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5 juin 2015 5 05 /06 /juin /2015 07:20
USS Virginia (SSN-774) - photo US Navy

USS Virginia (SSN-774) - photo US Navy

 

GROTON, Conn., June 4, 2015 /PRNewswire

 

The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Electric Boat a $6.5 million contract modification to support development of the Virginia Payload Module (VPM). Electric Boat is a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

 

The VPM will comprise four large-diameter payload tubes in a new hull section to be inserted in Virginia-class submarines. The section will extended the hull by 70 to 80 feet and boost strike capacity by 230 percent while increasing the cost by less than 15 percent.

 

This modification is part of an overall engineering contract supporting the Virginia Class Submarine Program. The contract was initially awarded in 2010 and has a potential value of $965 million.

 

More information about General Dynamics is available at www.generaldynamics.com.

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11 mars 2015 3 11 /03 /mars /2015 17:20
PCU Colorado (SSN 788) - photo US Navy

PCU Colorado (SSN 788) - photo US Navy

 

Mar 10, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Navy

 

The U.S. Navy held a keel laying ceremony for the Virginia-class submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Colorado (SSN 788) at General Dynamics Electric Boat, March 7.

 

The initials of the submarine's sponsor, Annie Mabus, were welded onto a steel plate that will be permanently affixed to the submarine. Mabus is the daughter of Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus.

 

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12 août 2014 2 12 /08 /août /2014 07:20
Despite Delays, New US Navy Sub Headed for On-Time Delivery

Pre-Commissioning Unit North Dakota (SSN 784) sits moored at the graving dock of General Dynamics Electric Boat prior to its christening ceremony on Nov. 2 in Groton, Conn. (Lt. j.g. Phillip Chitty / US Navy)

 

Aug. 11, 2014 - By CHRISTOPHER P. CAVAS- Defense News

 

WASHINGTON — The building program of the US Navy’s Virginia-class submarines has an outstanding reputation, both for keeping to cost and for on-time delivery. There’s even a modest competition between the two shipyards that build the subs to see who can shave off more time of the contractual delivery date.

Bets are off, however, for the North Dakota, the 11th and newest unit of the class. The submarine is the first of the Block III version, with the most significant design changes to date — that led to delays that were acknowledged in the spring. The Navy hoped to continue the march of early deliveries and begin the sub’s first round of sea trials in mid-April, but it was apparent more time was needed to resolve a number of problems.

 

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29 janvier 2014 3 29 /01 /janvier /2014 12:20
Navy, Electric Boat Test Tube-Launched Underwater Vehicle

 

January 28, 2014 by Kris Osborn - defensetech.org

 

Groton, Conn. – The Navy and General Dynamics Electric Boat are testing a prototype of a system that would allow the launch and recovery of unmanned underwater vehicles and other payloads  from the missile tube of a cruise missile submarine.

 

Called the Universal Launch and Recovery Module, the system houses, launches and recovers an underwater vehicle, a Lockheed-built 10,000-pound prototype vehicle called Marlin, from the submarine’s missile tube.

 

The system is showing promise in early testing and is slated to go sea aboard a guided missile, nuclear powered submarine (SSGN) next year, Electric Boat officials said.

 

“This is real prototyping to actually go and exercise the system before we put it on an SSGN and take it to sea,” Adm. David Johnson, Program Executive Officer, Submarines, said at the 2013 Naval Submarine League Annual Symposium, Va., in October.

 

The system is designed for a range of potential underwater missions to include counter-mine patrol, sonar or other intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions.

 

“Submarines have the ability to get really close to something. That is a big advantage,” said Franz Edson, director, mission systems & business development, General Dynamics Electric Boat.

 

The prototype vehicle is hooked up to temporary hydraulics and engineered to acquire a buoy at the top of the missile tube using a transponder, said Edson.

 

“It comes out of a tube, rotates, and then deploys. It goes off and does its thing — mine warfare, ISR, etc. –Then it comes back and it mates with that buoy before it is brought back down into the tube,” Edson said.

 

Once a tactical version of the technology is built, it will fill up the launch tube out to 60-inches in diameter and stretch as long as 23-feet, Edson said. The vehicle could weigh up to 30,000-pounds, he added.

 

The prototype vehicle is controlled by two laptop computers, removing the need to adjust the infrastructure of the submarine in order to accommodate the system, Edson explained.

 

“It is a gigantic elevator that will take up to 30,000 pounds and raise it from inside the ship to outside the ship. We’re not modifying the submarine’s infrastructure to control this,” Edson said.

 

In addition to being configured to swim from an SSGN, the system is also being configured by Electric Boat and the Navy to work from the Virginia Payload Modules of Virginia-Class attack submarines to begin construction by 2019, Edson said.

 

Virginia Payload Modules, or VPM, consist of an effort to increase the missile firing capability of Virginia-Class submarines from 12 to 40 vertically fired missiles.

Navy, Electric Boat Test Tube-Launched Underwater Vehicle

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