. Après une entente sur le transfert de technologies, ce point constitue aujourd’hui le tropisme des discussions franco-indiennes.

Pour parvenir à signer ce contrat historique, Dassault Aviation est en ordre de bataille. Vingt à trente salariés opérationnels de l’avionneur sont mobilisés en Inde, multipliant les allers et retours entre Paris et New Delhi, jouant les émissaires auprès des commissions concernées, négociant chaque détail avec HAL.

En marge des festivités organisées par Dassault pour le cinquantenaire de sa famille de jets d'affaires Falcon, Eric Trappier l’a assuré, des élections générales anticipées ne changeraient pas la donne à ce stade des négociations. Côté indien, les médias et commentateurs ne cessent pourtant de rappeler que si elles sont avancées à novembre prochain au lieu du printemps 2014, les négociations avec Dassault pourraient être encore prolongées. Sans parler d'une remise en cause pure et simple de l'appel d'offres remporté par l'industriel français en cas de victoire d'une nouvelle majorité politique.

Arrivé deuxième lors de la compétition MRCA pour l'équipement de l'armée de l'air indienne, le chasseur multirôle Eurofighter Typhoon du consortium BAE-EADS-Alenia reste en embuscade en cas de faux-pas de son concurrent français.

La signature du contrat avec l'Inde est devenue capitale pour Dassault Aviation, qui peine à écouler son chasseur à l'export. Et même en France, les réductions successives des budgets militaires imposent une stagnation des commandes de Rafale. Dans son Livre blanc sur la défense et la sécurité nationale dévoilé le 29 avril, l'exécutif évoque "225 avions de combat (air et marine)" dans son modèle d'armée, suggérant que le ministère de la Défense ne débloquera pas de crédits pour aller au-delà des 180 Rafale déjà commandés à Dassault.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:45
source leaders.com.tn

source leaders.com.tn

May 7, 2013: Strategy Page

 

In Tunisia a group of fifty or more Islamic terrorists are operating in the Mount Chaambi region near the Algerian border (close to the Kasserine Pass through the Atlas Mountains that stretch across most of the North African coast ). Soldiers and police are searching a hundred square kilometers of sparsely populated forests and mountains without much success. The searchers have found evidence that there is someone up there, but the group has so far managed to avoid detection. This is the first time Tunisia has had to deal with armed Islamic terrorists since 2007.

 

These armed men have been active in the area for at least six months. Soldiers sent to the area have suffered about twenty casualties from booby-traps and handmade landmines left around by the terrorists. A camp found near the top of Mount Chaambi and it contained documents, weapons and equipment indicating the size and origin of the group. This group appears to be well supplied and seems to have enough cash to keep themselves going for a while. Some of these men have recently fled Mali and others are from Algeria. These were joined by a smaller group (a dozen or so) of Tunisian Islamic terrorists who had apparently not been active until joined by all these new men and a few local recruits. Eleven of the 32 terrorists killed nearby in an attack on an Algerian natural gas field in January were Tunisian which provided a hint that there were a lot more Islamic terrorists in Tunisia than the government wanted to admit.

 

There has been one gun battle near Mount Chaambi so far, in which no one was hurt. Police have arrested twenty suspects in the region, but none of these appear to have much knowledge of the Islamic terrorists in the mountains. There appear to be at least two separate armed groups and police are blocking the few roads in the area to try and prevent the terrorists from moving to another part of the country.

 

Tunisia was the first country to carry out an Arab Spring uprising and a new government was installed two years ago. Islamic radicals were released from jail and allowed to operate in the open as long as they did not turn to terrorism or anything illegal inside Tunisia. These radicals have tried, so far without success, to get the new government to establish a religious dictatorship that would enforce Islamic (Sharia) law.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:45
source beegeagle

source beegeagle

7 May 2013 BBC Africa

 

A Nigerian warplane involved in operations against militant Islamists in Mali has crashed in Niger, killing two pilots, the army has said.

 

These are the first casualties Nigeria has suffered after deploying troops in January to fight the militants.

 

Mechanical failure was likely to have caused the fighter jet to crash near Mali's border while it was on a non-combat mission, reports say.

 

International forces uses Niger as an airbase for operations in Mali.

 

France has started to withdraw some of its 4,500 troops from Mali, hoping that African forces will take over the campaign to fight the militants.

 

'Routine flight'

 

The UN Security Council passed a resolution in April to incorporate the 6,000-strong African force in Mali into a UN force numbering 11,200.

 

Chad and Nigeria form the bulk of the African troops in Mali.

 

Nigerian Air Force spokesman Commodore Yusuf Anas told Reuters news agency that an investigation was underway to establish the cause of the crash.

 

"They were on a normal routine flight about 60km (37 miles) west of Niamey when something happened," he told Reuters.

 

Army sources in Niger ruled out the possibility that the jet had been shot at, saying it was not in "enemy territory".

 

French and African troops have driven the militants out of northern cities and towns in Mali - including Timbuktu and Gao - since combat operations started in January.

 

But some fighters have retreated to desert hideouts in the vast region, from where they launch isolated attacks against French and Malian forces.

 

The al-Qaeda-linked militants took advantage of a coup in Mali in March 2012 to extend their control across the north of Mali.

 

France intervened, saying Mali could become a "terrorist state" that threatened global security.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:35
India Prepares For Another Chinese Victory

May 7, 2013: Strategy page

 

The recent (April 15th) Chinese incursion inside Indian Kashmir has reminded Indian military leaders that despite over five years of brave talk and bold plans not much has actually been accomplished to rectify the shortage of access to the Indian side of the border. It was this lack of access that played a key role in the last border war with China (in 1962) which saw better prepared and supplied Chinese forces wearing down their brave but ill-supplied Indian opponents. Indians are waking up to the fact that a repeat of their 1962 defeat is in the making.

 

Over the last five years India has ordered roads built so that troops can reach the Chinese border in sufficient strength to stop a Chinese invasion. The roads have, for the most part, not been built. The problem is the Indian bureaucracy and its inability to get anything done quickly, or even on time. The military procurement bureaucracy is the best, or worst example of this. The military procurement bureaucracy takes decades to develop and produce locally made gear and often never delivers. Buying foreign equipment is almost as bad, with corruption and indecisiveness delaying, and sometimes halting selection and purchase of needed items.

 

Despite the bureaucracy some progress has been made. Three years ago India quietly built and put into service an airfield for transports in the north (Uttarakhand) near their border with China. While the airfield can also be used to bring in urgently needed supplies for local civilians during those months when snow blocks the few roads, it is mainly there for military purposes in case China invades again. Uttarakhand is near Kashmir and a 38,000 square kilometer chunk of land that China seized after a brief war with India in 1962. This airfield and several similar projects along the Chinese border are all about growing fears of continued Chinese claims on Indian territory. India is alarmed at increasing strident Chinese insistence that is owns northeastern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. This has led to an increased movement of Indian military forces to that remote area.

 

India has discovered that a buildup in these remote areas is easier said than done. Without new roads nothing else really makes much difference. Airfields require fuel and other supplies to be more than just another place where an aircraft can land (and not take off if it needs refueling). Moreover, the Indians found that they were far behind Chinese efforts. When they took a closer look three years ago, Indian staff officers discovered that China had improved its road network along most of their 4,000 kilometer common border. Indian military planners calculated that, as a result of this network, Chinese military units could move 400 kilometers a day on hard surfaced roads, while Indian units could only move half as fast, while suffering more vehicle damage because of the many unpaved roads. Moreover China had more roads right up to the border. Building more roads on the Indian side will take years, once the bureaucratic problems are overcome (which often takes a decade). The roads are essential to support Indian plans to build more airfields near the border and stationing modern fighters there. Military planners found, once the terrain was surveyed and calculations completed, that it would take a lot more time because of the need to build maintenance facilities, roads to move in fuel and supplies, and housing for military families.

 

All these border disputes have been around for centuries but became more immediate when India and China fought a short war, up in these mountains, in 1962. The Indians lost and are determined not to lose a rematch. But so far, the Indians have been falling farther behind China. This situation developed because India, decades ago, decided that one way to deal with a Chinese invasion was to make it difficult for them to move forward. Thus, for decades, the Indians built few roads on their side of the border. But that also made it more difficult for Indian forces to get into the disputed areas. This strategy suited the Indian inability to actually build roads in these sparsely inhabited areas.

 

The source of the current border tension goes back a century and heated up when China resumed its control over Tibet in the 1950s. From the end of the Chinese empire in 1912 up until 1949 Tibet had been independent. But when the communists took over China in 1949, they sought to reassert control over their "lost province" of Tibet. This began slowly, but once all of Tibet was under Chinese control in 1959, China once again had a border with India and there was immediately a disagreement about exactly where the border should be. That’s because, in 1914, the newly independent government of Tibet worked out a border (the McMahon line) with the British (who controlled India). China considers this border agreement illegal and wants 90,000 square kilometers back. India refused, especially since this would mean losing much of the state of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India and some bits elsewhere in the area.

 

Putting more roads into places like Arunachal Pradesh (83,000 square kilometers and only a million people) and Uttarakhand (53,566 square kilometers and ten million people) will improve the economy, as well as military capabilities. This will be true of most of the border area. For decades local civilians along these borders have been asking for more roads and economic development, but were turned down because of the now discredited Indian strategy.

 

All the roads won't change the fact that most of the border is mountains, the highest mountains (the Himalayas) in the world. So no matter how much you prepare for war, no one is going very far, very fast, when you have to deal with these mountains. As the Indians discovered, the Chinese persevered anyway and built roads and railroads anyway and now India has to quickly respond in kind or face a repeat of their 1962 defeat.

 

Despite the lack of roads India has moved several infantry divisions, several squadrons of Su-30 fighters, and six of the first eight squadrons of its new Akash air defense missile systems as close to the Chinese border as their existing road network will allow. Most of these initially went into Assam, just south of Arunachal Pradesh, until the road network is built up sufficiently to allow bases to be maintained closer to the border. It may be a decade or more before those roads are built, meaning China can seize Arunachal Pradesh anytime it wants and there’s not much India can do to stop it.

 

Undeterred by that the Indian Army has asked for $3.5 billion in order to create three more brigades (two infantry and one armored) to defend the Chinese border. Actually, this new force is in addition to the new mountain corps (of 80,000 troops) nearing approval (at a cost of $11.5 billion). The mountain corps is to be complete in four years. The three proposed brigades would be ready in 4-5 years. By the end of the decade India will have spent nearly five billion dollars on new roads, rail lines, and air fields near the 4,057 kilometer long Chinese border. Spending the money is not the same as actually getting the roads and railroads actually built.

 

All this is another example of the old saying that amateurs (and politicians) talk tactics, while professionals talk logistics. China realized this first and has built 58,000 kilometers of roads to the Indian border, along with five airbases and several rail lines. Thus China can move thirty divisions to the border, which is three times more than India can get to its side of the frontier.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:35
China Armed Forces source Defence Talk

China Armed Forces source Defence Talk

May 7, 2013: Strategy Page

 

For the first time China has published data on the exact size of its military services. The army has a personnel strength of 850,000, the navy has 235,000 and the air force 398,000 (including three airborne divisions, air defense units and the strategic missiles in the Second Artillery Force).

 

The Chinese also released the identification of the major army units assigned to each of the seven MACs (Military Area Command): Shenyang (16th, 39th and 40th Combined Corps), Beijing (27th, 38th and 65th Combined Corps), Lanzhou (21st and 47th Combined Corps), Jinan (20th, 26th and 54th Combined Corps), Nanjing (1st, 12th and 31st Combined Corps), Guangzhou (41st and 42nd Combined Corps) and Chengdu (13th and 14th Combined Corps).  Each Combined Corps contains two or more divisions plus independent brigades. In peacetime these units are used to back up the police in maintaining public order and standing ready to help when there is a natural disaster. Some units with better equipment and training are designated as available to quickly go to some border area to deal with an enemy threat.

 

These revelations are part of a program to modernize the armed forces. Most of this information was already available via open sources and Internet chatter in China. There have been some similar public relations efforts. Over the last three years, without any fanfare, China has changed the names of its armed forces. Gone is the PLA (Peoples Liberation Army) prefix for the navy (PLAN) and air force (PLAAF). It's now just the Chinese Army, Chinese Navy, and Chinese Air Force. There are also the Marines of the Chinese Navy. These changes can be seen on patches worn by Chinese troops operating overseas. These badges show the symbol representing the service, the name in Chinese and also in English (the international language, especially in Asia).

 

Since there was no official announcement, there was no explanation for why the old PLA prefix was dropped. The PLA was the original Chinese Communist armed forces, founded in 1927 by the Chinese Communist Party. This force was initially known as the Chinese Red Army. After World War II the PLA name was formally adopted for all the communist armed forces.

 

Because of this Communist Party connection, and continuing Chinese efforts to merge with Taiwan (the last territory held by the non-communist groups that lost the civil war in 1948 and took refuge on Taiwan), it is believed the "Peoples Liberation" prefix was discarded to please the "democratic" (as opposed to "communist") Chinese on Taiwan, as well as all those non-communist neighbors.

 

For the last two decades China has been working to modernize its armed forces and eliminating petty (and ineffective) secrecy and name changes appears to be a minor, but important, part of that.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:25
"Etranges Affaires" enquête sur les missiles Exocet dans la guerre des Malouines

07.05.2013 par P. CHAPLEAU Lignes de Défense

 

Le deuxième numéro de la série documentaires "Etranges Affaires" est en cours de post-production et sera diffusé sur France 3 en juillet. Il est consacré à l'affaire des Exocet français aux mains des Argentins, lors de la guerre des Malouines.

 

Le 4 mai 1982, un missile Exocet lancé par un Super Etendard de l’aéronavale argentine coule un destroyer de la Royal Navy venue reconquérir les îles Malouines. Le couple Super Etendard-Exocet, fabriqué par les Français, va être l'objet d'une guerre secrète entre Britanniques et Argentins.

 

Comme le précédent numéro de la série consacré à l'affaire des Vedettes de Cherbourg, le deuxième épisode d'"Etranges Affaires" est un documentaire hybride de 52 minutes qui associe archives, témoignages et animation. L'enquête est menée par Sasha Maréchal (interprétée par la comédienne Ina Mihalache) et Patrick Pesnot (dans son propre rôle). Les témoins clés en Argentine, au Royaume-Uni et en France décryptent le rôle des armes françaises pendant la guerre des Malouines. De l'attaque du destroyer Sheffield à l'opération Plum-Duff menée par les forces spéciales britanniques, le film propose un regard inédit sur cette affaire qui agita les relations entre Margaret Thatcher et François Mitterrand.

 

Ce deuxième opus d'"Etranges Affaires" est une coproduction Vivement Lundi !/Antoine Martin Productions avec la participation de l'unité documentaire de France 3, en association avec France 3 Nord-Ouest.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 12:25
Why Super Tucano Is Super

May 7, 2013: Strategy Page

 

Guatemala is buying six Brazilian A-29 Super Tucano aircraft for their air force. The Super Tucano is a single engine turbo-prop trainer/attack aircraft that is used by over a dozen nations. This aircraft carries two internal 12.7mm (.50 caliber) machine-guns and can carry up to 1.5 tons of bombs and rockets. It can stay in the air for 6.5 hours at a time. It is rugged, easy to maintain, and cheap. You pay $15-20 million for each Super Tucano, depending on how much training, spare parts and support equipment you get with them.

 

This aircraft can be equipped to carry over a half dozen of the 250 pound GPS smart bombs (or half a dozen dumb 500 pound bombs), giving it considerable potential firepower if rigged to handle smart bombs. The Super Tucano comes equipped with a GPS guidance system. Max altitude is 11,300 meters (35,000 feet) and cruising speed is 400 kilometers an hour. Naturally, this aircraft can move in lower and slower than any jet can. The Super Tucano is also equipped with armor for the pilot, a pressurized cockpit, and an ejection seat. Not bad for an aircraft with a max takeoff weight of 5.4 tons.

 

The Super Tucano can double as trainers. It's easier to train pilots to use the Super Tucano, cheaper to buy them, and much cheaper to operate them. It costs less than a tenth as much per flying hour to operate a Super Tucano compared to a F-16.

 

Guatemala is the sixth South Latin American customer for the Super Tucano joining Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, and Ecuador. Twelve countries (including Afghanistan, Angola, Burkina Fasso, Indonesia, Mauritius and Senegal) have bought Super Tucano, which has become the world’s leading counter-insurgency aircraft. Guatemala will use it to help control the growing problem with drug smugglers moving cocaine to North America.

 

These "trainer/light attack aircraft" can also operate from crude airports, or even a stretch of highway. Aircraft like this can carry systems to defeat portable surface to air missiles. They can carry smart bombs as well.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:54
photo EMA

photo EMA

07 mai 2013 Romandie.com (AFP)

 

DUBAI - Un chef d'Al-Qaïda au Maghreb Islamique (Aqmi) a appelé à attaquer les intérêts français partout dans le monde, dans une vidéo mise en ligne mardi.

 

Dénonçant la croisade menée par la France contre les musulmans au Mali, Abou Obeida Youssef Al-Annabi exhorte les musulmans dans le monde entier à attaquer les intérêts français partout, car ce sont des cibles légitimes.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:45
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

07/05/2013 Sources : EMA

 

Le 29 avril 2013, lors de son escale à Djibouti, l’équipage de la frégate de surveillance (FS) Nivôse, engagée dans l’opération de lutte contre la piraterie Atalante, a mené une action de formation au profit des garde-côtes djiboutiens en soutien de la mission civile européenne EUCAP Nestor.

 

Lancée par l’Union européenne en 2012, EUCAP Nestor a pour but d’assister et de conseiller l’ensemble des pays de la région, notamment la république de Djibouti sur des problématiques juridiques, stratégiques et opérationnelles en matière de piraterie.

 

L’action de coopération menée par les marins du Nivôse avait pour objectif de participer au renforcement des capacités maritimes côtières du pays (Local Maritime Capability Building – LMCB). Dans un premier temps, une présentation générale d’une opération de visite à bord d’un navire suspecté de piraterie a été présentée aux cinq stagiaires djiboutiens. Dans un deuxième temps, les différentes étapes d’une visite de navire ont été mises en pratique : prise en compte d’un équipage, progression à bord d’un navire et sécurisation d’un local.

photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

Placé sous le signe de la coopération entre les autorités européennes et djiboutiennes, cet entrainement a réaffirmé de manière concrète l’engagement de la république de Djibouti, dans son combat contre la piraterie.

 

Les bâtiments français engagés dans l’opération Atalante effectuent régulièrement des actions de formation dans le cadre de la mission EUCAP Nestor. Ainsi,  le 26 avril dernier, le bâtiment de projection et de commandement (BPC) Tonnerre, en escale à Port Victoria aux Seychelles, a participé à un entraînement de lutte contre la piraterie avec le patrouilleur des garde-côtes seychellois Topaz.

 

La frégate de surveillance Nivôse est engagée depuis le 10 avril 2012 dans l’opération européenne Atalante de lutte contre la piraterie aux côtés du bâtiment de projection et de commandement (BPC) Tonnerre et de la frégate anti-sous-marine (FASM) Georges Leygues qui forment le groupe Jeanne d’Arc.

 

 L’opération Atalante a pour mission d’escorter les navires du Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM), de participer à la sécurité du trafic maritime et de contribuer à la dissuasion, à la prévention et à la répression des actes de piraterie au large des côtes somaliennes. La France participe à l’opération Atalante avec le déploiement permanent d’au moins un bâtiment de la marine nationale.

 

Le dispositif peut être renforcé ponctuellement d’un avion de patrouille maritime, le plus souvent un Atlantique 2 (ATL 2), d’un Falcon 50 ou d’un Awacs.

 

L’opération Atalante et la mission EUCAP Nestor s’inscrivent dans une approche globale visant à apporter des solutions pérennes et sur le long terme pour améliorer la situation dans la zone et en Somalie.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:30
Jordanie : visite d’ALINDIEN

07/05/2013 Sources : EMA

 

Le 23 avril 2013, le vice-amiral Marin Gillier, commandant la zone maritime de l’Océan Indien (ALINDIEN), s’est rendu pour la deuxième fois sur le camp de Za’taari, en Jordanie, pour y rencontrer les militaires déployés dans le cadre de l’opération Tamour.

 

Lors de sa venue, l’amiral a rencontré les 80 militaires issus des trois armées et du  service de santé des armées (SSA) et visité les installations du groupement médical (GM), modifié pour pouvoir accueillir d’avantage de patients.

Jordanie : visite d’ALINDIEN

L’amiral Gillier s’est ensuite entretenu avec un certain nombre d’autorités sur place dont le général commandant la gendarmerie jordanienne de la zone Nord, le responsable du Haut-Commissariat des Réfugiés des Nations Unies (UNHCR) au camp de Za’taari, ainsi que les responsables de l’hôpital militaire marocain.

 

Enfin, il a effectué une visite du camp afin d’en apprécier les évolutions et  l’environnement.

Jordanie : visite d’ALINDIEN

En accord avec les autorités jordaniennes, la France a projeté en août 2012 un Groupement médico-chirurgical (GMC), aujourd’hui GM, sur le camp de Za’taari en Jordanie, afin d’apporter une aide médicale d’urgence aux victimes des combats en Syrie et un soutien sanitaire aux réfugiés. Au terme de sa mission, le GMC avait réalisé plus de 300 opérations chirurgicales.

 

Depuis mars 2013, avec l’évolution de la situation générale et des systèmes de coopération sur place, le groupement médical a adapté son offre de soins et se concentre sur le soutien médical dont les réfugiés présents sur le camp ont le plus besoin.

 

Parallèlement au GM, et depuis le 7 janvier 2013, une équipe mobile de vaccination a été mise en place, afin de s’adapter à la nouvelle situation générale du camp. Depuis août 2012, le personnel du SSA a procédé à près de 38 000 vaccinations et près de 9150 consultations médicales. Des médecins et infirmiers militaires arment le groupement médical tandis qu’un détachement de militaires français assure la force protection de nos installations.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:30
Syrie: la France s'alarme d'une extension régionale du conflit

07/05/2013 Par Alain Barluet – LeFigaro.fr

 

Après les raids israéliens sur Damas, les Occidentaux craignent que le conflit ne soit déjà en train de gagner les pays voisins, et s'interrogent de plus en plus sur la livraison d'armes à l'opposition syrienne.

 

Les raids israéliens sur Damas et la possible utilisation d'armes chimiques par les protagonistes syriens renforcent à Paris les craintes de voir le conflit faire tache d'huile dans la région. Une «préoccupation» largement partagée d'ailleurs, y compris par la Russie, qui a estimé lundi que les risques d'escalade dans la région étaient sérieux.

 

Mais les ouvertures font défaut pour débloquer une situation dont les paramètres n'ont fondamentalement pas évolué. «La situation en Syrie est une véritable tragédie» qui gagne les pays voisins, tels que la Jordanie ou le Liban, a déploré lundi Laurent Fabius, depuis Hongkong où il effectuait une visite. Avec des lignes de front peu ou prou stabilisées, des rebelles qui peinent à progresser en dépit de l'activisme de ses éléments djihadistes, la perspective d'une «solution politique» est la seule qui vaille. Le chef de la diplomatie française l'a souligné lundi, en rappelant qu'il souhaitait la formation d'un «gouvernement syrien transitoire». Une allusion à l'accord de Genève, seul texte signé sur la Syrie, le 30 juin 2012, par la communauté internationale, dont la Russie et la Chine. Il prévoit la formation d'un gouvernement de transition incluant des membres du régime de Damas.

 

Fin de l'embargo sur les armes

 

Les écueils sur cette voie n'ont toutefois pas varié. Ils tournent principalement autour du rôle dévolu à Bachar el-Assad. Insistant sur son interprétation du texte, la Russie continue d'appuyer son allié syrien et se refuse à pousser vers la sortie celui qui reste le maître de Damas. Autre difficulté, et non des moindres, les carences d'une opposition divisée et largement incapable de se structurer.

 

Vue de Paris, l'éventuelle livraison d'armes à la rébellion s'inscrit dans cette perspective: c'est surtout comme levier politique que la diplomatie française maintient en suspens cette question. Certes, on pointe à Paris un déséquilibre militaire patent au détriment des rebelles, dans la mesure où «la Russie continue de fournir du matériel à Damas». Et l'on se prend à croire qu'une rébellion militairement renforcée exercerait une pression politique sur le régime qui l'inciterait à négocier… À Paris, on laisse donc planer la perspective d'une aide militaire à l'opposition. Même si François Hollande a donné un sérieux coup de frein en jugeant, fin mars sur France 2, que la situation était trop incertaine pour armer la rébellion.

 

L'heure des choix approche. Les chefs de la diplomatie des Vingt-Sept doivent se retrouver le 27 mai, quatre jours avant la fin des sanctions européennes instaurées contre Damas, dont découle l'interdiction de livrer des armes aux belligérants. Les Européens restent divisés, la Grande-Bretagne et la France étant les plus favorables, face aux Pays-Bas, aux Scandinaves et aux Allemands, même si ces derniers ont évolué.

 

Juridiquement, la question est complexe mais pas sans issue, pour permettre, par exemple, de prolonger certains volets de l'embargo, avec des assouplissements qui laisseraient le choix, à ceux qui le souhaitent, de livrer du matériel létal à l'opposition. La posture des Américains pourrait peser en la matière. De même, a contrario, s'il était avéré que les rebelles ont utilisé du gaz sarin, comme l'insinue Carla Del Ponte. Des imputations que l'on considérait, lundi à Paris, avec une grande circonspection.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:30
Syrie: Barack Obama tente de calmer le jeu

07/05/2013 Par Laure Mandeville – Lefigaro.fr

 

Devant la crainte d'une contagion régionale, Washington résiste aux pressions pour intervenir dans le conflit.

 

Avec la stupéfiante affirmation de Carla Del Ponte, selon laquelle l'utilisation de gaz sarin en Syrie pourrait avoir été le fait des rebelles et non du régime d'Assad, la confusion redouble à Washington sur la marche à suivre, même si la Maison-Blanche s'est dite hier «hautement sceptique» sur l'hypothèse d'une utilisation d'armes chimiques par les insurgés, pointant du doigt le pouvoir. Dans le brouillard de la guerre syrienne, l'appel à la prudence d'Obama s'en trouve renforcé, lui permettant de gagner du temps.

 

Cette prudence apparaît comme un réflexe salutaire, au moment où le président semblait tenté de céder aux pressions de faucons du Congrès qui appellent à une immixtion américaine. «Clairement, la meilleure option est de ne rien faire du tout», juge l'ancien ambassadeur Chas Freeman, spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, consterné par «les fautes d'amateur» de l'Administration, qui a tracé une ligne rouge à propos des armes chimiques «sans même avoir réfléchi à ce que pourrait être une réponse américaine». «La situation est incertaine et exige la plus grande circonspection», confirme une source diplomatique occidentale. En même temps, l'inaction ne sera pas «acceptable bien longtemps», car le conflit menace de déborder, souligne Brian Katulis, expert au Center for American Progress.

 

Après deux longues guerres en Irak et en Afghanistan, l'idée que l'Amérique doive cesser de policer le monde est ancrée dans la tête du président américain et de ses concitoyens. Quelque 62% des Américains sont opposés à une action ­militaire en Syrie. Obama reste persuadé que la seule bataille à mener est celle de la reconstruction de l'Amérique. En août, il avait bloqué une initiative de la secrétaire d'État Hillary Clinton, du patron du Pentagone Leon Panetta et du chef de la CIA David Petraeus, qui prônaient la fourniture d'armes aux insurgés, craignant d'armer des djihadistes proches d'al-Qaida.

 

Accusé de faiblesse, en pleine campagne présidentielle

 

En même temps, parce qu'il était accusé de faiblesse en pleine campagne présidentielle, Obama avait cru bon d'adopter une position de fermeté sur les armes chimiques. Il avait averti le régime d'Assad qu'il s'agirait là d'une «ligne rouge», susceptible de déclencher une réponse des États-Unis. Ce week-end, le New York Times a rapporté que sa sortie avait été une improvisation personnelle, pas le fait d'une position mûrie par le Conseil de sécurité nationale. De fait, Obama a tenté d'en minimiser la portée.

 

Des consultations intenses entre alliés américains, français et britanniques ont été annoncées aux journalistes sur l'évaluation de différentes «options militaires» - de la fourniture d'armes aux rebelles à des frappes aériennes, en passant par une zone d'interdiction de vol. Au Congrès, les partisans d'une intervention se sont rués sur l'aubaine pour souligner que ne rien faire porterait un coup dur à la crédibilité des États-Unis et encouragerait d'éventuels États voyous à les défier.

 

Obama est en train de glisser vers une guerre dont il ne veut pas

 

Boosté par les raids israéliens en Syrie, le sénateur John McCain s'est demandé pourquoi l'Amérique restait si timorée. Un haut responsable de l'Administration a reconnu ce week-end qu'il faudrait sans doute se résoudre à armer les rebelles. «Nous devons travailler… à accélérer le départ d'Assad», a déclaré samedi William Burns, secrétaire d'État adjoint. C'était comme si Obama était en train de glisser vers une guerre dont il ne veut pas. La Maison-Blanche comme le Pentagone restent très réservés sur toute action militaire, contrairement au département d'État.

 

Les déclarations de Carla Del Ponte, même ramenées par l'ONU à des «allégations», représentent une aubaine pour le président. Elles sèment le doute sur «les bons et les méchants» du conflit, un flou dont le «logiciel» psychologique américain, plutôt binaire, a du mal à s'accommoder. Pour l'ancien ambassadeur Freeman, il n'y a aucune option satisfaisante. Les États-Unis, la France et la Grande-Bretagne ont, selon lui, fait une erreur en appelant au départ d'Assad en 2011, «tuant tout espoir de dialogue». Une autre faute a été commise sur les armes chimiques, car, en instaurant une ligne rouge rhétorique, on a ouvert la porte à «des manipulations, les Syriens étant des maîtres de la fabrication de preuves». Ainsi, la gestion du dossier est «prisonnière des débats internes» aux États-Unis et «déconnectée d'un conflit régional qui s'étend».

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 11:11
Le missile balistique intercontinental M51 qui s'est «auto-détruit» en vol a été tiré depuis le sous-marin nucléaire Le Vigilant, dimanche matin. - photo Marine Nationale

Le missile balistique intercontinental M51 qui s'est «auto-détruit» en vol a été tiré depuis le sous-marin nucléaire Le Vigilant, dimanche matin. - photo Marine Nationale

06/05/2013 Par Marc Mennessier – LeFigaro.fr

 

Capable d'envoyer des bombes nucléaires sur des sites distants de 8000 kilomètres, le M51 est un missile balistique intercontinental. La plupart des fusées civiles actuelles, comme Soyouz ou Ariane, descendent de cette catégorie d'armes dont peu de pays ont acquis la maîtrise.

 

Le missile balistique intercontinental M51, qui s'est «auto-détruit» en vol peu après avoir été tiré depuis le sous-marin nucléaire Le Vigilant, dimanche matin, au large d'Audierne (Finistère), est l'une des pièces maîtresses de la force de frappe française.

 

D'une hauteur de 12 mètres, pour un poids «maximal de 56 tonnes», le M51 est en fait une véritable fusée, composée de plusieurs étages de propulsion, capable de transporter six ogives ou têtes nucléaires à une distance d'environ 8000 kilomètres de son point de décollage. Pour cela, il suit une trajectoire en forme de parabole au cours de laquelle il pénètre dans l'espace avant que ses charges ne retombent vers leur cible. Pendant cette phase dite balistique, sa trajectoire n'est soumise qu'à la gravité et aux forces de frottement des hautes couches de l'atmosphère.

 

Ces technologies de pointe, que seul un petit nombre d'États, dont la France, maîtrise, font que le M51 n'a, hormis son nom, que peu de choses en commun avec les missiles conventionnels, de bien plus petit calibre, utilisés lors de conflits régionaux, au Proche-Orient notamment. Son prix de 120 millions d'euros, annoncé dimanche par certaines sources, n'a donc rien d'exorbitant, même si ce chiffre, classé «secret défense», reste au demeurant invérifiable.

 

Cinq tirs d'essais réussis

 

Il faut savoir que tous les lanceurs civils actuels, comme Soyouz ou Ariane, sont issus de missiles intercontinentaux développés au plus fort de la Guerre froide par les Américains et les Soviétiques. La fusée Mercury qui envoya Alan Shepard, le premier astronaute américain, dans l'espace, en 1961, descendait du missile Atlas, lui-même issu du V2 conçu par les Allemands pendant la Seconde guerre mondiale. De même la fusée Zemiorka, qui permit la mise en orbite de Spoutnik en 1957, était à l'origine un missile intercontinental soviétique. Enfin, les fusées Rockot utilisées par l'Agence spatiale européenne pour lancer certains de ses satellites d'observation de la Terre (Goce, Cryosat…) sont d'anciens missiles soviétiques SS 19 reconvertis.

 

Validé en 2010, après cinq tirs d'essais réussis (trois depuis des installations terrestres, deux depuis un autre sous-marin, Le Terrible), le M51 est fabriqué par Astrium, la division espace du groupe européen EADS. Il remplace le missile Mer-Sol M45, d'une portée moindre (6000 km).

 

Dimanche, son sixième tir d'expérimentation avait lieu, pour la première fois, depuis Le Vigilant. Selon le ministère de la Défense, le missile, sans charge nucléaire comme pour tout essai, est «sorti normalement» du sous-marin. C'est lors de «la première phase de vol qu'un incident s'est produit et a entraîné son autodestruction». Une commission d'enquête va être diligentée afin d'établir les causes de ce premier échec d'un missile intercontinental français «depuis 1996». Ses résultats ne devraient cependant pas être rendus publics, tout ce qui touche à la dissuasion nucléaire étant classé «secret défense».

 

Lundi après-midi, la Marine nationale était toujours à la recherche de débris dont certains gisent par cent mètres de fond au large des côtes finistériennes.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 10:50
Démission surprise du directeur de l’aéronautique de Rolls-Royce

6 mai Aerobuzz.fr

 

Rolls-Royce a annoncé (2 mai 2013) le départ inattendu de Mark King, directeur de la branche aéronautique, quatre mois seulement après la fusion entre les activités civils et militaires de cette dernière. Mark King était directeur de l’unité aéronautique civile avant de prendre la tête de la nouvelle division regroupant les activités civiles et militaires en janvier 2013. Ce départ soudain serait la conséquence d’une décision personnelle. King a travaillé pendant 27 ans chez Rolls-Royce

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 09:23
"L'Europe doit arrêter les coupes budgétaires en matière de défense", selon le secrétaire général de l'OTAN

06-05-2013 AFET Relations extérieures - REF. : 20130506IPR08024

 

"La "puissance douce" seule ne suffit pas", a affirmé, ce lundi, Anders Fogh Rasmussen aux députés européens et députés nationaux qui suivent les affaires étrangères et les questions de sécurité et défense. Plaidant en faveur d'une "ligne similaire en matière budgétaire" en Europe, il a affirmé que celle-ci devait "avoir la volonté politique d'utiliser" les moyens adéquats. Les députés ont également appelé à davantage de coopération entre l'UE et l'OTAN en période de restriction budgétaire.

 

 

"Si les pays européens ne s'engagent pas fermement à investir dans la sécurité et la défense, toutes les discussions sur une politique européenne de sécurité et de défense resteront lettres mortes", a déclaré M. Rasmussen, ajoutant que le Conseil européen de décembre, dédié à la sécurité et à la défense "devrait montrer que l'Europe est à la fois capable d'agir et a la volonté d'agir".

 

En réponse aux questions de députés sur les moyens de renforcer la coopération entre l'UE et l'OTAN, M. Rasmussen a déclaré que celle-ci était fluide sur le lieu des opérations, par exemple au Kosovo et en Afghanistan. Cependant, il a souligné "la situation absurde" dans laquelle l'UE et l'OTAN "peuvent seulement débattre de la Bosnie lors de réunions formelles" et a affirmé que cette situation se poursuivrait à moins qu'une solution au conflit entre Chypre et la Turquie ne soit trouvée.

 

Eviter la duplication des efforts entre l'UE et l'OTAN

 

En écho aux questions de députés sur la complémentarité entre l'UE et l'OTAN, M. Rasmussen a mis l'accent sur l'accord récent entre Belgrade et Pristina, négocié par l'UE, avec la garantie de l'OTAN en matière de sécurité pour permettre la mise en œuvre de l'accord. Les députés et M. Rasmussen ont également affirmé que les efforts conjoints de l'UE et l'OTAN pour combattre la piraterie dans la corne de l'Afrique avaient été "un succès".

 

Les parlementaires ont demandé au secrétaire général de l'OTAN de s'assurer qu'il n'y aurait pas de duplications entre l'UE et l'OTAN en termes d'efforts et de dépenses liés aux équipements. M. Rasmussen a mentionné, comme exemple positif en la matière, la promesse des membres européens de l'OTAN de s'engager dans le développement de capacités de ravitaillement en vol, afin d'éviter de dépendre des capacités américaines.

 

Les députés ont également posé des questions sur les perspectives d'élargissement de l'OTAN, citant la Géorgie et les pays des Balkans occidentaux. M. Rasmussen a répondu que l'OTAN était prête dès que chaque pays candidat ou candidat potentiel était prêt et respectait ses obligations actuelles.

 

La situation en Syrie après les récentes frappes israéliennes à Damas, les projets de défense antimissile ainsi que la nécessité de renforcer la coopération en termes de cybersécurité ont également été soulevés par les députés et leurs homologues nationaux pendant le débat.

 

Sous la présidence de: Elmar Brok (PPE, DE)

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 07:55
Pourquoi le missile qui s'est abîmé au large du Finistère coûte plus cher que ce qui a été annoncé

06/05/2013 Nabil Bourassi et Michel Cabirol – LaTribune.fr

 

Difficile de chiffrer le coût unitaire du missile balistique M51, un programme top secret lié à la dissuasion nucléaire. Aussi le montant de 120 millions d'euros évoqués par certains médias ne semble pas être le bon. Il est probable que le coût soit en réalité un peu plus élevé...

 

Combien coûte un missile balistique mer-sol M51, tel que celui qui s'est auto-détruit dimanche au large du Finistère après son décollage dans une zone interdite pour la circonstance à la navigation maritime et à la circulation aérienne dans le cadre d'un tir d'essai lancé ? Un essai nécessaire pour la qualification du missile sur "Le Vigilant", le sous-marin nucléaire lanceur d'engins (SNLE) qui l'a mis à feu dans la baie d'Audierne (Finistère). Plusieurs médias avancent un montant de 120 millions d'euros mais, selon une source proche du dossier, ce chiffre, qui fait couler beaucoup d'encre depuis l'annonce par la Marine nationale de l'explosion du missile dépourvu de sa charge nucléaire, n'est pas le bon.

 

Difficile à chiffrer

 

Il est vraisemblable que le coût unitaire d'un M51 soit plus élevé que celui annoncé par la presse. Le coût du M51 dans sa version opérationnelle pourrait se situer autour du coût d'un lanceur Ariane 5 (environ 150 millions d'euros), assure-t-on à La Tribune. En réalité, le coût d'un essai d'un missile M51, qui peut surprendre au moment où la France est contrainte à faire des économies, est difficile à établir en raison des trop nombreuses incertitudes qui pèsent sur ce programme top secret touchant intimement à la souveraineté nationale de la France. Un programme qui s'élève dans sa globalité à plus de 11 milliards d'euros, développement compris, selon le ministère de la Défense. Soit trois lots de 16 missiles M51, qui équipent les quatre SNLE tricolores auxquels il faut rajouter quelques missiles supplémentaires. Impossible d'en connaître avec certitude le nombre d'exemplaires qui seront produits au total.

 

En outre, il faut ajouter le développement de la composante embarquée du système d'armes de dissuasion M51 (CESAD M51) avec notamment le moyen d'essai Cétacé (caisson d'essai de tir), la construction puis l'exploitation des moyens d'essais, l'approvisionnement et la mise en place de cette CESAD M51 à bord des trois premiers SNLE NG (Le Triomphant, Le Téméraire, Le Vigilant), la fourniture de la logistique initiale à terre et, enfin, l'adaptation au M51 du centre d'entraînement des forces sous-marines. Le SNLE "Le Vigilant", qui a lancé le M51 dimanche, a ainsi été immobilisé plusieurs mois pour pouvoir accueillir ce nouveau missile. Les sous-marins, à l'exception du SNLE « Le Terrible », qui a été construit directement en version M51, doivent être adaptés à ce missile, qui est d'une plus grande taille et plus lourd que le missile M45.

 

Un programme stratégique

 

L'enjeu stratégique du M51, lancé en 1992 et piloté par la filiale spatiale d'EADS, Astrium, a été confirmé par le nouveau Livre blanc de la Défense et de la sécurité nationale, un document publié lundi dernier qui renouvelle la doctrine de la France en matière de défense. Le président François Hollande avait demandé aux auteurs du Livre blanc de sanctuariser la dissuasion nucléaire (aéroportée et maritime). D'où la nécessité pour la France de disposer d'équipements modernes. Résultat de cette ambition, le M51, dont le permier vol est intervenu en nobembre 2006, est un bijou de technologies militaires et présente des "différences significatives par rapport à son prédécesseur", écrit Astrium sur son site internet.

 

Il mesure 12 mètres de haut et pèse 50 tonnes sur la balance, soit 15 tonnes de plus que son prédécesseur, le M45. Il est également capable de se projeter sur un rayon de 8.000 km contre 6.000 km auparavant, et ce, à la vitesse de Mach 15, soit plus de 18.000 km/h. Enfin, le M51 peut transporter jusqu'à 10 têtes nucléaires contre 6 pour la génération précédente. Le M51 dispose d'une capacité d'emport supérieure et adaptable, d'une meilleure portée, et bénéficiera d'une plus grande aptitude à pénétrer les défenses adverses grâce à la furtivité des têtes et aux nouvelles aides à la pénétration associées. Le M51.2, une version modernisée du M51 opérationnelle à partir de 2015, emportera la tête nucléaire TNO (tête nucléaire océanique au lieu des têtes nucléaires TN75 actuelles). Son niveau de sûreté nucléaire est accru.

 

Une enquête top secrète

 

Pour toutes ces raisons, la Marine nationale a engagé des prospections dans la baie d'Audierne afin de récupérer les débris du missile, qui gisent par une centaine de mètres de fond. Des robots sous-marins ont même été envoyés pour sonder le fond de la baie et récupérer la moindre trace de ce missile. Le capitaine de Corvette, Lionel Delort, a admis que l'essai balistique était un "échec" et qu'une enquête allait être conduite afin d'en déterminer les raisons. La Marine nationale ou l'industriel ne communiqueront pas les conclusions de cette enquête qui sera classée secret défense.

 

L'enquête va suivre un processus bien huilé. La direction générale de l'armement (DGA), les industriels, notamment Astrium, et la Marine vont dans un premier temps récupérer toutes les données de l'essai raté, puis les analyser. "Cela peut prendre quelques jours, voire quelques mois, on part sans a priori mais c'est sans doute un phénomène complexe à analyser", explique-t-on à La Tribune. Et cette équipe d'ingénieurs va soit éliminer, soit confirmer une à une les causes de cet échec.

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 07:50
Workshop on Biological Threat Detection Standards

Dublin | May 03, 2013 European Defence Agency

 

On 15 April the European Defence Agency organised a workshop on test and evaluation (T&E) standards for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defence (CBRN) detection under the auspices of the Irish Presidency.

 

Participants from national ministries of defence, industry and research organisations/universities attended the event which focused on T&E equipment standards for biological threat detection as dealt with in the EDA project T&E BIODIM.

 

Conclusions of the workshop are:

 

    The need for standards / harmonisation and common agreed protocols/standards for Test and Evaluation of (B) detection equipment was confirmed;

    The EDA project T&E BIODIM will form the backbone for further developments in this area;

    Civ-Mil synergies are recognised and will be elaborated between the Agency and the European Commission under the European Framework Cooperation;

    Recent EC workshop on Standards Mandate in JRC ISPRA confirmed high priority for test and evaluation/detection standards;

    Common agreed EU protocols/ standards  will create a win-win situation for end-users and industry:

        For end-users in terms of interoperability (mil-mil, civ-civ and civ-mil) and  sensor network capabilities;

        For industry in terms of cost reduction and level playing field and clarity on parameters they are tested against.

    “Live (= real)” agent testing for identification equipment/ procedures is needed.

 

More information:

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 07:50
OCCAR: Tiger Programme Contract Notice
 
Brussels | Apr 30, 2013 European Defence Agency
 

OCCAR, EDA’s partner in developing European defence capabilities, manages the Tiger Helicopter programme on behalf of Germany, France and Spain.

 

In a common approach towards personnel training, the German-French Tiger Helicopter Technical School (Deutsch-Französisches Ausbildungseinrichtung TIGER - DFAT) opened in 2003 in Fassberg, Germany. The mission of the School is to provide training to French and German Tiger Helicopter Technicians for the maintenance of the Tiger Helicopter in HAP and UHT versions. In 2013, the School will have also to start training technicians on the HAD version.

OCCAR: Tiger Programme Contract Notice

To analyse additional training needs and define the necessary training means to cover requirements of the German-French Tiger Helicopter Technical School, OCCAR wants to place a contract with industry.

 

To attract industry’s attention to this business opportunity, a contract notice has been published as a first step in the tendering process. Details on this contract notice can be found under this link: www.occar.int/221.

 

More information:
Partager cet article
Repost0
7 mai 2013 2 07 /05 /mai /2013 07:30
CEMA : Déplacement en Arabie saoudite et au Koweït

06/05/2013 Sources : EMA

 

A l’invitation de ses homologues saoudien et koweïtien, l’amiral Edouard Guillaud, chef d’état-major des armées, s’est rendu dans la région du Golfe arabo-persique entre le 20 et le 22 avril.

 

Lors de son passage à Riyad, l’amiral Guillaud s’est entretenu avec de nombreuses autorités politiques et militaires dont le général d’armée Hussein Bin Abdallah Qubayel, chef d’état-major des forces armées du Royaume d’Arabie Saoudite. Les relations entre les deux armées sont anciennes et s’appuient tant sur la formation que sur la coopération opérationnelle. En effet, depuis 30 ans la France a formé dans ses écoles militaires plus de 500 officiers et ingénieurs militaires saoudiens. Cette formation des élites militaires saoudiennes permet aujourd’hui de développer une coopération opérationnelle de haut niveau dans les trois composantes ainsi que dans le domaine des opérations spéciales.C’est d’ailleurs dans le domaine des forces spéciales qu’avait eu lieu l’exercice Tigre II en Corse à l’automne 2012. Dans le domaine maritime, le dernier exercice bilatéral a eu lieu début avril à l’occasion du passage du groupe Jeanne d’Arc en mer Rouge.

 

L’amiral Guillaud a été reçu le lendemain à Koweït City par le Premier ministre, le ministre de la défense et le général de corps aérien Khaled Al Jarah Al Sabah, chef d’état-major des armées koweïtiennes. Lors du dîner officiel et de la réunion de travail à l’état-major koweïtien, l’amiral Guillaud a pu recueillir l’avis de son homologue sur la situation régionale et évoquer avec lui de nouvelles pistes de coopération. Le prochain exercice Pearl of the West, prévu de se dérouler au Koweït en 2014, constituera à cet égard un rendez-vous important pour les deux pays.

 

A travers ses liens bilatéraux avec les pays du Golfe, régulièrement entretenus par des exercices conjoints et des visites d’autorités, la France est un acteur essentiel pour la sécurité et la stabilité de la région.

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories