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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 11:20
Space Fence facility on Kwajalein Island. Photo: Lockheed Martin Corporation

Space Fence facility on Kwajalein Island. Photo: Lockheed Martin Corporation

 

30 September 2015 airforce-technology.com

 

The US Air Force has deemed the design of the Space Fence System developed by Lockheed Martin to be technically mature.

 

The Critical Design Review (CDR) for the next-generation space surveillance system conducted by the government representatives lasted for three days, following which it was indicated that the system will be able to meet all the specified requirements.

 

The Space Fence S-band radar system has been designed to detect, track, and catalog orbital objects in space over 1.5 million times daily in order to predict and prevent space-based collisions.

 

Lockheed Martin had to deliver around 21,000 pages of design documents prior to the CDR and undergo an eight-day design walkthrough in order to ensure that the system meets the performance requirements.

 

The CDR event was conducted with a small-scale demonstration system which was developed with end-item components.

 

Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training vice-president for Advanced Systems Steve Bruce said: "Completion of CDR marks the end of the design phase and the start of radar production and facility construction of the Space Fence system.

"Once complete, Space Fence will deliver revolutionary capability to the US Air Force with a flexible system capable of adapting to future missions requiring new tracking and coverage approaches."

 

"Once complete, Space Fence will deliver revolutionary capability to the US Air Force with a flexible system capable of adapting to future missions requiring new tracking and coverage approaches.

 

"We look forward to continuing our successful partnerships with the US Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, Life-Cycle Management Center and Space Command."

 

The firm has used the latest monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology, including Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductor materials, for the Space Fence radar open architecture design.

 

GaN can deliver multiple advantages to active phased array radar systems, which includes higher power density, improved efficiency and better reliability than previous technologies.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
Le Caracal sur le stand Airbus à MSPO 2015 photo Airbus HC

Le Caracal sur le stand Airbus à MSPO 2015 photo Airbus HC

 

29/09/15 lesechos.fr ( Reuters)

 

GLIWICE, Pologne - La Pologne ne signera probablement pas avant les élections législatives du 25 octobre un contrat de trois milliards de dollars (2,7 milliards d'euros) avec Airbus Helicopters sur la fourniture de 50 hélicoptères à l'armée polonaise, a déclaré mardi le vice-Premier ministre, Janusz Piechocinski.

 

Favori du scrutin, le parti d'opposition Droit et Justice (PiS) a prévenu lundi qu'il bloquerait la signature de ce contrat s'il parvenait au pouvoir.

 

Antoni Macierewicz, vice-président du PiS, juge l'hélicoptère H225M Caracal d'Airbus dépassé et il ajoute que l'industrie de la défense polonaise ne tirera aucun profit de ce marché parce qu'elle en perdra des emplois.

 

"De mon point de vue, il est impossible que ce contrat (..) soit préparé dans le mois qui nous sépare des élections", a dit à Reuters Janusz Piechocinski, qui est également ministre de l'Economie, faisant référence à la partie du marché qui est négociée par son ministère.

 

PiS a dit à plusieurs reprises qu'il souhaiterait voir le contrat attribué à des sociétés qui produisent localement.

 

Le ministère polonais de la Défense avait choisi en avril de négocier avec la filiale d'Airbus Group pour ce contrat, au détriment de l'américain Sikorsky et de l'italien AgustaWestland.

 

Ces derniers ont implanté des sites en Pologne.

 

Airbus Helicopters avait dit en avril qu'il comptait embaucher directement 1.250 personnes en Pologne d'ici 2020 et créer en outre 2.000 emplois dans le secteur en lien avec ce marché.

 

Airbus n'a pas répond aux sollicitations de commentaires dans l'immédiat.

 

Le gouvernement polonais, dominé par le parti Plateforme civique (PO) depuis 2007, s'est lancé dans un vaste programme de modernisation de l'armée nationale.

 

A partir de 2016, la première économie d'Europe de l'est, veut porter le budget de la Défense à 2% du PIB contre 1,95% garanti actuellement.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
G36 A2 mit RSA-S Visier, LLM01 und Sturmgriff (Quelle Heer-Alexander Schöffner)

G36 A2 mit RSA-S Visier, LLM01 und Sturmgriff (Quelle Heer-Alexander Schöffner)

 

September 18, 2015: Strategy Page

 

In mid-2015 Lithuania temporarily suspended purchases of German G36 assault rifles because a recent German Army study concluded that the G36 was unreliable during sustained combat, especially in hot weather.  Lithuania has been using the G36 since 2005 and their current G36 contract is worth about $14 million. Lithuanian soldiers had been satisfied with G36s. That was largely because the heat problems were never noticed because the troops typically used the G36 for training (typical single or short burst fire) and often in cold European weather.

 

In early 2015 the German Amy issued a report that admitted, after years of user complaints and several rounds of testing, that there were major accuracy and reliability problems with its G36 assault rifle. The G36 is a 3.3 kg (7.3 pound), 999mm (39 inch) long (758mm with stock folded) 5.56mm assault rifle. Effective range is 800 meters and it can use a 30 or 100 round magazine and was designed to be an improvement on the M16 design from the 1960s. On paper the G36 was a success but in combat it was not. This was particularly true in Afghanistan. While the G36 entered service in 1995 it didn’t get exposed to heavy combat use until 2008 and that’s when the complaints from the troops began.

 

The main problem was that the G36 suffers accuracy and reliability problems when the barrel gets very hot. This tends to happen when the rifle fires a lot of rounds in a short period and is worse in areas where the outdoor temperatures are very hot to begin with. This was a common situation in Afghanistan. In 2014 despite formal investigations and test results that backed up the complaints of the troops the German government ordered one last round of tests and a temporary halt in purchases of G36s. The results of those tests confirmed earlier results and the G36 was said to have no future in the German military. That admits the problem but does not solve it.

 

Although German troops went to Afghanistan in 2002, they were deliberately kept away from combat for several years. But by 2008 German troops were regularly fighting the Taliban and experiencing extended firefights during the warm weather. At that point the troops encountered the previously unknown G36 flaws. There were incidents where hours of combat caused several very obvious problems. One of the more obvious culprits was the polymer (plastic) parts of the rifle getting a bit soft when the metal parts got very hot due to heavy use in a short period of time. The barrel and receiver could move a tiny bit under those conditions and that threw off accuracy to a small degree that became especially noticeable only at longer (over 200 meters) ranges. It was later discovered that the manufacturer had not been using the right type of plastic for the rifle and the cheaper substitute was more prone to failure in high-heat conditions.

 

By 2012 it was also discovered that there were no practical (workable and affordable) solutions. At first the German government insisted the problem had to do with bad ammunition. The ammo manufacturers denied that and were able to make a convincing case. Meanwhile the complaints from the troops, confirmed by many witnesses and cell phone photos, of the heat related problems and total failure of the rifle in some cases kept showing up in the media. German politicians and procurement officials initially responded by trying to make all this go away. The government officials did not want to admit they made a major mistake in putting the G36 into service. They also don’t want the major expense of replacing the G36 with a better design.

 

The G36 was initially very popular as the standard German infantry assault rifle. By 1997 in was widely used and troops appreciated the fact that it used a short-stroke piston system. The M16s uses gas-tube system, which results in carbon being blown back into the chamber. That leads to carbon build up, which results in jams (rounds getting stuck in the chamber, and the weapon unable to fire.). The short-stroke system also does not expose parts of the rifle to extremely hot gases (which wears out components more quickly). As a result, rifles using the short-stroke system, rather than the gas-tube, are more reliable, easier to maintain and last longer. That was the good news. The bad news stayed hidden for a decade.

 

The G-36 assault rifle had been created in the early 1990s as the successor to the outdated G3 rifle which was incompatible with the current NATO standards. The new 5.56mm assault rifle has been adopted by the Bundeswehr in the 1995 and achieved some export success. The rifle is made mostly from reinforced composites. Thanks to this it is very light.  The lightest version weighs only 2.8 kilograms and the heaviest variant is only 3.6 kilograms.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
Bulgarian Air Force MiG-29 Fulcrum aircraft - photo USAF

Bulgarian Air Force MiG-29 Fulcrum aircraft - photo USAF

 

September 26, 2015: Strategy Page

 

Bulgaria has hired a Polish firm to upgrade six of their MiG-29 fighters. Poland was selected because in 2014 Poland completed upgrades required to make their own MiG-29s compatible with NATO standards. This was necessary because Poland is now a member of NATO and could not afford to replace its MiG-29s with Western fighters. Poland has the largest fleet of MiG-29s in NATO (32 operational) and other East European nations that recently joined NATO are in a similar situation.

 

The Poles didn’t do it all themselves but figured out who the most effective partners would be. Thus a Polish firm worked with an Israeli company to make the MiG-29 electronics compatible with NATO equipment. Mechanical controls were replaced with electronic (“fly by wire”) ones. This involved a much more efficient cockpit and some amenities which make life much easier for pilots. All this gave the MiG-29 electronics similar to those in the 48 F-16s Poland has purchased.

 

The Bulgarian upgrades are less about new electronics and more about keeping the Bulgarian MiG-29s flyable. This being done despite protests from Russia who insist it is illegal for anyone but the Russian manufacturer to perform such upgrades and refurbishment. But the Russians want a lot more money for the work than Polish, or even Western European firms can do it for. Moreover the current Russian hostility towards NATO does not make Russia a reliable source of such services.

 

Bulgaria has to be careful with what it spends on military equipment because the country was never rich to begin with. After Bulgaria broke free from communist (and Russian dominated) government in 1989 it turned to the West for help. Reforms (and reducing the chronic corruption) took time. Thus it wasn’t until 2009 that Bulgaria was able to resume training new MiG-29 pilots. Such training had stopped, for budgetary reasons, in the late 1990s. Throughout the 1990s, and until 2004, Bulgaria was busy disbanding its Cold War era air force of 226 aircraft. By 2009 all they had left was 18 MiG-29s (which needed upgrades to meet NATO standards), some Su-25s (for ground attack), a few MiG-21s (on their way out), some Su-22s (used for reconnaissance) and a few dozen transports and helicopters. One by one, most air bases were shut down, and the Russian made aircraft (most of them obsolete) sold for scrap.

 

Western aircraft are being bought, but the MiG-29s are being kept because they are competitive with Western fighters. That is important because East European nations found that Western warplanes were too expensive. Meanwhile by 2009 the existing MiG-29 pilots were getting old and many of them had already left for more lucrative commercial flying job. Thus the need for another dozen MiG-29 pilots. That training was completed by 2010.

 

In late 2011 Bulgaria announced that it would postpone a decision on the purchase of a new multi-role jet fighter until at least 2012. Bulgaria originally committed itself to buying a NATO-type fighter as part of its alliance integration process. However, the economic recession cut into procurement funds and that situation never got better. Soon plans for buying Western warplanes was dropped as well. Then the Poles showed it was possible to upgrade MiG-29s on an East European budget.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:40
 source War is boring

source War is boring

 

September 28, 2015 Robert Beckhusen  - War is Boring

 

In a far-off future war, an infantry platoon awaits a Russian assault.

The defending soldiers are in a fortified position on elevated ground or a reverse slope. They’ve arranged machine guns and anti-tank weapons to kill anything that comes into view. They’ve dug into the ground to help them survive the initial artillery barrage. To bolster their defenses even more, they’ve covered the area in front of them with mines.

If the Russian assault force was human, then it’d probably be too dangerous to go ahead with the attack. But it’s not. Over the horizon comes a mix of mostly-robotic vehicles — and the NATO troops don’t have much of a chance.

That’s science fiction, but a future scenario like that one recently appeared in the pages of Russian defense trade newspaper Military-Industrial Courier. It’s an interesting idea, and the article is notable for its realistic depiction of combat robots used on a relatively large scale. But the concept has a few problems.

 

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
Afghan Army to receive additional Commando Select vehicles from Textron

 

30 September 2015 army-technology.com

 

Textron Systems Marine & Land Systems has received a contract to supply additional Commando Select four-wheeled armoured vehicles to the Afghan National Army (ANA).

 

Awarded by the US Army Contracting Command, the $56.2m firm-fixed-price contract covers the delivery of 55 more Commando Select vehicles to ANA through the US Army foreign military sales process. The vehicles will be configured in three variants, with 36 equipped with objective gunner protection kits, 15 with enclosed 40mm / .50 calibre turrets, and four ambulance vehicles. Known as mobile strike force vehicles (MSFV) by the Afghan Army, the vehicles are scheduled to be deployed in support of security operations across the country. The ANA has been operating more than 630 MSFVs since 2012.

Read more

 

 

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
UCAV Burraq launching the laser-guided missile Burq

UCAV Burraq launching the laser-guided missile Burq

 

September 27, 2015: Strategy Page

 

On September 7th a Pakistani UAV used laser guided missiles to kill three Islamic terrorists in North Waziristan. This was a first for Pakistan. While Pakistan has officially condemned and opposed similar strikes by American UAVs in North Waziristan, it never banned the American use of armed UAVs in certain parts of Pakistan. The U.S. refused to sell Pakistan UAVs that could carry laser guided missiles, mainly because the Americans don’t trust Pakistan. So Pakistan went looking for other suppliers and eventually bought a similar UAV (the CH-2) from China in 2009. Pakistan was soon producing a local version, Burraq. The earliest CH-2 models were unarmed, but the latest version (CH-3A) can carry a max payload of 180 kg for six hours. China supplies two missiles similar to the American Hellfire. One of these, the laser guided AR-1, weighs 45 kg and has a range of 8,000 meters. This is said to be the one Pakistan is using.

 

Pakistan apparently won’t stop with the Burraq. There is a more advanced armed UAV being offer by China. Called the Wing Loong (that's Chinese for Pterodactyl, a Jurassic period flying dinosaur) this UAV which can be equipped to carry two BA-7 laser guided missiles (similar to the Hellfire) or two 60 kg (110 pound) GPS guided bombs (similar to the U.S. SDB). This UAV has been around for a while but it has taken time to get it working reliably when used to hit targets with laser guided missiles.   Since 2008 Chinese aircraft manufacturer (AVIC) has been showing off photos and videos of a prototype for a clone of the American MQ-1 Predator UAV that tuned out to be Wing Loong. This in 2012 one was seen in flight, over the capital of Uzbekistan, which, along with UAE (United Arab Emirates) were the first export customers. It was later revealed that development on Wing Loong began in 2005, first flight was in 2007 and Chinese troops got the first ones in 2008 for testing under more realistic conditions.

 

While Wing Loong is similar in shape to the larger American MQ-9 Reaper, in size it's almost identical to the 1.2 ton Predator. Wing Loong weighs 1.1 tons, has a 14 meter (46 feet) wingspan, and is 9 meters (28 feet) long. It has max altitude of 5,300 meters (16,400 feet) and an endurance of over 20 hours. Payload is 200 kg. The base price of Wing Loong is about a million dollars. But additional sensors and fire control equipment for one able to use laser guided missiles increases that to several million dollars. That is still about half the price of a similarly equipped Predator. Unlike the United States, which restricts the sale of armed UAVS, China will sell to anyone who can pay, no questions asked. The only problem Pakistan has is a shortage of cash. That’s why Pakistan cooperates at all with the United States; billions of dollars in military aid.

 

For several decades a growing number of Chinese commercial firms have been developing military UAVs. China is quite proud of its thriving commercial UAV industry, which produced a wide range of models. For example in mid-2014 China announced that a civilian UAV, used for mapping and land use surveys, recently stayed in the air for 30 hours, setting a record for Chinese UAVs. The previous record for Chinese UAVs was 16 hours.  This long endurance UAV was developed by a government agency (CASM, or Chinese Academy of Surveying & Mapping) and has limited military use. CASM has developed several small UAVs for survey duties. These UAVs all feature lightweight materials and tend to be under 50 kg (110 pounds) with small payloads (usually 5 kg/11 pounds). These take advantage of new lightweight and powerful cameras to economically monitor Chinese farming and natural resources. Some of these UAVs are also believed to be used by the police and security services.  Export customers are welcome.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
Les atouts de DCNS pour remporter le méga-contrat des sous-marins australiens

 

29 septembre 2015 Par Hassan Meddah - UsineNouvelle

 

Opposé à l’allemand TKMS et à un consortium japonais, le fabricant de navires militaires s’est positionné sur le contrat de renouvellement de la flotte de sous-marins de la Royal Australian Navy. Un contrat qui pourrait atteindre 30 milliards d’euros. DCNS proposera une version conventionnelle du sous-marin nucléaire Barracuda déjà en production pour la marine française.

 

Pour les fabricants de sous-marins, c’est le contrat du siècle. L’Australie a lancé une compétition pour le renouvellement de sa flotte,  de Collins vieillissants de conception suédoise qui devraient quitter le service d’ici 2025. La pays serait prêt à acheter entre 6 à 12 sous-marins pour un montant qui pourrait atteindre 30 milliards d’euros.

Après leur pré-sélection au printemps dernier, seuls trois groupes ont eu l’opportunité de déposer une offre initiale le 18 septembre dernier. Le français DCNS sera ainsi opposé à son rival de toujours, l'allemand ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) et à un consortium japonais regroupant Kawasaki et Mitsubishi.

Les candidats seront départagés selon six critères: le design des sous-marins, leur coût, l’organisation industrielle associée pour les produire, leur maintenance sur trente ans et la capacité d’intégrer un système de combat américain. Enfin le prix sera bien sûr un élément déterminant de l’offre.

La Royal Australian Navy exige un sous-marin de la gamme des 4000 tonnes et plus capable d’opérer de longues missions océaniques. Sur le plan industriel, Canberra n’écarte aucune option : une production "on-shore" (c'est-à-dire locale), "off-shore" (entièrement à l’étranger) ou un mix des deux, où le premier exemplaire pourrait être par exemple produit chez le fournisseur et le reste dans un chantier naval australien. Elle a demandé à chacun des candidats de plancher sur les trois scénarios. Ils doivent remettre leur copie définitive fin novembre. L’Australie sélectionnera ensuite un fournisseur exclusif d’ici le premier semestre 2016 pour des premières livraisons estimées d’ici 2026.

 

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
photo Dassault Aviation

photo Dassault Aviation

 

29-09-2015 Par Challenges.fr

 

Nouvelle étape dans les négociations sur la vente de 36 avions Rafale à l'Inde. Des responsables indiens et français se réunissent aujourd'hui [29 sept.] à New Delhi dans l'espoir d'arriver à un accord.

 

Des responsables des ministères indiens et français de la Défense se retrouvent mardi 29 septembre pour discuter de la vente de 36 avions Rafale à l'Inde, avec l'espoir d'arriver prochainement à un accord, a indiqué un responsable gouvernemental indien. Ces négociations, qui se déroulent à New Delhi, interviennent après que la France a accepté le principe d'investir 50% du montant total du contrat en Inde, affirme le quotidien Economic Times.

Ces discussions "vont conduire l'accord dans sa phase finale", a dit un responsable gouvernemental indien à l'AFP tout en refusant de commenter les engagements sur les investissements. "Si tout se passe bien, un accord de gouvernement à gouvernement sera bientôt signé. Il faudra encore probablement un mois avant la signature de l'accord final", a-t-il dit.

 

Commande de 36 Rafale

Le Premier ministre indien Narendra Modi avait annoncé en avril, lors de sa visite en France, une commande de 36 avions de chasse de Dassault "sur étagère", soit prêts à voler. Le montant estimé est d'environ 5 milliards d'euros. Un point d'achoppement des négociations a été la demande de New Delhi, fréquente dans ses grands contrats d'armement, d'investir une partie du montant du contrat en Inde, selon Economic Times qui ne cite pas de source.

Selon le quotidien, la délégation française est conduite par un haut responsable de la Direction générale de l'armement (DGA), Stéphane Reb. New Delhi avait initialement lancé en 2012 des discussions avec Dassault pour l'achat de 126 Rafale, dont 108 fabriqués en Inde à travers une opération complexe de transfert de technologie.

 

L'Inde, premier importateur mondial de matériel militaire

Devant l'échec de ces discussions, le gouvernement Modi a décidé de revoir ses besoins à la baisse et de négocier avec le gouvernement français et non Dassault.

L'Inde tente d'accélérer la modernisation de ses équipements militaires dans le cadre d'un programme évalué à environ 100 milliards de dollars, afin de répondre aux défis militaires posés par le Pakistan et la Chine. Modi veut en outre que l'Inde abandonne la place de premier importateur mondial de matériel militaire et soit capable de produire 70% de ses équipements d'ici la fin de la décennie.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
CH-47F Chinook helicopter

CH-47F Chinook helicopter


28.09.2015 by Livefist
 

It's a phrase thrown about often in this business, but in the compulsively bumpy world of Indian aviation procurement, there are few occasions when an item chosen for the armed forces is a certain, unequivocal game-changer. The Indian government's decision to clear a deal for 15 Boeing Ch-47F Chinook heavy lift helicopters steps far from the slapdash, frequently fallible procurement paths the armed forces have taken all too often. For one thing, the Chinook won a competition. Two, the government's decision to close the deal comes nearly three years of negotiations later -- an indication, perhaps and hopefully, that India has closed the best deal it could for the product. But now that the decks are truly cleared for a direct commercial sale contract between the Indian MoD and Boeing Defense, it's useful to examine sentiments within the Indian Air Force, which will operate the Chinooks possibly from its Chandigarh base, but possible closer to the country's capital too. Here are five reasons why the CH-47F Chinook in IAF colours (as detailed for the first time by artist Saurav Chordia above) could be a true game-changer in Indian service:

 

1. The IAF has had a troubled run with its spare heavylift rotory wing capability. Of the four Mi-26 Halos it bought in the eighties, three remain (one was written off after a severe crash-landing five years ago). But even before the accident, the platform has had typically severe serviceability issues that have mostly seen only one in the air at any given time -- not the worst of scenarios for such a small fleet, but grossly less than what the IAF wanted from these machines. Replaced with a full-sized fleet of new generation helicopters will give IAF planners the kind of heavylift rotory wing flexibility they've never had before. Squadron-sized numbers (and, of course, newer circumstances) will shore up serviceability and put more numbers in pilots' hands. The last few years have demonstrated that the ability to have more than one of these helicopters in the air at any given time is the difference, quite literally, between life and death. More numbers of heavylift copters in aero-bridge operations during humanitarian relief or disaster reconstruction work will be crucial.

 

2. Trials in 2010-11 convinced the IAF in no small measure that the tandem rotor capability would enormously boost what they were already doing with the conventionally framed Mi-26, especially in high-altitude operations. A comparison of what the tandem rotored Chinook could do in terms of landing approach capability, centre of gravity envelope etc., as opposed to the aerodynamic, performance and safety constraints on the CH-53 Super Stallion/Mi-26 proved to be too substantive to ignore. In simple terms, the IAF was convinced the Chinook could get more done, cleaner and safer.

 

3. The Chinook is substantially smaller and with a lower payload capacity than the Mi-26, but a higher degree of loading/unloading flexibility (especially rear loading) coupled with  a significantly greater number of cargo/troops/equipment configurations convinced the IAF that switching to the tandem rotor machine made more sense than explore the very capable Mi-26T2, that sports better engines, avionics and safety features than the variant the IAF currently operates. The Chinook's performance with under-slung cargo also won the IAF over.

 

4. The Chinook's flying qualities, agility in the air, significantly lower rotor diameter and landing flexibility will allow the IAF to fly it where it couldn't have even thought of taking the Mi-26. High altitude border areas, along narrow ridges and valleys, to deliver equipment, humans or materials for construction, road-building/repair, communications infrastructure building, disaster relief, casualty evacuation or any of the several other mission profiles the Chinook is built for. Why is that a game-changer? Because the IAF cannot satisfactorily deliver heavy payloads to precise sites even now. If not fully in some areas, tandem rotor operations will close the gap significantly, allowing the IAF to deliver closer to sites of requirement than ever before.

 

5. The Chinook is only the second heavylift helicopter the IAF will have ever operated. Unlike the Mi-26  that has performed strictly a troop/cargo transport role, the Chinook will obviously have a special missions profile as well. While the IAF has been looking at the MH-47 special operations configuration, the CH-47F variant it has chosen will definitely be used for special operations training and exercises, and will necessarily integrated with the larger joint special forces orbat. The IAF, a master at finding innovative new uses for its kit, could throw up several surprises behind the stick of a Chinook.

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 07:35
A drone found crashed in South Korea (Photo: Korean Ministry of Defense)

A drone found crashed in South Korea (Photo: Korean Ministry of Defense)

 

September 29, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The growing availability of small, inexpensive UAVs that can (and are) used by criminals and Islamic terrorists has led to the development of several Anti-UAV Defense Systems (AUDS). These systems consist of multiple sensors (visual, heat, radar) to detect the small UAVs and a focused radio signal jammer to cut the UAV off from its controller and prevent (in most cases) the UAV from completing its mission. The detection range of AUDS is usually 10 kilometers or more and jamming range varies from a few kilometers to about eight.

 

AUDS can be defeated. For example a user can send a small UAV off on a pre-programmed mission. This can be to take photos or deliver a small explosive. No one has tried, at least successfully, using armed micro-UAVs yet but North Korea has been caught using small recon UAVs flying under automatic control.

 

If these UAVs are still detected they have to be destroyed via ground or air-to-air fire. This the South Koreans and Israelis have had to do several times. The Israelis were dealing with Palestinian Islamic terrorist groups using small UAVs, often Iranian models. South Korea and Israel has responded by adding more sensor systems, especially new radars that can detect the smallest UAVs moving at any speed and altitude. An American firm has demonstrated a high-powered laser that can take down small UAVs several kilometers away.

 

North Korea had been interested in UAVs since the 1970s but had never bought or built a lot of them. In the late 1980s North Korea acquired some of China’s first generation UAVs (ASN-104s). These were 140 kg (304 pound) aircraft with a 30 kg (66 pound) payload and endurance of two hours. Very crude by today’s standards but it took real time video and higher resolution still photos. In the 1990s the North Koreans produced some ASN-104s, apparently by just copying the Chinese ones they had. In the 1990s North Korea got some Russian DR-3 jet powered UAVs. These were faster but less useful than the ASN-104s. Attempts to use the DR-3 as the basis for a cruise missile design failed. In the 1990s North Korea also got some Russian Pchela-1T UAVs. These were very similar to the ASN-104s and that means not very useful at all. The Chinese and Russians used these first generation UAVs mainly for correcting artillery fire and this is what North Korea was seen doing with them, particularly North Korean coastal artillery.

 

In 2014 South Korea was alarmed to discover three North Korean UAVs that had crashed in South Korea. It was soon discovered that North Korea was using modified versions of the commercial Chinese SKY-09P UAV. North Korea gave the SKY-09Ps a new paint job (to make it harder to spot), a muffler (to make it less detectable) and installed a different camera. The SKY-09P was used via its robotic mode, where the SKY-09P flew to pre-programmed GPS coordinates, taking digital photos over selected areas and returned with those photos stored on a memory card. The SKY-09Ps found in South Korea had GPS coordinates in their guidance system showing they originated and were to return to a location in North Korea. The memory cards showed pictures of South Korean government (mainly military) facilities.

 

Thus the most successful UAV the North Koreans ever used turned out to be a Chinese commercial model, the SKY-09P. This is a 12 kg (26 pound) delta wing aircraft with a wingspan of 1.92 meters (6.25 feet), propeller in the front and a payload of three kg (6.6 pounds). It is launched via a catapult and lands via a parachute. Endurance is 90 minutes and cruising speed is 90 kilometers an hour. When controlled from the ground it can go no farther than 40 kilometers from the controller. But when placed on automatic it can go about 60 kilometers into South Korea and return with photos. These things cost the North Koreans a few thousand dollars each. While South Korea says they detected two of the three crashed North Korea UAVs no other details were provided. The Chinese manufacturer denied selling anything to North Korea, but the North Koreans typically use a third party for purchases like this.  

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30 septembre 2015 3 30 /09 /septembre /2015 06:55
Atos et Airbus DS font cause commune dans la cyberdéfense

 

28/09/2015 (Boursier.com)

 

Airbus Defence and Space et Atos ont décidé d'unir leurs forces dans la cybersécurité. Le pacte a été formalisé par un accord de partenariat stratégique, visant à mutualiser leur recherche et développement pour proposer une offre globale de produits, services et solutions pour lutter contre les cyber-attaques. Atos s'appuiera, notamment, sur sa filiale Bull pour ce projet.

 

L'accord de distribution a vocation à être mondial et vise plusieurs secteurs, des banques et assureurs à l'industrie en passant par la défense. A ce stade, les deux sociétés n'ont pas donné d'indications sur les modalités exactes de leur alliance, ni sur sa gouvernance.

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29 septembre 2015 2 29 /09 /septembre /2015 16:40
Platform-M, le robot combattant russe

 

29 septembre 2015  Par Thierry BERTHIER Chaire de Cybersécurité & Cyberdéfense Saint-Cyr – Thales

 

En une semaine, la Russie de V. Poutine a réalisé un tour de force en s’imposant à la table de discussion au sujet de l’avenir de la Syrie, sous couvert de lutte contre le terrorisme. Une autre raison de s’intéresser à la Russie, Platform-M, le robot combattant. De quoi s’agit-il ?

 

LES autorités russes viennent d’annoncer très officiellement que l’unité de robots de combat Platform-M a été intégrée pour la toute première fois à un dispositif opérationnel déployé à l’occasion d’une campagne d’exercices militaires. Cette unité composée exclusivement de robots a participé à l’ensemble des exercices qui ont eu lieu mi-juin 2015 dans la région de Kaliningrad et a donné entière satisfaction. Platform-M est une plate-forme robotisée « télécommandée » de combat dédiée au renseignement, à la détection et à la neutralisation de cibles fixes et mobiles. Très polyvalente, elle peut être utilisée en soutien, en appui feu, en défense d’une base militaire, ou dans une mission plus offensive de prise de contrôle d’une zone urbaine tenue par l’ennemi. Ces robots sont apparus publiquement le 9 mai 2015 à Kaliningrad lors des défilés de la grande parade militaire célébrant la victoire russe de 1945.

 

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28 septembre 2015 1 28 /09 /septembre /2015 17:55
Le Pôle d’excellence cyber se structure en association Loi 1901



24/09/2015 Ministère de la Défense

 

 À l’occasion du colloque international #CyberDefense qui s’est tenu à Paris ce jeudi 24 septembre 2015, le ministre de la Défense, Jean-Yves Le Drian, et le président du Conseil régional de Bretagne, représenté par Bernard Pouliquen, vice-président en charge de la recherche et de l’enseignement supérieur, ont signé les statuts fondateurs de l’association « Pôle d’excellence cyber ». Les dirigeants des 13 premiers grands groupes industriels partenaires étaient également présents pour cette signature : Airbus D&S, Alcatel Lucent, Atos-Bull, Bertin, Cap Gemini Sogeti, DCI, DCNS, EDF, La Poste, Orange, Safran, Sopra-Steria, Thales.

 

Lancé en février 2014, le Pôle d’excellence cyber – initiative conjointe du ministère de la Défense dans le cadre du Pacte défense cyber et du Conseil régional dans le cadre du Pacte d’avenir pour la Bretagne – a une vocation nationale et un objectif de rayonnement international.

Il a pour mission, au profit du ministère de la Défense et, plus largement, de la communauté nationale cyber, de stimuler le développement de :

-         l’offre de formation cyber (initiale, supérieure, continue) et sécuriser ainsi la disponibilité des compétences qualifiées,

-         la recherche académique cyber,

-         l’offre de services et de produits de confiance,

-         la base industrielle et technologique de cyberdéfense, avec une attention particulière portée aux PME-PMI innovantes, y compris à l’export.

 

Avec une approche résolument pragmatique, horizontale et collaborative, le Pôle d’excellence cyber compte déjà plus de 50 partenaires qui travaillent en réseau, indépendamment de leur taille ou de leur nature (publique ou privée, civile ou militaire). Il regroupe notamment les équipes cyber du ministère de la Défense, les écoles et universités, les laboratoires de recherche, les grands groupes prestataires et Opérateurs d’importance vitale (OIV), les PME ou encore les agences de développement économique.

 

Avec un intérêt et des sollicitations qui dépassent déjà nos frontières françaises et européennes, le Pôle d’excellence cyber compte à son actif de premières réalisations marquantes. Un accord général de partenariat pour la recherche a ainsi été signé avec 11 institutions, écoles ou universités. 22 formations nouvelles ou ayant intégré la cyber existent désormais, le nombre d’étudiants formés ou sensibilisés à la cyber en Bretagne a augmenté de 40 % et un appel à projets régional a permis de soutenir 11 projets portés par 13 PME innovantes.

 

Aujourd’hui, la structuration du Pôle d’excellence cyber en « association Loi 1901 » lui donne, au-delà de la structure en elle-même, les outils et les moyens nécessaires à l’accélération de son déploiement, grâce à l’engagement de ses partenaires : dès à présent, 30 millions d’euros minimum sur les 5 prochaines années.

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28 septembre 2015 1 28 /09 /septembre /2015 16:20
Le NCSM Fredericton, la première frégate de classe Halifax modernisée au début de 2015 (MDN)

Le NCSM Fredericton, la première frégate de classe Halifax modernisée au début de 2015 (MDN)


28.09.2015 par 45eNord.ca
 

Afin de sauver de précieux dollars en raison d’un budget très serré, la Défense nationale envisage tout simplement de réutiliser de vieilles pièces d’équipement dans ses futurs navires de combats.

 

Le premier des navires de combat de surface canadiens n’est pas attendu avant 2025, tandis que le dernier n’est prévu que pour 2041.

Les frégates de classe Halifax, mises en service entre 1992 et 1996, subissent depuis quelques années une mise à niveau afin de prolonger leur durée de vie grâce à un programme de modernisation d’équipement, qui permet à ces navires de devenir de véritables centres de commandement et contrôle.

Des documents obtenus par le Ottawa Citizen en vertu de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information, indiquent que par soucis d’économie le ministère de la Défense nationale envisage de se servir de navires précédents pour équiper les futurs.

Le gouvernement conservateur a bloqué le budget du projet des futurs navires de combat de surface canadiens à 26 milliards $. Le projet est de construire «jusqu’à 15» navires.

Fin 2013, le Vérificateur général du Canada Michael Ferguson avertissait déjà que la Stratégie nationale d’approvisionnement en matière de construction navale était sous-financée.

«Il faut des années pour concevoir et mettre en œuvre des projets de développement complexes, comme les projets de navires militaires», disait-il. «Il est donc important que les divergences entre le niveau d’ambition du gouvernement et la capacité de la Marine royale canadienne soient régulièrement évaluées et minimisées».

En d’autres mots, sur des projets d’une pareille durée, il n’est que normal que les budgets soient révisés pour tenir compte des changements inévitables (coût du matériel, de la main d’oeuvre, réévaluation des besoins militaires, etc.)

Ainsi, une solution envisagée est de réduire certaines capacités sur les vaisseaux tout en regardant la possibilité d’une «réutilisation des équipements [des navires de]classe Iroquois et Halifax».

Après l’incendie à bord du navire ravitailleur NCSM Protecteur, l’amiral Mark Norman avait déjà confié à 45eNord.ca que plusieurs options existaient quant à l’avenir du navire. Parmi celles-ci, le démantèlement du navire pour récupérer le plus de pièces possible et s’en servir «partout dans la flotte».

Dans une déclaration publiée sur le site web de la Défense, le ministère rappelle que le projet en est «actuellement à l’étape de la définition, ce qui signifie que nous en sommes à l’étape de préciser les détails, c’est-à-dire à l’étape de se pencher sur certains enjeux comme les coûts, l’échéancier et les exigences, et de cerner les risques rapidement afin de pouvoir les atténuer». De plus, «l’un des éléments clés de tous les projets de conception et de construction de navires de guerre consiste à élaborer des exigences qui aboutiront à des solutions abordables».

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21 septembre 2015 1 21 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
MQ-4C Triton photo US Navy

MQ-4C Triton photo US Navy

 

15 September, 2015 BY: Beth Stevenson - FG

 

London - Ahead of the release of the UK’s Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) next month, Northrop Grumman remains hopeful that the nation’s maritime patrol capability gap can be filled with its MQ-4C Triton high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned air vehicle.

 

This is not the first time that Northrop has expressed interest in the UK as a customer for the Triton, and it is eagerly awaiting the review in the expectation that it will address the shortfall in maritime surveillance. “SDSR is ongoing and we’re watching that very closely. We’re hoping that they’ll get a maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) out of it,” says Drew Flood, Triton programme executive for Europe at Northrop. The UK appears to favour the acquisition of the manned Boeing P-8 Poseidon aircraft, and Northrop hopes that it will follow the lead of the US Navy and Royal Australian Air Force in supplementing that platform with the MQ-4C.

 

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21 septembre 2015 1 21 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
Giraffe AMB - photo Saab

Giraffe AMB - photo Saab

 

Sept 15, 2015 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: Saab AB; issued Sept 14, 2015)

 

Defence and security company Saab has demonstrated and proven an improved capability for its Giraffe AMB radar to detect low, slow and small targets. This ‘Enhanced Low, Slow and Small’ (ELSS) function allows the Giraffe AMB to undertake dedicated counter-Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) operations, while conducting its full suite of regular air surveillance functions.

 

The new ELSS function was demonstrated in April during a UK-government sponsored trial to test and evaluate radar performance against demanding air targets in a complex environment. Known as ‘Bristow 15’ and conducted over the ranges at West Freugh, in Scotland, the trial is thought to be the only one of its kind held outside the USA.

 

Over six days more than 100 UAS sorties were flown against the radar, in multiple launches of up to six vehicles at a time. The Giraffe AMB showed unparalleled performance against low, slow and small airborne targets. Despite hundreds of birds and a demanding background of sea and ground clutter, the Giraffe AMB consistently detected, classified and tracked low, slow and small UAS vehicles flying increasingly complex tactical profiles. At the same time, the Giraffe AMB provided full, conventional air surveillance in its regular modes.

 

“Saab now offers ELSS as part of the Giraffe capability range. This gives a unique performance range from small slow UAVs, to rockets and mortars, to more traditional air targets, but all at the same time,” says Anders Linder, head of business unit Surface Radar Solutions, Saab.

 

With remarkable accuracy the ELSS function automatically finds and classifies low, slow and small targets; as slow and small as the quadcopter UAS vehicles typically flown by hobbyists. During the Bristow 15 trials, targets had a radar cross section as small as 0.001 sq metres. Saab’s ELSS function pushes the boundaries of small target detection, combines that with the latest in tracking technology and novel target classification techniques and wraps it up with a newly- designed, purpose-built human machine interface concept.

 

Although it was demonstrated on this occasion with the Giraffe AMB, the ELSS function can now be implemented on all Saab Giraffe radars. This means the Giraffe family of radars uniquely provides a simultaneous capability to detect and classify all kinds of air vehicles from ballistic missiles to the very small UAS.

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21 septembre 2015 1 21 /09 /septembre /2015 07:20
MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

 

AFA AIR & SPACE, WASHINGTON – 15 September 2015General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc

 

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA‑ASI), a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions, today announced that its Predator® B/MQ-9 Reaper® Extended Range (Reaper ER) RPA fleet has achieved a historic milestone with the first operational fielding of Reaper ER by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) last month.

“Reaper ER provides a tremendous capability increase in both range and endurance, and achieving this major program milestone wouldn’t have been possible without the dedication and commitment of our employees,” said Frank W. Pace, president, Aircraft Systems, GA-ASI. “We are pleased that the Reaper ER program has met the expectations of our Air Force customer and satisfied the enormous challenge of their Quick Reaction Capability [QRC] schedule requirement.”

A Reaper can be transformed into a Reaper ER through the integration of a field-retrofittable modification package consisting of two wing-mounted fuel tanks which significantly extend the aircraft’s maximum endurance. Reaper’s original external payload carriage configuration remains unchanged, providing the aircraft with a “mix and match” capability that allows it to carry both fuel tanks and an assortment of external payloads. To increase thrust and improve takeoff performance at higher gross weights, an alcohol/water injection system and a four-bladed propeller were incorporated, along with a heavyweight trailing arm landing gear system that enables safe ground operations at the heavier gross weight.

The Reaper ER program was a QRC requirement in support of USAF which challenged GA-ASI to deliver 38 Reaper ER aircraft in 13 months, and to be operational 18 months following contract award. The ER modification package was designed to be field-retrofittable so that fuel tanks and associated equipment could be installed quickly and conveniently on current Reapers at worldwide locations.

In related news, GA-ASI announced that Reaper ER has earned the company an honor from Aviation Week, with the company being named as a finalist for the 2015 Program Excellence Awards in the category of System. Reaper ER was selected for GA-ASI’s efforts to introduce unique and innovative changes to standard production programs in the execution of the aircraft’s production, including an innovative approach to leading and managing a QRC that implemented a disciplined production environment to meet a very challenging schedule. The company also was recognized for partnering with the U.S. Government to streamline the production line and adjust tools and processes to improve the execution of the program.

“This year’s Program Excellence submissions provided a wealth of lessons learned and best practices, from driving down cycle time and affecting the learning curve to process innovations that allow program teams to work smarter and achieve better results,” said Carole Hedden, Program Excellence editorial director for Aviation Week. “Our evaluation team of program experts narrowed the field from 72 original nominations to a field of 23 finalists who exemplified the best in creating value, adapting to complexity, team effectiveness, and producing results.”

The winners of the Program Excellence Awards will be announced November 4 in Scottsdale, Ariz.

High-resolution photos of Reaper ER are available to qualified media outlets from the GA-ASI media contact listed below.  

 

About GA-ASI

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., an affiliate of General Atomics, delivers situational awareness by providing remotely piloted aircraft systems, radar, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions for military and commercial applications worldwide. The company’s Aircraft Systems business unit is a leading designer and manufacturer of proven, reliable RPA systems, including Predator A, Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper, Gray Eagle, the new Predator C Avenger®, and Predator XP. It also manufactures a variety of state-of-the-art digital Ground Control Stations (GCS), including the next-generation Advanced Cockpit GCS, and provides pilot training and support services for RPA field operations. The Mission Systems business unit designs, manufactures, and integrates the Lynx® Multi-mode Radar and sophisticated Claw® sensor control and image analysis software into both manned and remotely piloted aircraft. It also focuses on providing integrated sensor payloads and software for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft platforms and develops high energy lasers, electro-optic sensors, and meta-material antennas. For more information, please visit www.ga-asi.com.

Predator, Reaper, Avenger, Lynx, and Claw are registered trademarks of General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

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20 septembre 2015 7 20 /09 /septembre /2015 16:20
MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

MQ-9 Reaper-ER photo General Atomics

 

20.09.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

Le 15 septembre, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems a annoncé le premier déploiement opérationnel de son Reaper Extended Range (Reaper ER). Un appareil qui peut rester en vol pendant 33 heures au lieu des 27 heures actuelles.

L'USAF avait exprimé en 2013 le besoin de drones armés ou de surveillance aux capacités accrues. 38 appareils doivent être modifiés

Selon General Atomics (lire ici), le kit comprend deux bidons sous les ailes et une nouvelle hélice à quatre pales. Les capacités d'emport (armement et équipement ISR) restent inchangées. 

Selon Defense Updates, GA-ASI cherche aussi à améliorer les performances des appareils dédiés à l'ISR dont l'autonomie pourrait être portée à 42 heures, en remplaçant les ailes actuelles de 20m par des ailes de 24m.

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20 septembre 2015 7 20 /09 /septembre /2015 11:50
Dutch air force chief dissatisfied with U.S. Army helicopter plan

A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter is one of the vehicles that may be replaced by the Future Vertical Lift program. U.S. Army photo

 

LONDON, Sept. 15 (UPI)

 

The U.S. military's Future Vertical Lift program to develop new battlefield helicopters does not impress the top air force chief in the Netherlands.

Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) commander Lt. Gen. Alexander Schnitger spoke at a rotorcraft panel at the Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition in London on Sept. 14, and voiced his disappointment with the ongoing U.S. efforts to create the next generation of helicopters.

"So far I am not impressed or convinced that the current plans are advanced enough to survive use past 2030," Lt. Gen. Shnitger said.

 

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20 septembre 2015 7 20 /09 /septembre /2015 11:50
Defence spending 2014: the EU picture

 

Back in 2012, when NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said that “there is a price to pay for security, but the cost of insecurity can be much higher,” there were few who fully grasped just how accurate his warning was. For many years, European defence budgets have largely been spiralling downward following decisions which now seem somewhat unwise given the rapid deterioration of Europe’s security environment.

That said, there was arguably little to indicate that heavy investments in the military were necessary, and the financial crisis did its bit, too, to dampen enthusiasm for military spending.

 

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20 septembre 2015 7 20 /09 /septembre /2015 11:50
European defence collaboration – Back to the future

 

With the EU facing increasingly hostile environments to its east and south, defence collaboration is once again back at the centre of European integration efforts. In December 2013, the European Council held a debate on defence for the first time since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty.

In its conclusions, the European Council identified priorities for stronger cooperation: improving EU rapid response capabilities, enhancing the development of military capabilities, and bolstering Europe’s defence industry. After decades of defence cutbacks across the continent, there are a growing number of shortfalls in European military capabilities.

 

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18 septembre 2015 5 18 /09 /septembre /2015 16:50
BattleView 360 ‘See-through’ Armored Vehicle System Makes DSEI Debut


18.09.2015 by BAE Systems
 

BAE Systems has used advanced fighter jet technology to create a situational awareness system that allows armored vehicle crews to ‘see through’ their vehicles in real time, and gives commanders a complete view of the battlespace.

The system, called BattleView 360, will be on display on the CV90 tracked vehicle at the DSEI exhibition in London this week. BattleView 360 is highly adaptable and is being designed to seamlessly integrate with multiple existing vehicle types, systems, and radios.


At its core, BattleView 360 is a digital mapping system that collates, displays, and tracks the positions of all surrounding features of interest in two- or three-dimensional modes. This allows a vehicle commander to make rapid and informed decisions and communicate plans and instructions to other vehicles. The displayed imagery helps crews identify friendly and enemy forces, and can be used to generate safer routes out of the view of the enemy.


“Knowing what is going on around you has always been a challenge for armored vehicle crews inside noisy machines with limited visibility,” said Peder Sjölund, technology manager at BAE Systems Hägglunds, a subsidiary of BAE Systems, Inc. in the United States. “BattleView 360 builds on years of work across BAE Systems to improve situational awareness and integrate information so that crew workload is reduced and they can make fast, yet effective, decisions. The result is increased battlefield effectiveness and survivability.”

 

The head-worn part of the system can be synced to vehicle cameras to provide a ‘see-through’ capability in both visual and infrared. It can also be used by dismounted soldiers to relay information back to the vehicle. In a complete battlespace picture environment, the display can be integrated onto other vehicles or even unmanned aerial systems. BattleView 360 employs a head-down touch-screen display to allow commanders to quickly assess information and make quick and efficient decisions for targeting or other purposes. It also allows the commander to view the display of other crew members, such as a gunner.


Investment in advanced technologies for the land domain is a key focus for BAE Systems. Similar investment in an intelligent turret technology is being carried out by BAE Systems Combat Vehicles (U.K.) business. Both the U.K. and Swedish programs are vehicle agnostic and the technology can be integrated with new or existing vehicles via an electronic architecture.
 

BattleView 360’s head-down system features include:

  • Displaying Blue Force positions

  • Route planning

  • UAV route planning

  • Route progress monitoring

  • Polygon sketching

  • Line sketching

  • Dead ground display

  • Red ground display (ground that can be seen by hostile forces)

  • Best route for self-calculation

  • Best route for hostile-calculation

  • Area of uncertainty from last hostile sighting

 

For multimedia, please visit: https://resources.baesystems.com/?c=5828&k=f17ac7a0b2

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18 septembre 2015 5 18 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
Thales lance une nouvelle radio pour soldat


16.09.2015 Thales Group
 

Thales annonce le lancement de SquadNet, sa nouvelle radio pour soldat, à l’occasion du salon DSEI 2015. Avec SquadNet, Thales vient compléter sa gamme de radios pour soldat, incluant notamment le Starmille, qui offre des fonctionnalités étendues telles que voix données et vidéo simultanées. La nouvelle radio SquadNet combine une forme d’onde de mise en réseau unique, un GPS intégré, une connexion Bluetooth, des capacités de cryptage programmable, et garantit, à un coût optimisé, des communications sécurisées dans un format à la fois compact, léger et économe en énergie.

 

Avec sa batterie amovible et rechargeable, d’une autonomie de 28 heures, Squadnet étend la durée des missions et réduit les besoins en batteries de rechange. Non seulement cela permet au soldat, moins chargé, de transporter davantage de vivres et de munitions, mais également de réaliser des économies d’approvisionnement en batteries et donc de réduire le coût de possession. La batterie étant rechargeable depuis presque toutes les sources d’alimentation USB, le choix du mode de charge est étendu, des panneaux solaires à la simple prise allume-cigare.

Grâce à sa forme d’onde exclusive, SquadNet peut fonctionner dans des zones où d’autres types de radios auraient du mal à le faire, comme par exemple les environnements urbains, les bois ou les terrains accidentés. Alors que la plupart des radios pour soldat offrent des liaisons point à point, Squadnet, grâce à son mode de relayage automatique, garantit une portée étendue et une parfaite résilience en termes de couverture. Dès lors qu’une autre radio SquadNet se trouve à portée, il est possible d’échanger des communications voix et des données de positionnement depuis toutes les autres radios du réseau.

Le GPS intégré affiche des données de positionnement sur l’écran de la radio. Couplées avec un dispositif Android, les données GPS apportent une excellente connaissance de la situation, affichant sur une carte ou une photographie aérienne la position et les déplacements récents de l’utilisateur et des autres soldats appartenant au même réseau.

L’application SquadNet offre également une fonctionnalité de type web-bridge (pont) qui permet d’établir une liaison, via des réseaux IP (3G, LTE ou Wi-Fi), avec des groupes de combat géographiquement distants. Cette capacité de liaison avec le soutien extérieur (reach back), permet une coordination à distance des groupes de combat et d’étendre la portée des opérations.

Légère et dotée d’un boîtier compact et robuste, la radio SquadNet est à la fois discrète et résiliente, quelque soit l’environnement d’utilisation. Son interface, simple et facile à utiliser, repose sur un matériel puissant et fonctionnel, toutes les informations et fonctions clés étant accessibles en un clin d’œil. Le soldat peut ainsi se concentrer pleinement sur sa mission, plutôt que sur ses outils. Avec sa conception axée sur l’utilisateur, la radio SquadNet est utilisable par tous, réduisant les besoins en formation et facilitant son déploiement opérationnel.

Sur un marché très compétitif, la radio SquadNet constitue, tant par ses capacités que par son prix, une solution très performante pour une grande diversité de clients, qu’il s’agisse d’un premier achat ou du remplacement d’une capacité existante.

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18 septembre 2015 5 18 /09 /septembre /2015 07:50
nouvelle version du sonar 2093 photo Thales

nouvelle version du sonar 2093 photo Thales


16.09.2015 Thales Group
 

Thales lance une version modernisée de son sonar à profondeur variable pour chasseurs de mines, désormais doté d’une technologie large bande permettant d’améliorer ses performances opérationnelles et son opérabilité, mais aussi de faciliter son soutien.

 

Points clés

  • Un sonar conçu pour contrer la menace des mines modernes en eaux profondes et peu profondes.
  • Sa technologie large bande permet au sonar 2093 d’offrir des performances en eaux profondes identiques à celles obtenues précédemment uniquement en eaux peu profondes.
  • La technologie de compression d’impulsions permet une détection à longue portée et la classification des mines de nouvelle génération à faible indice de cible.

Le sonar 2093 est un système multifréquence à profondeur variable destiné à contrer la menace des mines modernes, aussi bien en eaux profondes que peu profondes. Il est utilisé par les marines du monde entier dans des conditions opérationnelles souvent très exigeantes.

Afin d’améliorer les performances contre les mines à faible indice de cible, la nouvelle version sera installée sur tous les chasseurs de mines de la Royal Navy de classe Sandown, aux termes d’un programme d’une durée 60 mois. Thales sera responsable de la conception, de la fabrication et de la mise en œuvre des modifications, en vue d’intégrer  la technologie large bande sur le 2093.

Pour cette modernisation, Thales s’est appuyé sur la technologie du sonar de coque 2193, réputé dans le monde entier. Les capacités large bande permettent au sonar 2093 d’offrir les mêmes performances en eaux profondes que celles auparavant disponibles uniquement dans des environnements maritimes à faible profondeur. Ce sonar est proposé comme nouvelle installation ou dans le cadre d’un programme de modernisation pour les marines du monde entier.

« Thales est précurseur dans la lutte anti-mines et ces nouvelles performances permettent à nos clients  de moderniser leurs sonars 2093 actuels ou d’investir dans des systèmes entièrement nouveaux, en profitant de performances opérationnelles et d’une opérabilité supérieures, mais aussi d’un soutien encore plus efficace. »

Jeremy Standen, directeur général adjoint des activités Systèmes de Mission Maritime au Royaume-Uni

L’introduction de la technologie large bande permet d’améliorer les performances des contremesures anti-mines dans des environnements où de telles performances s’avéraient précédemment impossibles à obtenir. La technologie de compression d’impulsions permet une détection à longue portée et la classification des mines de nouvelle génération à faible indice de cible, en optimisant simultanément les performances au niveau de la réverbération et du signal sonore. Le réseau de transducteurs à large bande permet d’assurer des performances maximales, avec un système qui offre le meilleur rapport temps de cycle d’émission/largeur de bande aujourd’hui disponible dans ce domaine spécifique.

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