Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
A drone found crashed in South Korea (Photo: Korean Ministry of Defense)

A drone found crashed in South Korea (Photo: Korean Ministry of Defense)

 

September 29, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The growing availability of small, inexpensive UAVs that can (and are) used by criminals and Islamic terrorists has led to the development of several Anti-UAV Defense Systems (AUDS). These systems consist of multiple sensors (visual, heat, radar) to detect the small UAVs and a focused radio signal jammer to cut the UAV off from its controller and prevent (in most cases) the UAV from completing its mission. The detection range of AUDS is usually 10 kilometers or more and jamming range varies from a few kilometers to about eight.

 

AUDS can be defeated. For example a user can send a small UAV off on a pre-programmed mission. This can be to take photos or deliver a small explosive. No one has tried, at least successfully, using armed micro-UAVs yet but North Korea has been caught using small recon UAVs flying under automatic control.

 

If these UAVs are still detected they have to be destroyed via ground or air-to-air fire. This the South Koreans and Israelis have had to do several times. The Israelis were dealing with Palestinian Islamic terrorist groups using small UAVs, often Iranian models. South Korea and Israel has responded by adding more sensor systems, especially new radars that can detect the smallest UAVs moving at any speed and altitude. An American firm has demonstrated a high-powered laser that can take down small UAVs several kilometers away.

 

North Korea had been interested in UAVs since the 1970s but had never bought or built a lot of them. In the late 1980s North Korea acquired some of China’s first generation UAVs (ASN-104s). These were 140 kg (304 pound) aircraft with a 30 kg (66 pound) payload and endurance of two hours. Very crude by today’s standards but it took real time video and higher resolution still photos. In the 1990s the North Koreans produced some ASN-104s, apparently by just copying the Chinese ones they had. In the 1990s North Korea got some Russian DR-3 jet powered UAVs. These were faster but less useful than the ASN-104s. Attempts to use the DR-3 as the basis for a cruise missile design failed. In the 1990s North Korea also got some Russian Pchela-1T UAVs. These were very similar to the ASN-104s and that means not very useful at all. The Chinese and Russians used these first generation UAVs mainly for correcting artillery fire and this is what North Korea was seen doing with them, particularly North Korean coastal artillery.

 

In 2014 South Korea was alarmed to discover three North Korean UAVs that had crashed in South Korea. It was soon discovered that North Korea was using modified versions of the commercial Chinese SKY-09P UAV. North Korea gave the SKY-09Ps a new paint job (to make it harder to spot), a muffler (to make it less detectable) and installed a different camera. The SKY-09P was used via its robotic mode, where the SKY-09P flew to pre-programmed GPS coordinates, taking digital photos over selected areas and returned with those photos stored on a memory card. The SKY-09Ps found in South Korea had GPS coordinates in their guidance system showing they originated and were to return to a location in North Korea. The memory cards showed pictures of South Korean government (mainly military) facilities.

 

Thus the most successful UAV the North Koreans ever used turned out to be a Chinese commercial model, the SKY-09P. This is a 12 kg (26 pound) delta wing aircraft with a wingspan of 1.92 meters (6.25 feet), propeller in the front and a payload of three kg (6.6 pounds). It is launched via a catapult and lands via a parachute. Endurance is 90 minutes and cruising speed is 90 kilometers an hour. When controlled from the ground it can go no farther than 40 kilometers from the controller. But when placed on automatic it can go about 60 kilometers into South Korea and return with photos. These things cost the North Koreans a few thousand dollars each. While South Korea says they detected two of the three crashed North Korea UAVs no other details were provided. The Chinese manufacturer denied selling anything to North Korea, but the North Koreans typically use a third party for purchases like this.  

Partager cet article
Repost0
21 septembre 2015 1 21 /09 /septembre /2015 07:20
MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

 

AFA AIR & SPACE, WASHINGTON – 15 September 2015General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc

 

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA‑ASI), a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions, today announced that its Predator® B/MQ-9 Reaper® Extended Range (Reaper ER) RPA fleet has achieved a historic milestone with the first operational fielding of Reaper ER by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) last month.

“Reaper ER provides a tremendous capability increase in both range and endurance, and achieving this major program milestone wouldn’t have been possible without the dedication and commitment of our employees,” said Frank W. Pace, president, Aircraft Systems, GA-ASI. “We are pleased that the Reaper ER program has met the expectations of our Air Force customer and satisfied the enormous challenge of their Quick Reaction Capability [QRC] schedule requirement.”

A Reaper can be transformed into a Reaper ER through the integration of a field-retrofittable modification package consisting of two wing-mounted fuel tanks which significantly extend the aircraft’s maximum endurance. Reaper’s original external payload carriage configuration remains unchanged, providing the aircraft with a “mix and match” capability that allows it to carry both fuel tanks and an assortment of external payloads. To increase thrust and improve takeoff performance at higher gross weights, an alcohol/water injection system and a four-bladed propeller were incorporated, along with a heavyweight trailing arm landing gear system that enables safe ground operations at the heavier gross weight.

The Reaper ER program was a QRC requirement in support of USAF which challenged GA-ASI to deliver 38 Reaper ER aircraft in 13 months, and to be operational 18 months following contract award. The ER modification package was designed to be field-retrofittable so that fuel tanks and associated equipment could be installed quickly and conveniently on current Reapers at worldwide locations.

In related news, GA-ASI announced that Reaper ER has earned the company an honor from Aviation Week, with the company being named as a finalist for the 2015 Program Excellence Awards in the category of System. Reaper ER was selected for GA-ASI’s efforts to introduce unique and innovative changes to standard production programs in the execution of the aircraft’s production, including an innovative approach to leading and managing a QRC that implemented a disciplined production environment to meet a very challenging schedule. The company also was recognized for partnering with the U.S. Government to streamline the production line and adjust tools and processes to improve the execution of the program.

“This year’s Program Excellence submissions provided a wealth of lessons learned and best practices, from driving down cycle time and affecting the learning curve to process innovations that allow program teams to work smarter and achieve better results,” said Carole Hedden, Program Excellence editorial director for Aviation Week. “Our evaluation team of program experts narrowed the field from 72 original nominations to a field of 23 finalists who exemplified the best in creating value, adapting to complexity, team effectiveness, and producing results.”

The winners of the Program Excellence Awards will be announced November 4 in Scottsdale, Ariz.

High-resolution photos of Reaper ER are available to qualified media outlets from the GA-ASI media contact listed below.  

 

About GA-ASI

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., an affiliate of General Atomics, delivers situational awareness by providing remotely piloted aircraft systems, radar, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions for military and commercial applications worldwide. The company’s Aircraft Systems business unit is a leading designer and manufacturer of proven, reliable RPA systems, including Predator A, Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper, Gray Eagle, the new Predator C Avenger®, and Predator XP. It also manufactures a variety of state-of-the-art digital Ground Control Stations (GCS), including the next-generation Advanced Cockpit GCS, and provides pilot training and support services for RPA field operations. The Mission Systems business unit designs, manufactures, and integrates the Lynx® Multi-mode Radar and sophisticated Claw® sensor control and image analysis software into both manned and remotely piloted aircraft. It also focuses on providing integrated sensor payloads and software for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft platforms and develops high energy lasers, electro-optic sensors, and meta-material antennas. For more information, please visit www.ga-asi.com.

Predator, Reaper, Avenger, Lynx, and Claw are registered trademarks of General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

Partager cet article
Repost0
20 septembre 2015 7 20 /09 /septembre /2015 16:20
MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

 

20.09.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

Le 15 septembre, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems a annoncé le premier déploiement opérationnel de son Reaper Extended Range (Reaper ER). Un appareil qui peut rester en vol pendant 33 heures au lieu des 27 heures actuelles.

L'USAF avait exprimé en 2013 le besoin de drones armés ou de surveillance aux capacités accrues. 38 appareils doivent être modifiés

Selon General Atomics (lire ici), le kit comprend deux bidons sous les ailes et une nouvelle hélice à quatre pales. Les capacités d'emport (armement et équipement ISR) restent inchangées. 

Selon Defense Updates, GA-ASI cherche aussi à améliorer les performances des appareils dédiés à l'ISR dont l'autonomie pourrait être portée à 42 heures, en remplaçant les ailes actuelles de 20m par des ailes de 24m.

Partager cet article
Repost0
17 septembre 2015 4 17 /09 /septembre /2015 16:50
photo Richard Seymour_Thales

photo Richard Seymour_Thales


16.09.2015 Thales Group
 

Le nouveau système de drone modulaire Watchkeeper X de Thales reflète le besoin croissant de capacités performantes de renseignement, de surveillance, d'acquisition d’objectifs et de reconnaissance (ISTAR), aux derniers standards militaires, pour des marchés élargis. Offrant différentes options d’adaptation aux exigences opérationnelles spécifiques, sa polyvalence en fait un système idéal pour assurer des fonctions ISTAR dans un large éventail d’opérations aériennes, terrestres et navales.  Il offre également des capacités de réaction rapide pour déjouer différents types de menaces. Le Watchkeeper X sera produit en partenariat, dans le cadre d’une collaboration avec les industriels locaux.  Cette approche originale en matière de drones permet aux clients d’établir une véritable souveraineté nationale.

 

Au cœur du Watchkeeper X se trouve un système de drone certifié, très performant et éprouvé au combat. S’appuyant sur cette base, Thales offre désormais différentes options en matière de capteurs, d’exploitation, de mobilité et d’effecteurs, pouvant être intégrées, mises à niveau et adaptées pour disposer de capacités modulaires et évolutives, propres à répondre aux besoins actuels et futurs.  

L’option capteurs s’appuie sur une configuration avec double charge utile offrant caméras, radars, capacités de surveillance électronique, et une exploitation simultanée entièrement intégrée. L’option mobilité permet de disposer d’un éventail de solutions pour assurer des opérations à partir d’une infrastructure fixe, ou dans le cadre de déploiements ou de forces expéditionnaires de grande ampleur. L’option exploitation tire profit de l’expérience de Thales en matière de gestion et de diffusion des données pour fournir des outils tels que des liaisons de données afin de diffuser des informations adaptées n’importe où dans le monde, de les protéger et les exploiter avec une efficacité maximale. Enfin, l’option effecteurs fournit les capacités nécessaires pour délivrer les effets nécessaires, directement ou indirectement.

Fort de ses avantages en termes de déploiement rapide, d’autonomie, de modularité des charges utiles et de frappes de précision, le système Watchkeeper X répond au besoin croissant de capacités ISTAR. Construit selon les mêmes normes que les aéronefs pilotés, ce drone peut être transporté aisément et sa conception modulaire lui permet d’être adapté à des exigences opérationnelles spécifiques. Pouvant intégrer à tout moment les apports technologiques les plus récents, ce système  offre la souplesse requise pour évoluer en fonction des priorités stratégiques.

« Le Watchkeeper X est basé sur un système de drone innovant, unique dans le monde, conçu spécifiquement pour les besoins des forces britanniques. Il n’existe rien d’équivalent sur le marché mondial actuel. Les connaissances et l’expertise acquises  au cours de ce programme nous permettent d’offrir à nos clients un système disposant d’encore plus de souplesse, d’efficacité et de disponibilité, afin de les aider à répondre aux différents contextes opérationnels auxquels ils sont confrontés. »

Pierre Eric Pommellet, Directeur général adjoint, Systèmes de mission de défense de Thales

Partager cet article
Repost0
17 septembre 2015 4 17 /09 /septembre /2015 16:30
photo USAF

photo USAF

 

17 septembre 2015 Romandie.com (AFP)

 

Paris - Le chef jihadiste algérien Saïd Arif, vétéran du jihad en Afghanistan, a bien été tué en mai en Syrie par un tir de drone américain, ont indiqué jeudi à l'AFP des responsables français ayant requis l'anonymat.

 

La mort de ce déserteur de l'armée algérienne, âgé de 49 ans et considéré comme un important recruteur de combattants étrangers pour la Syrie, avait été mentionnée au printemps par des sites internet et sur les réseaux sociaux, mais n'avait jusqu'à présent pas été confirmée.

 

Ses états de service dans la mouvance islamiste radicale en avaient fait une figure du jihad international : il avait commencé dans les années 90 par rejoindre les camps d'Al-Qaïda en Afghanistan, où il avait côtoyé les chefs de l'époque, dont Oussama ben Laden.

PUBLICITÉ

 

Au début des années 2000, il avait été arrêté et poursuivi en France pour sa participation à des filières d'envoi de combattants en Tchétchénie et à des complots visant notamment le marché de Noël de Strasbourg (est) et la tour Eiffel.

 

Condamné en 2007 à dix ans de prison, il avait été libéré en décembre 2011. Il devait être expulsé de France mais la Cour européenne des droits de l'Homme avait demandé à ce qu'il ne soit pas envoyé en Algérie, où il risquait d'être torturé.

 

Il avait donc été assigné à résidence dans un hôtel de Brioude dans le centre de la France. Contraint de pointer quatre fois par jour à la gendarmerie locale, il était fréquemment filmé, longue barbe blanche et survêtements, marchant dans les rues de la petite ville.

 

Il donnait même des interviews à la presse locale, assurant notamment que les attentats-suicide ayant une dimension économique sont le meilleur moyen de lutte pour les islamistes, ce qui lui avait valu des poursuites supplémentaires.

 

Un matin de mai 2013, il n'était pas descendu au petit-déjeuner : il avait dans la nuit volé la voiture de la belle-fille de l'hôtelier. Elle avait été quelques heures plus tard flashée sur une autoroute menant en Belgique.

 

De là, Saïd Arif a gagné la Syrie où il est devenu l'un des chef de Jund al-Aqsa, groupe jihadiste proche du Front al-Nosra, la branche syrienne d'Al-Qaïda. Il était considéré comme l'un des principaux organisateurs de l'accueil en Syrie de combattants volontaires internationaux, surtout francophones.

 

Il avait été en août 2014 ajouté par les États-Unis à leur liste noire des principaux terroristes internationaux, par l'ONU sur sa liste des extrémistes sanctionnés pour leurs liens avec Al-Qaïda et était recherché par Interpol.

Partager cet article
Repost0
16 septembre 2015 3 16 /09 /septembre /2015 11:20
photo USAF

photo USAF

 

15.09.2015 sputniknews.com

 

Les Etats-Unis sont en train de développer un nouvel avion de reconnaissance afin de remplacer l'U-2 en service depuis plus de 50 ans.

 

La division Skunk Works du groupe américain Lockheed Martin a présenté le projet d'un avion de reconnaissance capable de remplacer aussi bien l'U-2 Dragon Lady que le drone Global Hawk, rapportent les médias occidentaux.

 

Le nouvel avion doit être développé d'ici 2025. D'après le magazine Ainonline, les Etats-Unis pourraient avoir besoin de ce type d'appareil au cours des trois prochaines années.

 

Le Lockheed U-2 est un avion-espion en service dans l'US Air Force depuis plus de 50 ans. Il est capable de voler pendant 12 heures à plus de 21.000 mètres d'altitude. Sa vitesse  maximale est supérieure à 800 km/h.

 

Un de ces appareils a été abattu le 1er mai 1960 alors qu'il effectuait un vol de reconnaissance au-dessus de l'Union soviétique. Cet épisode a alors entraîné une détérioration des relations entre Moscou et Washington.

 

Développé par Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical (filiale de Northrop Grumman), le Global Hawk est un drone de reconnaissance américain conçu pour des missions stratégiques. L'appareil a effectué son premier vol le 28 février 1998 depuis une base aérienne en Californie. Il est capable de voler pendant 30 heures à 18.000 mètres d'altitude.

Partager cet article
Repost0
16 septembre 2015 3 16 /09 /septembre /2015 07:30
Counter-Terrorism: Jordan Gets By With A Little Help From Its Friends

 

September 13, 2015: Strategy Page

 

Jordan recently revealed more details of the Israeli assistance it was receiving for the fight against Islamic terrorism. Israel has supplied Jordan with a dozen lightweight Slylark UAVs and the services of one or more larger Heron TP UAVs. Israel has also provided special electronics and software so that Jordan can more effectively track its own troops and possible Islamic terrorist activity. There appears to be some cooperation in the area of special operations (command0) troops. Both nations have a good track record in this area but Jordan can more easily put their commandos into Iraq or Syria than can Israel.

 

It’s no secret that since the late 1960s Israel and Jordan have been on good terms. This is mutually beneficial because both nations have large numbers of Palestinians to deal with and these Palestinians tend to be a source of disloyalty for both the Jewish dominated democracy of Israel and the Bedouin (Arab) monarchy of Jordan. Since the American invasion of Iraq in 2003 Jordan has had to deal with lots of refugees and, for a while, more Islamic terror attacks. Jordan continues to keep Islamic terrorists from reaching Israel via Jordan and provides valuable intel on what is going on in Syria and Iraq and the Arab world in general. As it has done for decades, Israel also passes on any useful intel to Jordan, especially if it involves attacks against the royal family.

 

Jordan is poor and does not have a lot of money for new equipment. Thus the arrival of the Israeli Skylark UAVs was much appreciated. This UAV has been around since 2008, has an impressive combat record and a new version (Skylard 1LE) recently showed up. This is a 7.5 kg (16.5 pound) aircraft with a 1.1 kg (2.4 pound) payload. This is sufficient to carry Israeli designed vidcam, laser designator and communications gear that can work with the American Rover ground terminals (designed to let commanders on the ground see what UAVs are seeing). Max endurance is three hours, max altitude is 4,700 meters (15,000 feet). Max distance from the operator is 40 kilometers.

 

The Heron TP has been in service since 2009 and is similar to the 4.5 ton American Reaper. Equipped with a powerful (1,200 horsepower) turboprop engine, the 4.6 ton Heron TP can operate at 14,500 meters (45,000 feet). That is above commercial air traffic and all the air-traffic-control regulations that discourage, and often forbid, UAVs fly at the same altitude as commercial aircraft. The Heron TP has a one ton payload, enabling it to carry sensors that can give a detailed view of what's on the ground, even from that high up. The endurance of 36 hours makes the Heron TP a competitor for the U.S. five ton MQ-9 Reaper. The big difference between the two is that Reaper is designed to be a combat aircraft, operating at a lower altitude, with less endurance, and able to carry a ton of smart bombs or missiles. Heron TP is meant mainly for reconnaissance and surveillance, and Israel wants to keep a closer, and more persistent, eye on Syria, southern Lebanon and now parts of Jordan threatened by ISIL. The Heron TP has also been rigged to carry a wide variety of missiles and smart bombs.

 

In the 1967 war with Israel, the Jordanians caused the Israelis more trouble than any other Arab army. Since then, the Israelis and Jordanians have maintained good relations, partly because of the realization that war between the two nations would be particularly bloody. Jordan also became a good ally of the United States, and American Special Forces have worked with their Jordanian counterparts for decades. Another thing that keeps the Jordanian troops on their toes is the fact that most Jordanians are non-Bedouin Palestinians, a population that has produced a lot of terrorists and disloyal Jordanians. The royal family of Jordan, from an ancient Bedouin family, takes very good care of the largely Bedouin armed forces, which provides security for the royal family.

Partager cet article
Repost0
15 septembre 2015 2 15 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
Swiss parliament approves Hermes 900 deal

 

08 September, 2015 BY: Arie Egozi - FG

 

The Swiss parliament on 7 September voted in favour of an armed forces plan to buy six Elbit Systems Hermes 900 unmanned air vehicles, in a deal valued at $256 million.

 

Last year, the Hermes 900 was selected by the Swiss armed forces, but the signing of a contract was delayed until the receipt of political approval. A deal should now be signed within the next few weeks. The Hermes 900 UAVs to be supplied to Switzerland will be in an upgraded version that will improve performance in some parameters. One of the enhancements is the provision of a heavy fuel engine, which will enable the aircraft to achieve a higher rate of climb after take-off – a key requirement because of the country's mountainous terrain.

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 septembre 2015 1 14 /09 /septembre /2015 16:50
The future of European drone programmes
 

14-09-2015 - by SEDE

 

On 22 September the Subcommittee will debate the future of European drone programmes with representatives of the European Defence Agency and the European Commission.

Partager cet article
Repost0
14 septembre 2015 1 14 /09 /septembre /2015 16:45
photo U.N.

photo U.N.

 

14 September 2015 by Africa Defense Forum

 

With unmanned aircraft changing the dynamics of warfare, it should come as no surprise that the technology is changing peacekeeping as well.

 

Since the end of 2013, the United Nations has used unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs and drones, to fly over the volatile eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The 5-meter-long Selex ES Falco drones monitor remote regions that U.N. peacekeeping troops can’t reach. The drones, equipped with cameras, heat-signature equipment and night-vision technology, can conduct surveillance in the dark and detect movement below a thick tree canopy — a new frontier in intelligence-gathering. The drones patrol the eastern border at a low altitude, monitoring rebels and militia, and also track illegal mining in the region. The DRC mission known by the acronym MONUSCO is the first time the U.N. has used drones for peacekeeping. Although the sophisticated UAVs aren’t cheap, they are becoming more affordable. The initial cost of the two-drone mission was estimated at $15 million per year, or about 1 percent of the mission’s annual budget. The mission has since added three more drones, although one of them crashed in October 2014. “They provide a very good bang for the buck,” a U.N. official told FoxNews.com. “When you are thinly spread in the region, these UAVs provide an extra set of eyes for our peacekeepers in the DRC.” Drone use in the military is here to stay. As of early 2012, at least 10 African countries had established some type of drone program.

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
12 septembre 2015 6 12 /09 /septembre /2015 16:35
New Delhi Nods +$400 Million Israeli Mega Drone Procurement

 

Sep 12, 2015 defense-update.com

 

The IAF has been seeking an unmanned, precision attack capability as a matter of high priority. These new drones will be operated by the Indian Air Force (IAF), which already has a large fleet of Searcher and Heron I reconnaissance drones. Both are produced by Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI).

 

The Indian government recently approved a plan to procure ten new missile-armed drones from Israel. “The $400-million proposal for buying armed Heron TP drones from Israel was cleared last week,” The Economic Times reported.

These new drones will be operated by the Indian Air Force (IAF), which already has a large fleet of Searcher and Heron I reconnaissance drones. Both are produced by Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI). The IAF also has a fleet of Harpy UAVs from Israel – designed as loitering radar-supression weapons. In addition,India operates the HAROP, a spin-off variant of the loitering weapon, designed to attack other surface targets. (Both Harpy and Harop are also made by IAI).

The proposed sale of the Heron TP to India had been on the table since 2012, but, only after the election of the new Modi government, did it receive the necessary political backing.

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
9 septembre 2015 3 09 /09 /septembre /2015 16:55
Drones tactiques : et le gagnant sera connu avant la fin de 2015

Les drones tactiques Sperwer arrivent en fin de service opérationnel. Safran et Thales proposent des systèmes de nouvelle génération au ministère de la Défense. (Crédits :JC Moreau - Safran)

 

09/09/2015 Par Michel Cabirol  - LaTribune.fr

 

Safran et Thales se disputent un appel d'offre pour la fourniture de 14 systèmes de drones tactiques. En revanche, Airbus Defence and Space n'a finalement pas déposé d'offre engageante fin août.

 

C'est la toute dernière ligne droite pour la sélection d'un industriel dans le cadre de l'appel d'offres sur les drones tactiques, baptisé SDT (système de drone tactique). Les industriels ont remis fin août leur offre engageante (BAFO, ou Best And Final Offer) à la direction générale de l'armement (DGA) qui est en train de les étudier. La décision doit être prise d'ici à la fin de l'année lors d'un comité ministériel d'investissement (CMI) et la notification par la DGA devrait intervenir fin décembre.

Et il y a urgence d'ailleurs. "Nous avons un besoin opérationnel fort", confirme-t-on au sein du ministère. Destinés à l'armée de terre, ces systèmes doivent remplacer à l'horizon 2017 les drones SDTI (ou Sperwer), fabriqués par Safran.

 

Airbus hors-jeu

Dans le cadre de cette compétition, Sagem (groupe Safran) s'est lancé dans la bagarre avec le Patroller, une plateforme à partir d'un planeur motorisé fabriqué par l'entreprise allemande Stemme. De son côté, Thales compte gagner avec le Watchkeeper, qui est une "anglicisation" par Thales UK d'un drone du groupe israélien Elbit. Dans le cadre du traité franco-britannique de Lancaster House, une première évaluation du Watchkeeper a été menée en France en 2012-2013.

En revanche, Airbus Defence and Space n'a pu remettre à temps son offre engageante en raison d'un problème technique avec son partenaire américain, selon nos informations. Le groupe proposait le système Artémis, qui aurait été développé à partir du drone américain Shadow 200 fabriqué par le groupe Textron. Enfin, le groupe israélien IAI (Heron) n'a pas non plus remis d'offre en dépit de sa volonté de s'associer à Latécoère et à d'autres partenaires français.

 

Watchkeeper toujours favori?

Le Watchkeeper a fait longtemps figure de favori. Il a même failli être acheté sans passer par un appel d'offres. Car l'armée de terre, qui a poussé très loin sa coopération avec son homologue britannique sur ce matériel, avait déjà porté son choix sur ce drone. Mais il n'a pas était possible à la DGA de passer un contrat de gré à gré avec le groupe électronique. En dépit d'une étude très poussée des juristes de Thales et du ministère de la Défense, le groupe électronique et l'armée de terre n'ont pu éviter l'appel d'offres. Au grand dam de l'armée de terre et du chef d'état-major Pierre de Villiers, qui voulait absolument fin 2014 le Watcheeper et qui trouvait la décision de la DGA frileuse. Cette procédure pourrait en tout cas éviter in fine tout recours juridique d'un groupe concurrent et repousser la livraison au-delà de 2017 des premiers drones.

Les solutions seront appréciées dans une approche de coût complet prenant en compte tous les aspects de la capacité et notamment les possibilités de mutualisation. C'est un programme "dimensionnant" pour l'armée de terre qui nécessite un "lancement dès 2015" en raison des "obsolescences incompatibles avec le maintien en service du SDTI au-delà de 2017", avait expliqué fin 2014 le chef d'état-major de l'armée de terre, le général Jean-Pierre Bosser. Et ce d'autant que "le financement est programmé", a rappelé le général Bosser, précisant qu'une "approche par les coûts, trois fois inférieurs au MALE, à l'achat et en soutien, me porte à penser que son acquisition est justifiée".

 

Que prévoit la loi de programmation militaire?

Que dit la loi de programmation militaire (LPM) 2014-2019 à propos des drones tactiques ? "La génération actuelle (SDTI) arrivera à obsolescence entre 2015 et 2017 ; de nouveaux systèmes de drones plus récents seront acquis pour disposer d'une quinzaine de vecteurs à l'horizon 2019 (14 exactement, ndlr), sur la trentaine prévue dans le modèle. Une coopération avec le Royaume-Uni est lancée, afin de bénéficier de l'acquis de nos partenaires britanniques et d'inscrire ce programme dans la dynamique des réalisations du traité de Lancaster House (force expéditionnaire interarmées conjointe)". Ce qui aurait dû renforcer les chances du Watchkeeper mais... la plateforme israélienne inquiète certains militaires français.

Partager cet article
Repost0
9 septembre 2015 3 09 /09 /septembre /2015 16:50
Une colonne B-FAST avec un véhicule terrestre ICARUS en tête (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)

Une colonne B-FAST avec un véhicule terrestre ICARUS en tête (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)

 

07/09/2015 Stijn Verboven – - MIL.be

 

ICARUS, tel est le nom du projet de recherche européen visant à développer l'utilisation de drones lors d'opérations de sauvetage. L'École Royale Militaire coordonne les actions des 24 partenaires provenant des 10 pays participants. Afin de démontrer les capacités de ces engins, l'école organisait une grande rencontre à Marche-en-Famenne le 4 septembre dernier.

 

Lors de la démonstration, les collaborateurs ICARUS ont simulé un village dévasté par un fort tremblement de terre. Des survivants nécessitant des secours se trouvent encore dans des immeubles à appartements, des écoles et des fabriques. Une équipe B-FAST, proche du lieu de la catastrophe, se tient prête à intervenir mais l'avion solaire ICARUS reconnaît déjà l'itinéraire. Cet appareil détient le record du monde du vol autonome depuis peu. Il dresse des cartes des environs de manière à ce que l'équipe sache ce que l'on attend d'elle.

 

 (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be) (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be) (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)
 (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be) (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)
 (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be) (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be) (Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)

(Photo Jürgen Braekevelt – MIL.be)

Voici l'une des manières dont les drones ICARUS peuvent aider une équipe de secours mais cela ne s'arrête pas là. Ils détectent également des victimes grâce à leurs caméras thermiques ou dressent des cartes en trois dimensions. Les engins terrestres peuvent ainsi déblayer des décombres, étançonner des bâtiments et travailler dans d'autres constructions trop instables pour les équipes de secours.

 

Le travail de sauvetage n'est pas la tâche principale de la Défense mais selon le chercheur de l'ERM Geert De Cubber, coordinateur du projet, celui-ci présente également des applications militaires intéressantes. « Dans une période où les budgets de la Défense diminuent, ce type de projet est indispensable à l'obtention de financements complémentaires », explique-t-il. Nous œuvrons dans un domaine proche des préoccupations de la Défense. Nos drones peuvent rechercher des victimes ou des ennemis également. Ils peuvent rendre des services dans la protection d'installations par la détection d'intrus. »

 

Le projet ICARUS prendra fin dans quelques mois en janvier 2016. De Cubber est toutefois satisfait des résultats. « La commission européenne voit notre projet promis à un bel avenir », dit-il. « Elle l'utilise comme un projet exemplaire dans lequel les fonds auront été bien investis en débouchant jusqu'à présent sur des applications concrètes. »

Vidéo : Wim Cochet

Partager cet article
Repost0
8 septembre 2015 2 08 /09 /septembre /2015 16:30
photo SOFREP

photo SOFREP

 

September 4, 2015 SOFREP

According to a September 1, 2015, story in the Washington Post that should surprise no one with even a passing knowledge of U.S. counterterrorism efforts over the last fifteen years, it appears the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the military’s Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) are using unmanned aerial vehicles to target and kill Syrian-based leaders of the Islamic terrorist group Islamic State (ISIS, also known as ISIL and IS).

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 septembre 2015 1 07 /09 /septembre /2015 11:50
Hermes 900 HFE photo Armasuisse

Hermes 900 HFE photo Armasuisse

 

07.09.2015  Communication DDPS, Marco Zwahlen

 

Après le Conseil national, le Conseil des Etats s’est prononcé à son tour en faveur du programme d’armement 2015 à hauteur de 542 millions de francs. Ce dernier prévoit le remplacement de trois systèmes qui arrivent à la fin de leur durée d’utilisation. Il est prévu d’acquérir six nouveaux drones de reconnaissance, des nouveaux simulateurs de tir pour fusil d’assaut 90 et 879 véhicules légers tout-terrain pour systèmes techniques.


En juin dernier, le Conseil national avait adopté le programme d’armement 2015 par 130 voix contre 55 et une abstention. Le Conseil des Etats lui emboîte maintenant le pas, par 31 voix contre 9 et 5 abstentions. La proposition de la gauche parlementaire de renoncer à l’acquisition de nouveaux drones de reconnaissance a été clairement rejetée. La minorité motivait sa demande en invoquant les trop nombreuses incertitudes d’ordre éthique, politique et pratique. Le ministre de la défense Ueli Maurer a argumenté qu’une acquisition en Israël ne va pas à l’encontre du droit international public, bien que le pays soit impliqué dans un conflit armé. Il a ajouté que la sécurité est un élément primordial pour un pays. Ces drones de reconnaissance nous permettent de combler une lacune qui existe depuis un certain temps. Cela sert la protection de la population suisse.

 

Acquisitions

Le système de drones de reconnaissance 95 de type Ranger est en service depuis une vingtaine d’années. Il est dépassé et les pièces de rechange ne peuvent plus être achetées. Une évaluation approfondie préconise l’acquisition du système de drones de reconnaissance non armés Hermes 900 HFE construit par Elbit Systems. Quant au simulateur de tir pour fusil d’assaut 90, il est en service depuis 1993. Les coûts d’entretien augmentent et les pièces de rechange ne peuvent également plus être achetées. Il est prévu de le remplacer par un simulateur de tir de nouvelle technologie. Par ailleurs, le Conseil fédéral entend remplacer l’actuel véhicule pour systèmes Steyr-Daimler-Puch 230 GE par le véhicule léger tout-terrain pour systèmes techniques, développé à partir du châssis du Mercedes-Benz G 300 CDI 4x4. Les coûts de maintenance et de réparation de ces véhicules, acquis il y a 25 ans, dépassent en effet les limites économiquement admissibles.
 

Programme d'armement 2015

Partager cet article
Repost0
7 septembre 2015 1 07 /09 /septembre /2015 11:50
Watchkeeper - photo Thales Group

Watchkeeper - photo Thales Group

 

7 septembre 2015 Aerobuzz.fr

 

A l’occasion du salon international de la défense et de la sécurité MSPO qui se tient à Kielce du 1er au 4 septembre, l’industriel polonais WB Electronics et Thales ont dévoilé leur système de drone tactique répondant aux exigences du programme Gryf (Griffon). Développé conjointement, ce drone tactique offre des capacités conformes aux besoins du programme de défense polonais en termes de système armé, dans le cadre d’une collaboration étroite avec l’industrie locale.

 

Basée sur le système Watchkeeper fourni aux forces britanniques, un drone non armé qui a démontré son potentiel sur les théâtres d’opération, la solution proposée par WB Electronics et Thales intègre sur une seule plateforme des fonctionnalités de surveillance et les capacités de frappe du missile léger multirôle FreeFall LMM conçu par Thales.

Partager cet article
Repost0
1 septembre 2015 2 01 /09 /septembre /2015 16:50
nEuron - photo Alenia Aermacchi

nEuron - photo Alenia Aermacchi

 

25 August, 2015 by Beth Stevenson -FG

 

Italy has completed its share of testing of the pan-European Neuron unmanned combat air vehicle, which saw it carry out 12 sorties from Decimomannu air base in Sardinia.

 

Announced by Italian industry lead Alenia Aermacchi on 25 August, the time in Sardinia allowed for flight testing of the UCAV’s stealth characteristics at different altitudes and with different flight profiles, having met “all established goals”. “The 12 highly sensitive sorties have allowed [us] to verify the characteristics of Neuron’s combat capability, its low radar-cross section and low infrared signature, during missions flown at different altitudes and flight profiles and against both ground-based and air radar ‘threats’, using in this latter case, a Eurofighter Typhoon,” Alenia says. “During the deployment in Italy, the Neuron has confirmed its already ascertained excellent performance and high operational reliability.” The UCAV demonstrator will now move to Sweden, where Saab will be the industrial lead during the testing at Vidsel air base, where low observability trials will take place, as well as weapon delivery testing from the aircraft’s weapons bay.

 

Read full article

Partager cet article
Repost0
31 août 2015 1 31 /08 /août /2015 11:20
photo USAF

photo USAF

 

August 30, 2015 by David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen

 

North Dakota has become the first state to legalize police use of armed drones, according to various news outlets.

The law stipulates that the weapons must be of a “less than lethal” type such as tear gas, tasers or rubber bullets.

Republican state Rep. Rick Becker, who sponsored the bill, said he wasn’t thrilled how the law turned out. “In my opinion there should be a nice, red line: Drones should not be weaponized. Period,” Becker said. He was cited in a recent article by the news outlet The Daily Beast.

 

Read the full article here.

 

Partager cet article
Repost0
31 juillet 2015 5 31 /07 /juillet /2015 07:20
The Ikhana UAS - photo NASA

The Ikhana UAS - photo NASA

 

Jul 22, 2015 by Krishnan Haridasan for SatCom Frontier (SPX)

 

Bethesda MD - The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is rising rapidly worldwide. Long known only for their military applications, UAS are increasingly being deployed by civilian governments for use in scientific research, climate change research, and humanitarian relief operations.

 

As detailed in a recent article from Northern Sky Research, the number of UAS dedicated to civilian applications is expected to triple by 2023. The U.S. leads the world in civilian government use of UAS. For example, NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center operates a Northrop Grumman Global Hawk for high-altitude, long-duration Earth science missions. The Global Hawk has contributed greatly to NASA's study of climate change due to its unique ability to operate in the upper stratosphere.

 

NASA's Science Mission Directorate has teamed with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of Energy to use the Global Hawk for Earth observation research. Initial operational capability for Global Hawk science missions began in 2010.

 

A portable ground control station is functioning and has supported operations originating outside the continental United States. A permanent ground control station located at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, was used to support the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel multi-year study from 2012 - 2014 over the Atlantic Ocean. Future hurricane studies in partnership with NOAA are planned in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans using the Global Hawk.

 

As detailed in Fast Company magazine, NASA also uses a General Atomics Predator UAS christened Ikhana, to track forest fires and also to test tracking technology that will eventually allow UAS to share the skies with conventional aircraft.

 

The ability of UAS to autonomously fly long distances, remain aloft for extended periods of time, and carry large payloads brings a new capability to the science community. The unmanned vehicles are effective for measuring, monitoring and observing remote locations of Earth not feasible or practical with piloted aircraft, most other robotic or remotely operated aircraft, or space satellites. The use of UAS to facilitate communications to underserved regions around the world is also anticipated to be a strong growth area.

 

According to NSR: "The use of UAS for communication relay is well understood, and architectural studies have been conducted for integrating stratospheric UAS with LEO and GEO communication satellites for localized high quality service. Despite none of these studies leading to implementation, the announcements and investment by Internet companies such as Facebook and Google in High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) UAS for data connectivity globally has generated renewed interest in this concept."

 

Clearly UAS are incredibly versatile machines that deliver benefits far beyond their use in national defense. As their civilian government and commercial use continues to expand, they will improve the lives of millions of people around the globe.

Partager cet article
Repost0
28 juillet 2015 2 28 /07 /juillet /2015 05:55
Drop n’ Drone photo  Airborne Concept

Drop n’ Drone photo Airborne Concept

 

- Par

 

 

Depuis leur apparition, les drones partent systématiquement en opération depuis le sol. Et bien plus pour très longtemps. Voici « Drop n’ Drone » mis au point par la Start-Up Airborne Concept. Un drone capable d’être largué à 4000 mètres d’altitude depuis un avion ou un hélicoptère grâce notamment à une rotation automatique de l’aile. Arnaud Le Maout, Président d’Airborne Concept : « Sa position initiale est quasiment tubulaire de manière à éviter qu’il prenne de l’incidence et qu’il puisse heurter l’empennage de l’avion par exemple. Et une fois qu’il est en descente stabilisée, il y a une rotation automatique de l’aile qui libère le parachute stabilisateur. Le démarrage des moteurs se fait alors instantanément et ensuite il part faire sa mission. » Et pour l’atterrissage c’est un deuxième parachute qui se déploie.

 

 

Suite de l'article

 

Partager cet article
Repost0
23 juillet 2015 4 23 /07 /juillet /2015 16:58
photo Dassault Aviation

photo Dassault Aviation

 

23.07.2015 par Michel Cabirol - LaTribune.fr
 

Le PDG de Dassault Aviation Eric Trappier estime que la préparation du futur est complètement délaissée, notamment par les armées. Il appelle à une mobilisation des industriels, des armées et de la DGA.

 

C'est un coup de gueule qui est passé inaperçu début juin. Un coup de gueule salutaire du président du comité défense du Conseil des industries de défense (CIDEF), Eric Trappier, également PDG de Dassault Aviation, qui juge que la préparation du futur dans la défense est actuellement complètement délaissée par le ministère de la Défense au profit du court terme, la loi de programmation militaire (LPM). Ce qui est, selon lui, "inquiétant" .

"Nos armées et l'ensemble de la profession de défense sont exclusivement mobilisés sur leurs tableurs Excel - c'est la LPM ! Je vois peu de penseurs préparer le futur, non que les militaires n'aient pas envie de s'y consacrer, mais leur préoccupation du jour est telle qu'elle en devient pour eux inhibante. C'est inquiétant", a-t-il expliqué début juin aux députés de la commission de la Défense.

Pour Eric Trappier, "un important travail de préparation reste à effectuer en même temps que les mentalités doivent changer, de façon à être capable de répondre à des questions comme celle de savoir, par exemple, si les avions de combat de demain devront aller dans l'espace". Pour lancer de nouveaux programmes, le PDG de Dassault Aviation préconise "de retrouver des méthodes de coopération pragmatique sur des besoins communs, qui permettraient, pourvu que les états-majors se soient consultés et aient élaboré des fiches-programmes ou des fiches de besoins opérationnels communs, de lancer des programmes européens".

 

Mobilisation des industriels, de la DGA et des états-majors

Pourquoi une telle inquiétude? Parce que pour Eric Trappier, il est important de préparer la guerre du futur à horizon 20 ans. "La DGA pense en termes de technologie mais quand on prépare l'avenir à vingt ans, on a besoin de confronter les savoir-faire technologiques, et il faudra bien discuter avec les états-majors pour savoir ce que sera la guerre de demain", estime-t-il. Il appelle donc à une "mobilisation des industriels, de la DGA et des états-majors". Notamment des armées. Elles doivent "s'intéresser au futur, quitte à détacher des personnels à cette fin. C'est fondamental si la France veut rester au bon niveau de développement des technologies et des produits".

Eric Trappier regrette par ailleurs que "la boucle entre état-major des armées, état-major de telle ou telle arme, DGA et industriels est un peu longue et la circulation lente, car on ne veut pas donner à ces derniers l'idée de lancer des programmes alors qu'il n'y a pas d'argent. Seulement, à suivre cette logique, on finit par ne plus rien lancer" au niveau national comme programme. Et ce en dépit du programme 144 du ministère de la Défense, "Environnement et prospective de la politique de défense", qui doit y contribuer.

 

Des retards dans les drones

Le PDG de Dassault Aviation rappelle que la France accuse "par exemple, du retard dans le domaine des drones dont la technologie a davantage été mise en valeur" par Israël et les États-Unis qui en ont très rapidement compris leur utilité. Pour Eric Trappier, "il faut donc rattraper notre retard en matière de drones de combat - c'est l'objet du démonstrateur Neuron mais il ne s'agit que d'un démonstrateur". Il constate une "première prise de conscience de ce que les technologies de demain peuvent apporter en matière de guerre aérienne".

C'est pour cela que Dassault Aviation et BAE Systems et d'autres industriels (Rolls Royce, Safran, Thales, Selex UK) sont en train de développer le programme franco-britannique FCAS-DP. Par ailleurs, la France, rappelle-t-il, se rapproche de l'Allemagne et de l'Italie pour ce qui est des drones de surveillance "afin de préparer, pour les années 2020, non pas un Reaper bis mais l'après-Reaper".

"Tâchons d'agir en ce sens au plan européen, à condition, de grâce ! Que cette Europe se montre pragmatique, contrairement à ce qu'elle fait aujourd'hui en annonçant des choses qu'elle ne fait pas - tout au moins en matière de défense. Que les États qui souhaitent coopérer élaborent une fiche programme commune, nous trouverons toujours les moyens, ensuite, nous industriels, de coopérer - même Dassault et Airbus le peuvent, c'est vous dire !

Dans le domaine de la patrouille militaire, le programme PATMAR 2030 "ne vise pas forcément à remplacer l'ATL2 mais à concevoir la patrouille maritime de demain". Et d'expliquer que la mission de surveillance peut "très certainement être accomplie par des drones qui tourneraient 24 heures sur 24" tandis que des avions d'armes interviendraient très rapidement pour traiter les menaces sous-marines ou de surface.

 

Pour un maintien de l'effort dans la R&T

Les industriels réaffirment "l'impérieuse nécessité du maintien de l'effort en matière de recherche et technologie (R&T), si l'on veut financer les programmes au-delà de 2019", souligne Eric Trappier. Et de rappeler que "la sanctuarisation du programme 144 (recherche amont, ndlr) est plus que jamais nécessaire".

"Les discussions en cours sur la création d'un éventuel dispositif de financement de la recherche de défense au niveau européen ne doivent pas faire oublier que nous sommes quasiment seuls en Europe à assumer un effort important en matière de défense. La remontée de l'effort budgétaire observée depuis 2014 chez certains de nos partenaires européens ne doit pas masquer le recul régulier des budgets d'investissement depuis près de dix ans. Il leur faudra des années avant de revenir à un niveau acceptable. Les sommes versées au fonds de la Commission européenne ne doivent pas être compensées par une baisse en France, sous peine d'avoir des soucis en matière de R&T".

Partager cet article
Repost0
4 juillet 2015 6 04 /07 /juillet /2015 11:55
photo Armée de l'Air

photo Armée de l'Air

 

02.07.2015 par Jean Esparbès, étudiant à Sciences Po Lille et qui réalise actuellement un stage à La Voix du Nord et au blog Défense globale
 

Pour prolonger l'interview sur l'éthique du drone (lire ici), tentons d'aller un cran plus loin, au-delà de la doctrine actuelle de la France qui se refuse à armer ses trois drones MALE (moyenne altitude longue endurance). Jusqu'ici, l'usage intensif (5 000 heures de vol en un an et demi pour l'opération Barkhane) se cantonne aux missions de reconnaissance. L'efficacité opérationnelle ne commandera-t-elle pas rapidement d'armer les drones ?

La réflexion avance avec Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer, chargé de mission « affaires transversales et sécurité » au Centre d’Analyse, de Prévision et de Stratégie (CAPS) du ministère des Affaires étrangères, notamment sur les drones armés. Il partage la position des nombreux opérationnels souhaitent en tirer pleinement parti, et donc de les armer. Il s’exprime ici en son nom : ses propos n’engagent aucunement le ministère des Affaires étrangères.

 

Un rapport de force en faveur de l’armement des drones

Dans son article « Quand la France armera ses drones », publié dans Les Cahiers de la Revue Défense Nationale, deux arguments prédominent. L'attrait opérationnel de l'armement des drones « serait un gain de ressources ». Aujourd’hui, toutes les frappes de Mirage 2000-D résultent d’une surveillance de drone. Le drone armé permettrait de libérer un avion de chasse pour une autre mission. Il serait un démultiplicateur de forces.

L’autre avantage est l'endurance, donc la permanence. Un Reaper peut assurer une présence pendant vingt-quatre heures au-dessus d’une zone, contrairement au chasseur qui ne fait que passer. Cette permanence offre le choix du moment pour frapper. On accroît ainsi la discrimination et diminue le risque de victimes civiles. Le dilemme s’est déjà présenté. « Quand la cible est mouvante, si elle est dans le désert ça va, si une heure plus tard elle est en ville, qu’est-ce que vous faites lorsque votre avion arrive ? »

 

Armement et souveraineté

Maintenant, avec quoi les armer ? Les missiles Hellfire des hélicoptères Tigre HAD sont une option. Reste que les drones MQ-9 Reaper de General Atomics sont une technologie américaine. Le renseignement américain (la NSA comme d’autres) emploie tous les leviers à sa disposition, ce qui augure des problèmes de souveraineté. Par ailleurs, ils ont été prélevés sur des exemplaires produits pour l’US Air Force. Le concours de General Atomics sera donc nécessaire pour les modifier.

Se pose ensuite la question de l’emploi. Qu’est-ce qui, vu du ciel, différencie un véhicule de djihadistes de celui de trafiquants ou de rebelles se jouant des frontières des Etats du Sahel ? Rien. La réalisation de « Signature Strikes » (frappes basées sur le comportement), comme le fit la CIA au Pakistan ou au Yémen, semble à exclure. La validation des cibles par du renseignement venant d’autres sources (troupes au sol, services de renseignement) est plus sage et conforme à la doctrine française.

Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer rappelle également qu'« il y a un débat sur l’efficacité : les frappes de drones réduisent-elles ou augmentent-elles la menace ? Un usage industriel des Signatures Strikes, par exemple, peut se retourner en formidable outil de recrutement, pour les proches des victimes qui crient vengeance et dans la propagande qui utilise abondamment ce genre de récits. Cela incite à la plus grande prudence et à un usage parcimonieux de cet outil ».

Il recommande plutôt une doctrine restrictive d’élimination ciblée. Celle-ci se concentrerait sur « des cibles de haute valeur, posant une menace imminente et démontrable à la sécurité nationale, lorsque l’État sur le territoire duquel elles se trouvent n’a pas la volonté ou la capacité de supprimer la menace ».

 

Des militaires divisés entre terriens et aviateurs

Une double résistance à l'armement des drones existe. L'opinion publique, informée par les ONG sur les abus américains, est sensible à une vision négative. Plus surprenant, l'armée française serait, elle aussi, divisée sur la question. Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer rappelle qu’une fraction des militaires est attachée à la conception selon laquelle le risque physique reste l’étalon de la valeur du soldat. Il ne faut pas sous-estimer « cette différence de culture entre les armées de l’air et de terre, entre ceux qui considèrent que faire la guerre à distance n’est pas un problème éthique, et ceux qui considèrent que c’en est un ». Le débat est ouvert.

Partager cet article
Repost0
2 juillet 2015 4 02 /07 /juillet /2015 16:55
photo Armée de l'Air

photo Armée de l'Air

 

June 16, 2015: Strategy Page

 

France recently received its third American RQ-9 Reaper UAV. The first two were ordered in 2013 and in service by early 2014. Pleased with Reaper performance France has ordered a dozen and expects all of them to be in service by 2019.

 

Back in 2013 France decided that its locally developed Harfang UAV was not sufficient and decided to try out the Reaper. As expected the Reaper performed as well as other NATO users had reported and soon the initial order was increased to twelve. In 2013 two Harfang UAVs were in Mali (operating from neighboring Niger) and some American RQ-9s are helping out as well. France wanted the RQ-9s as quickly as possible and apparently this sale was dependent on the U.S. being able to deliver the RQ-9s before the end of 2013. That was accomplished and the two French reapers were in service by January and were soon in Africa.

 

The MQ-9 Reaper is a 4.7 ton, 11.6 meter (36 foot) long aircraft, with a 21.3 meter (66 foot) wingspan that looks like the MQ-1 Predator. It has six hard points and can carry 682 kg (1,500 pounds) of weapons. These include Hellfire missiles (up to eight), two Sidewinder or two AMRAAM air-to-air missiles, two Maverick missiles, or two 227 kg (500 pound) smart bombs (laser or GPS guided). Max speed is 400 kilometers an hour and max endurance is 15 hours. The Reaper is considered a combat aircraft, to replace F-16s or A-10s in many situations.

 

The Harfang was based on the Israeli Heron Shoval UAV, which in turn is very similar to the MQ-1 and is selling well to foreign customers who cannot obtain the MQ-1. In addition to being one of the primary UAVs for many armed forces (Israel, India, Turkey, Russia, France, Brazil, El Salvador), the United States, Canada, and Australia have either bought, leased, or licensed manufacture of the Heron. France bought four Harfang ("Eagle") UAVs and used them in Afghanistan, Libya, and Mali since 2009.

 

The Shoval weighs about the same (1.2 tons) as the Predator and has similar endurance (40 hours). Shoval has a slightly higher ceiling (10 kilometers/30,000 feet, versus 8 kilometers) and software which allows it to automatically take off, carry out a mission, and land automatically. Not all American large UAVs can do this. Both Predator and Shoval cost about the same ($5 million), although the Israelis are willing to be more flexible on price. Shoval does have a larger wingspan (16.5 meters/51 feet) than the Predator (13.2 meters/41 feet) and a payload of about 137 kg (300 pounds). The French version costs about $25 million each (including sensors and development costs).

 

Israel also developed a larger version of the Heron, the 4.6 ton Heron TP. This is similar to the American RQ-9, but with a lot less combat experience and more expensive. Some Heron TP tech was incorporated into Harfang and France was going to buy some Heron TPs, even though MQ-9s were offered for more than 20 percent less. France analyzed the situation and decided to switch to the RQ-9 because they are seen as more reliable and capable as well as possessing lots of combat experience.

 

The Heron TP entered squadron service in the Israeli Air Force four years ago. The UAV's first combat service was three years ago, when it was used off the coast of Gaza, keeping an eye on ships seeking to run the blockade. For that kind of work the aircraft was well suited. But so are smaller and cheaper UAVs. Development of the Heron TP was largely completed in 2006, mainly for the export market, and the Israeli military was in no rush to buy it. There have been some export sales and the Israeli air force eventually realized that this was an ideal UAV for long range operations or for maritime patrol. But it turned out there were few missions like that. Equipped with a powerful (1,200 horsepower) turboprop engine, the Heron TP can operate at 14,500 meters (45,000 feet). That is above commercial air traffic and all the air-traffic-control regulations that discourage, and often forbid, UAVs fly at the same altitude as commercial aircraft. The Heron TP has a one ton payload, enabling it to carry sensors that can give a detailed view of what's on the ground, even from that high up. The endurance of 36 hours makes the Heron TP a competitor for the U.S. MQ-9. The big difference between the two is that the Reaper is designed to be a combat aircraft, operating at a lower altitude, with less endurance, and able to carry a ton of smart bombs or missiles. Heron TP is meant mainly for reconnaissance and surveillance, and Israel wants to keep a closer, and more persistent, eye on Syria and southern Lebanon. But the Heron TP has since been rigged to carry a wide variety of missiles and smart bombs.

Partager cet article
Repost0
1 juillet 2015 3 01 /07 /juillet /2015 12:56
photo Aqui.fr

photo Aqui.fr


25.06.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

Le ministère de l'Intérieur vient de lancer un appel d'offres pour la "fournitures de micro-drones au profit de la Gendarmerie Nationale, maintien en condition opérationnelle des micro-drones acquis et formation pour la fonction de télé-pilote". Cet appel d'offres est à consulter ici.

L'avis précise que "chaque micro-drone est un système d'aéronef sans pilote de type quadri-rotor à décollage vertical, de taille réduite et compacte, facilement transportable et très discret. Chaque système est équipé d'un vecteur aérien, d'une station de réception et de visualisation sol et d'un moyen de transport et de stockage. Les spécificités techniques propre à chaque lot sont précisées au cahier des charges techniques particulières (Cctp)."

Combien de drones:
- 4 (max: 6) micro-drones haut de gamme (vitesse, autonomie) ou durci de type VTOL, avec zoom d'au moins X10, pour le lot 1
- 19 (jusqu'à 30) micro-drones grand public pour le lot 2.

Partager cet article
Repost0
1 juillet 2015 3 01 /07 /juillet /2015 10:55
MQ-9 Reaper - photo Armée de l'Air

MQ-9 Reaper - photo Armée de l'Air

 

01/07/2015 par Jean Esparbès, étudiant à Sciences Po Lille et qui réalise actuellement un stage à La Voix du Nord et au blog Défense globale

 

Alors que la France possède sept drones MALE (moyenne altitude longue endurance) et se refuse pour l’heure à les armer, il n’est pas inutile de revenir sur le cadre juridique et éthique de leur emploi. Et sur la probable évolution de la doctrine. Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer est chargé de mission « affaires transversales et sécurité » au Centre d’analyse, de prévision et de stratégie (CAPS) du ministère des Affaires étrangères, où il s’occupe notamment des drones armés. Il s’exprime ici en son nom propre et ses propos n’engagent aucunement le ministère des Affaires étrangères. Prenons donc un peu de hauteur en ce temps caniculaire.

 

A paraître ce jeudi 2 juillet, un second volet au titre intrigant : Et si la France armait ses drones...

 

Lire l’article

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories