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4 décembre 2015 5 04 /12 /décembre /2015 17:35
L’Inde pourrait commander 3 sous-marins Scorpène supplémentaires

 

4 décembre 2015. Portail des Sous-Marins

 

La marine indienne envisage de commander des sous-marins Scorpène supplémentaires, en plus de sa précédente commande de 6 exemplaires, a déclaré jeudi le commandant de la marine indienne, l’amiral Robin Dhowan.

 

Bien qu’il n’ait donné aucune précision sur le nombre de sous-marins envisagés, un haut responsable de la marine indienne précise qu’il pourrait s’élever à 3 sous-marin. Une note officielle pour demander cette commande n’a pas encore été adressée au ministère de la défense.

 

Le nombre de sous-marins opérationnels au sein de la marine indienne est passé de 21 en 1986 à aujourd’hui 4 sous-marins Kilo mis en service entre 1980 et 2000, 4 sous-marins U-209/1500 vieillissants et un SNA loué à la Russie il y a 2 ans.

 

Selon des responsables de la marine indienne, seuls la moitié des sous-marins sont opérationnels, les autres restent à quai en attente d’entretien et de modernisation.

 

Référence : Defense News (Etats-Unis)

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19 novembre 2015 4 19 /11 /novembre /2015 13:50
£1.3Bn contract awarded for latest attack submarine

Anson Infographic - credits UK MoD

 

19 November 2015 Ministry of Defence, Defence Equipment and Support and Philip Dunne MP

 

A £1.3 billion contract to build the latest Astute Class attack submarine for the Royal Navy has been awarded by the Ministry of Defence.

 

Both time and money are being saved on the building of Anson, the Royal Navy’s fifth Astute submarine. Savings of £50 million for the taxpayer have been achieved during negotiations with BAE Systems, and the agreed build time is to date the shortest ever for the Astute Class, with a current schedule some nine months ahead of that for Boat 3 (Artful).

Defence Minister Philip Dunne made the announcement as he visited the home of the UK’s submarine manufacturing industry based in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria and viewed progress already made on the new submarine.

BAE Systems employs more than 7,600 people in its Submarines business, which includes those that work on the Astute programme, with thousands more working in the 400 suppliers across the UK submarine supply chain.

Defence Minister Philip Dunne said:

This £1.3 billion contract marks an important step in the progress of the Astute programme. This is a key part of our £166 billion plan to ensure that our armed forces have the equipment they need to defend the UK’s interests across the seas, in the skies and on land, both at home and abroad.

This new contract for Anson not only provides significant financial savings of £50 million to the taxpayer but also secures thousands of jobs in Barrow and across the UK supply chain, demonstrating the Government’s commitment to increase defence spending each year for the rest of the decade.

Director Submarines at the MOD’s Defence Equipment and Support organisation, Rear Admiral Mike Wareham, said:

The Astute Class provides the Royal Navy with the most technologically advanced submarines, offering much greater firepower, better communications, and more advanced stealth technology than their predecessors.

The first two of class, HMS Astute and HMS Ambush, are already in service and making a vital contribution to the defence of UK’s interest, both at home and overseas. Third of class Artful is undergoing sea trials and is due to be handed over to the Royal Navy by the end of 2015.

Featuring the latest nuclear-powered technology, the Astute class can circumnavigate the world submerged, manufacturing the crew’s oxygen from seawater as they go.

They also have the ability to operate covertly and remain undetected in almost all circumstances despite being 50 per cent bigger than the Royal Navy’s current Trafalgar Class submarines.

HMS Artful, the third of the Royal Navy’s new Astute Class attack submarines, set sail from Barrow in July.

On his visit, Mr Dunne was also able to see the progress being made on Barrow’s £300 million infrastructure upgrade programme, which is due to be completed by 2022. This will prepare the site for investment in a new fleet of four Successor Ballistic Missile submarines and the renewal of Britain’s nuclear deterrent.

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19 novembre 2015 4 19 /11 /novembre /2015 08:30
Saudi Arabia's Multi-Mission Surface Combatant will be based on the US Navy's Freedom-class littoral combat ships, seen here, but will be more heavily armed.(Photo US Navy)

Saudi Arabia's Multi-Mission Surface Combatant will be based on the US Navy's Freedom-class littoral combat ships, seen here, but will be more heavily armed.(Photo US Navy)

 

November 17, 2015: Strategy Page

 

Saudi Arabia has become the first export customer for the U.S. Navy’s new LCS (Littoral Combat Ship) type vessels. The Saudis are buying four modified LCS ships for $11 billion. This includes basing facilities, training and support as well as extensive modifications to the basic LCS design. The Saudi ships are heavily modified Freedom type LCS ships that the Saudis call MMSC (Multi-Mission Surface Combatant) frigates. The Saudis have been considering this purchase since 2005.

 

In early 2015 the U.S. Navy decided to reclassify the LCS as frigates. This was not unexpected as in size and function the LCS ships were very comparable to frigates. This type of ship was created during World War II as “Destroyer Escorts” (or DE, versus DD for destroyer). These were basically destroyers that were slower (smaller engines), smaller (fewer weapons) and meant for escorting convoys and patrolling areas where major warships were not expected. The DEs proved more useful than expected and were retained after the war and eventually renamed as frigates (FF) type ships. The LCS was meant to be much more than a frigate and used a very innovative design. All that did not work out as expected.

 

The Saudi MMSC armament will be heavier, including sixteen VLS cells carrying Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles (ESSM). These are anti-aircraft weapons with a range of 50 kilometers. There will also be a 76mm gun, eight Harpoon anti-ship missiles, several anti-submarine tubes, a 21 cell SeaRAM anti-missile system, a 20mm remotely controlled autocannon, ten 12.7mm machine-guns and more extensive electronics and defensive systems than the U.S. LCS. This includes a variable depth sonar, a torpedo defense system as well as a more powerful radar, and fire control system. A helicopter will also be carried. The heavier armament means the MMSC will not be able to use the mission modules the LCS was designed to carry. NNSC will probably have a crew of about a hundred.

 

Meanwhile the U.S. Navy continues having problems with the original LCS weapons and mission modules. There have been development delays (largely due to poor management) of three unique weapons systems developed for the LCS. The simplest weapon involved is a surface launched Hellfire missile. This missile was designed to be launched from aircraft but it has been long suggested that it be adapted for use from the surface, specifically from warships. The LCS Hellfire has been named the Surface-to-Surface Missile Module and won’t be ready for service until 2017. This module includes 24 Hellfire missiles. The problems are minor compared to the two other problematic modules; the one for mine hunting and one for ASW (anti-submarine warfare) system. The MCM (Mine CounterMeasures) module has no major problems with any of its sensors or mine destroying systems. The problems are with the “integration” (the hardware and software created to get all components of the MCM module to work efficiently together.) The MCM module was supposed to be operational by now but additional debugging will delay this at least until 2016. The worst problems are with the ASW module. All the components work well and integration is fine but in getting all this done someone lost track of module weight, which was not supposed to exceed 105 tons. The excess weight must be removed before the LCS can safely and reliably use the ASW module. This will prove expensive since most of the ASW components involved have been around for a while and are not easily or cheaply modified.

 

These mission modules (which the Saudis are not going to use) are in addition to the basic armament of the LCS which includes a 57mm gun, four 12.7mm machine-guns, two 30mm autocannons, and a 21 cell SeaRam system for aircraft and missile defense. The RAM (RIM-116 "Rolling Air Frame") missiles replaces the earlier Phalanx autocannon. SeaRAM has a longer range (7.5 kilometers) than the Phalanx (two kilometers).

 

The LCS began development in 2002 and in 2012 the U.S. Navy put it into mass production. Then in 2013 one of the three LCSs in service got its first tour in a combat zone (counter-piracy duty around the Straits of Malacca). There LCSs will take turns serving six month tours of counter-piracy duty and be based in Singapore.

 

All these problems, the new ones and many old ones, caused the navy to decide in early 2014 to cut the number to be built from 52 to 32. Mostly this was about shrinking budgets, but there’s also the fact that the LCS has been, for many admirals and politicians, much more troublesome than expected. This was to be expected because the LCS was a radical new warship design and these always have a lot of problems at first. LCS was basically a replacement for the older frigates as well as several jobs frigates did not handle. The LCS has gone through the usual debugging process for a new design and that has attracted a lot of unwelcome media attention. On a more ominous note the navy has decided to study the possibility of developing a new frigate design, which would incorporate some of the lessons learned with the LCS. Because of the money shortage that is also stalled.

 

Despite all the problems many in the navy still believe that the LCS is worth the effort. Costing less than a quarter what a 9,000 ton destroyer goes for and with only a third of the crew the navy sees many tasks where the LCS can do a job that would otherwise require a destroyer or frigate. The navy could have built a new class of frigates, but the LCS design was a lot more flexible, making it possible for different “mission packages” to be quickly installed so that LCS could do what the navy needed (like assemble a lot of mine clearing ships or anti-submarine vessels) in an emergency. This has not worked out as well as expected.

 

The LCS has many novel features which required a lot of tweaking to get working properly. One much resisted latest tweak was to crew size, with ten personnel being added. That made a big difference, because all LCSs have accommodations for only 75 personnel. Normally, a ship of this size would have a crew of about 200. The basic LCS crew was 40, with the other 35 berths occupied by operators of special equipment or special personnel (SEALs or technical specialists). In practice the original crew was usually 55. That was 40 for running the ship and about 15 for the mission package. From now on the number of personnel running the ship increases to 50.

 

The navy surprised everyone in 2010 by choosing both designs and requesting that the fifty or so LCS ships be split between the two very different looking ships. While both ships look quite different (one is a traditional monohull while the other is a broader trimaran), they both share many common elements. One of the most important of these is the highly automated design and smaller crew. The two different LCS designs are from Lockheed-Martin (monohull) and General Dynamics (trimaran). The first LCS, the monohull USS Freedom, completed its sea trials and acceptance inspections in 2009. The ship did very well, with far fewer (about 90 percent fewer) problems (or "material deficiencies") than is usual with the first warship in a class. USS Independence (LCS-2) was laid down by General Dynamics in late 2005, and commissioned in January 2010.

 

Both LCS designs were supposed to be for ships displacing 2,500 tons, with a full load draft of under 3.3 meters (ten feet), permitting access to very shallow "green" and even "brown" coastal and riverine waters where most naval operations have taken place in the past generation. Top speed was expected to be over 80 kilometers with a range of 2,700 kilometers. Basic endurance is 21 days and final displacement was closer to 3,000 tons. For long deployments the LCS has to resupply at sea or return to port for more fuel, food and other items.

 

The navy originally sought to have between 50 and 60 LCSs by 2014-18, at a cost of $460 million (after the first five) each. The USS Freedom ended up costing nearly $600 million, about twice what the first ship in the class was supposed to have cost. The navy believes it has the cost down to under $500 million each as mass production begins. At this point it looks like the navy will only have 32 LCS ships by the end of the decade and still unsure about exactly what it can use these ships for.

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13 novembre 2015 5 13 /11 /novembre /2015 08:55
Frégate Type La Fayette Aconit - photo Beaudoin Marine nationale

Frégate Type La Fayette Aconit - photo Beaudoin Marine nationale

 

12.11.2015 par Le Fauteuil de Colbert

 

Le coût global d'un navire de combat est pensé dans une démarche écologique, de sa conception à sa déconstruction. Mais aussi dans un souci de rationalisation financière en raison de la pression budgétaire. Les coûts de construction sont abaissés par le recours aux normes marine marchande pour une partie de la Flotte (frégates de troisième rang, navires de l'AEM, amphibie). Le volume des équipages a été divisé par deux ou trois. L'entretien des bateaux voit l'industriel de référence, DCNS, être mis en concurrence avec d'autres entreprises. Reste le poste énergie qui n'a pas encore connu de rupture. 

 

La première action, d'ores et déjà entreprise par le Service de Soutien de la Flotte (SSF), est une expérimentation (5 ans) lancée sur l'utilisation de peinture à base de silicone. La FLF Aconit est la première à recevoir un tel revêtement pour sa carène lors de son Arrêt Technique Majeur (ATM - 2010). En effet, la carène tend à accueillir faune et flore marine au fur et mesure de la croisière du bâtiment, augmentant d'autant la résistance à l'avancement.

L'objectif, outre les aspects environnementaux, est de vérifier si "cette peinture permettrait d'optimiser la consommation en carburant et peut-être de la diminuer" avant de généraliser à l'ensemble de la flotte.

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12 novembre 2015 4 12 /11 /novembre /2015 17:40
Des télés russes montrent par erreur le projet secret d'une torpille nucléaire

 

12.11.2015 Par Olivier Berger, grand reporter à La Voix du Nord - Défense Globale

 

En filmant un reportage très officiel et plutôt banal sur une réunion d'un comité militaire de la marine russe à Sotchi, en présence de Vladimir Poutine, deux chaînes, NTV et Pervy Kanal, se sont mises en grande difficulté. A un moment du film, les images dévoilent un projet secret de torpilles à charge nucléaire, nommé Status-6... Oups, Vladimir Vladimirovitch, on a fait une petite gaffe !

Suite de l'article et video

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12 novembre 2015 4 12 /11 /novembre /2015 08:45
 HSI32 interceptor photo CMN

HSI32 interceptor photo CMN

 

10 November 2015 by defenceWeb

 

A group of Mozambican sailors has completed training on the new HSI32 interceptors the country is receiving from France.

 

French shipyard Constructions Mecaniques de Normandie (CMN), which is building the vessels at its facilities in Cherbourg, completed the training of 34 Mozambican sailors on Friday, after six weeks of theoretical and practical training.

 

Over the course of two weeks, the sailors made a dozen voyages, with the final trips being under complete Mozambican crew control. After their training, the Mozambican soldiers were awarded diplomas at a ceremony, Mer et Marine reports.

 

With the completion of personnel training, the first three HSI32 vessels will be delivered to Mozambique by early next year. They will be transported to Africa via a cargo ship. Deliveries are expected to begin in December.

 

On September 5, 2013, the Mozambican government signed a 200 million euro deal with CMN to build the three Ocean Eagle 43s, three HSI32 interceptors and 24 fishing vessels over a two year period. In January Mozambique ordered another three interceptors, which will be delivered from December 2015 at a rate of one every two months. The first Ocean Eagle was launched on January 22 this year and the first HSI32 was launched at CMN’s facility in Cherbourg on 18 March.

 

The HSI 32s have a length of 32.2 metres and a width of 6.4 metres. Crew complement is 12. The type is made from aluminium for light weight and agility. Sensor options can include a surveillance radar, electro-optical sensors and a satellite link for transferring images and other data.

 

The HSI32 interceptors are able to reach speeds of up to 43 knots and can undertake patrols for three days, with a range of 800 nautical miles at 12 knots or 580 nautical miles at 33 knots. Weapon options include a remotely operated 20 mm cannon and two 12.7 mm machineguns. A 4.8 metre RHIB can be launched from the back of the boat. Crew complement is 12. These vessels are ideal for anti-piracy, anti-terrorism and anti-smuggling missions.

 

The Ocean Eagle 43 patrol vessel features an innovative trimaran design ideal for shallow waters. The model has a top speed of 30 knots and a range of 3 000 miles at 20 knots or 5 000 miles at 12 knots. Crew complement is seven, but another eight people can be accommodated aboard. A small helipad can accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) like the Schiebel Camcopter while a seven metre rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) can be launched from a ramp at the back of the vessel. Weapons options include a 20 or 30 mm cannon above the bridge and two 12.7 mm machineguns at the stern.

 

The new vessels ordered from France will provide a major boost to Mozambique’s navy, especially in light of recent offshore oil and natural gas finds. At present the country’s small navy comprises a single Conejera class patrol craft (Pebane) donated by Spain, a couple of Namacurra class harbour patrol boats donated by South Africa and around ten small patrol craft, including RHIBs.

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9 novembre 2015 1 09 /11 /novembre /2015 12:45
Stan Pontoon 3011 Water Barge - photo Damen

Stan Pontoon 3011 Water Barge - photo Damen

 

6 novembre 2015. Le 360 (Maroc)

 

Le leader néerlandais des chantiers navals, Damen, vient de livrer au Maroc une nouvelle barge de production d’eau. La Marine royale pourra désormais intervenir efficacement dans les zones touchées par la sécheresse.

 

La projection de puissance des forces navales marocaines se renforce par une nouvelle acquisition. Une nouvelle barge de production d’eau vient d’être livrée à la Marine royale par le leader néerlandais des chantiers navals, Damen, dévoile le site Mer et Marine, relayé par FAR-Maroc, spécialisé dans les questions de Défense.

 

Grâce à cette barge, de type Pontoon 3011, la Marine royale pourra intervenir efficacement dans les zones touchées par la sécheresse, fait valoir le site Mer et Marine, relevant que cette barge est équipée d’une unité classique en dessalement d’eau de mer, fonctionnant aux alentours de 9kWh/m3.

 

«La production d’eau douce pourra soit être stockée à bord, dans des cuves dédiées, soit être pompée vers la terre via des conduites ou canalisations », explique Mer et Marine.

 


Cet engin, réalisé aux Pays-Bas par Damen, a vu ses osmoseurs fabriqués par la société française SLCE Watermarkers, basée près de Lorient. "D’une capacité unitaire de 750 tonnes, soit une production d’eau douce de 1500 tonnes par jour, ces unités de type SLE32-42 sont intégrées dans des conteneurs de 40 pieds", explique Mer et Marine.

 

Avec cette nouvelle acquisition, la capacité de projection de la Marine royale, dont l’arsenal a été étoffé de plusieurs frégates genre Fremm et Sygma, sera davantage renforcée.

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9 novembre 2015 1 09 /11 /novembre /2015 08:55
Le MCO des embarcations de la gendarmerie confié à LGM

 

05.11.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

La société LGM, de Vélizy, a remporté un marché d'un montant maximum (avec part à bons de commande) de 13 099 756,52 € (H.T.) sur 5 ans.

Ce marché porte sur le maintien en condition opérationnelle de 32 vedettes de surveillance maritime de la gendarmerie maritime et des embarcations de projection. Ces vedettes et embarcations sont réparties sur 22 sites en métropole et outre-mer.

Selon l'avis, les prestations prévues sont les suivantes:
- prestations de maîtrise d'oeuvre industrielle d'ensemble et de maître de chantier ;
- ingénierie de MCO ;
- suivi en classe ;
- réalisation des prestations d'entretien, pièces et main d'oeuvre comprises, incluant la réalisation des tâches de maintenance préventive et corrective ainsi que la réalisation des modifications (engagement de disponibilité).

LGM est présente dans le domaine naval et gère la maintenance de plusieurs types de navires de la Marine (voir ici).

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 17:50
BAP Jules Verne (A 620) - photo Marine Nationale

BAP Jules Verne (A 620) - photo Marine Nationale

 

05/11/2015 Sources : Marine nationale

 

La Marine a attribué le marché de déconstruction des ex-transports de chalands de débarquement Orage et Ouragan, de l’ex- bâtiment de transport et de soutien Bougainville, de l’ex-bâtiment atelier polyvalent Jules Verne, de l’ex-remorqueur ravitailleur Rari et des ex-bâtiments de transport légers Francis Garnier et Jacques Cartier à l’entreprise Galloo Gent du groupe franco-belge Galloo. Les travaux de déconstruction seront réalisés à Gand en Belgique.

 

Les départs de l’ex-bâtiment atelier polyvalent Jules Verne et de l’ex-remorqueur ravitailleur Rari, respectivement de Toulon et de Brest vers Gand, devraient intervenir au printemps 2016, après obtention des autorisations de transfert transfrontalier de déchets et de transfert de produits liés à la défense.

 

Dans le strict respect de la protection des travailleurs et de l’environnement, la Marine met en œuvre une politique éco-responsable de déconstruction et de valorisation de ses bâtiments retirés du service actif.

RR Rari (A634) - photo Marine Nationale

RR Rari (A634) - photo Marine Nationale

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6 novembre 2015 5 06 /11 /novembre /2015 12:45
photo Le Marin

photo Le Marin

 

 

Le Dipika, navire amiral de la marine camerounaise, a quitté le jeudi 5 novembre le chantier IMS 700 pour des essais à la mer. Ce navire est l’ex-Grèbe, ancien patrouilleur de la Marine nationale, retiré du service en 2010. Il avait été vendu à la société Sofema.

 

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5 novembre 2015 4 05 /11 /novembre /2015 13:50
Patrolvessel KV Nordkapp (W 320) in the Adventfjord, Spitsbergen photo Prillen

Patrolvessel KV Nordkapp (W 320) in the Adventfjord, Spitsbergen photo Prillen

 

11/04/2015  Oliver Austin - DefenceIQ

 

This November, Norwegian Navy’s Nordkapp-class offshore patrol boats are to be fitted with the SIGMA 40 laser-gyro navigation systems, developed and manufactured by France-based Sagem.

 

The standalone system is designed to guarantee high-precision navigation even in the harshest environments. The Royal Norwegian Navy is said to have opted for SIGMA 40 because of its sustained performance under the country’s specific maritime conditions, including fjords, inclement weather and ice. The system also offers long-term resistance to shocks, complying with with shock resistance specifications in the military standard MIL-S 901 D.

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5 novembre 2015 4 05 /11 /novembre /2015 08:25
Coup de frein sur le programme brésilien de sous-marins

 

04/11/2015 LeMarin.fr

 

Après le coup de turbo, c'est un peu la douche froide : la marine brésilienne a suspendu la construction de sous-marins, pour laquelle elle a requis les services de DCNS et d'Odebrecht, son partenaire brésilien, dans le cadre du contrat Prosub.

 

Ce coup de frein a pour motifs la crise économique et les affaires à répétition qui secouent l'administration, le programme n'ayant rencontré aucune difficulté technique. Peu de détails sont encore disponibles sur le nouveau calendrier du programme.

 

Une demi-coque seulement a été réalisée pour l'instant. Prosub (programa de submarinos) prévoit la construction au Brésil de quatre sous-marins de la classe Scorpène (75 mètres, 2 000 tonnes) et d'un sous-marin nucléaire, qui est désormais retardé à 2025.

 

Le premier sous-marin (conventionnel) devait être mis à l'eau en 2017 (et le deuxième en 2019). Si les temporisations budgétaires sont confirmées, cette date ne sera pas tenue. La construction du SNA de 6 000 tonnes devait elle débuter en 2017. Déjà, les semaines des ouvriers locaux ont été écourtées.

 

Prosub comprend aussi une base sous-marine clé en en mains à Itaguaï, le total du projet revenant à 10 milliards d'euros. La marine brésilienne souhaite protéger ses 8 500 km de côtes et ses ressources en haute mer, notamment les puits d'hydrocarbures.

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5 novembre 2015 4 05 /11 /novembre /2015 08:20
photo US Navy

photo US Navy

 

Nov 3, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Navy

 

The U.S. Navy held a keel laying ceremony for the future USS Billings (LCS 15) at Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard, Nov. 2. Mrs. Sharla Tester, Billings' sponsor and wife of Sen. Jon Tester, authenticated the ship's keel. As the ship's sponsor, Tester serves as an advocate and honorary member of the crew .

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5 novembre 2015 4 05 /11 /novembre /2015 08:20
photo US Navy

photo US Navy

 

Nov 3, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Navy

 

Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) 6, the future USNS Brunswick, completed Acceptance Trials, Oct. 23. The ship, which was constructed by Austal USA, is the sixth ship of the EPF class. The EPF class ships were formerly known as Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSV).

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4 novembre 2015 3 04 /11 /novembre /2015 17:20
KATFISH (Kraken Active Tow FISH) sonar system

KATFISH (Kraken Active Tow FISH) sonar system

 

ST. JOHN'S, NL--(Marketwired - November 02, 2015) - Kraken Sonar Inc.

 

Kraken Sonar Inc. ("Kraken") (TSX VENTURE: PNG) is pleased to announce that its wholly-owned subsidiary, Kraken Sonar Systems Inc. has received a $1.5 million contract from a major international defence contractor for a KATFISH sonar system. Along with spare parts and support, the initial order could exceed $2 million. Due to the sensitivity of its business, the client's name cannot be disclosed.

The agreement includes multiple stages, starting with a first phase for the manufacture and supply of Kraken's KATFISH system. The customer will make an advance payment on the contract in 2015. Approximately 75% of the contract revenue is expected be realized in 2016. Subject to contract options, the next phases will position Kraken as a primary sonar supplier to the Unmanned Maritime Systems (UMS) market.

Karl Kenny, President and CEO of Kraken said, "This is a very significant award for us and demonstrates that KATFISH is a key objective in delivering on our "sensors-to-systems" strategy. This contract further establishes Kraken's underwater technologies in the Unmanned Maritime Systems industry and positions us for future contracts on UMS platforms."

 

KRAKEN'S KATFISH SURPASSES CONVENTIONAL SONAR SYSTEMS

Kraken's KATFISH is an actively controlled, intelligent towfish platform used to generate real-time, ultra-high resolution seabed imagery and maps for a variety of military and commercial applications. The system's primary sensors are based on Kraken's Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Sonar technology, real-time Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) processing algorithms and acoustic velocity sensors.

Conventional side scan systems are limited in that they only provide high resolution imagery at short range. KATFISH produces ultra-high resolution seabed imagery with constant resolution to very long range. The additional information provided by the KATFISH system delivers a detection and classification capability that cannot be achieved with a conventional sidescan sonar. The entire system is designed to be quickly installed and removed from craft of opportunity platforms and is packaged for easy transportation.

Kraken's sonar and underwater systems are targeted to the rapidly growing Unmanned Maritime Systems drone market which is primarily comprised of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) and Unmanned Surface Vessels (USVs).

 

KRAKEN'S KATFISH ADDRESSES A NAVAL WARFARE INFLECTION

The future of naval warfare continues to evolve toward smaller vessels, littoral operations and underwater intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Advanced sonar technologies, such as the SAS produced by Kraken, have matured to support solutions that can economically survey and detect small objects hidden on the seabed and can enter into confined spaces where underwater explosives are likely to be hidden.

The underwater defence market is evolving rapidly; responding to changing threats, tensions in the Middle East and Asia, economic and budgetary pressures and a growing eagerness by modern navies and developing countries alike to procure and deploy ocean drones such as UUVs and USVs.

UUVs are a proven technology that have been used for many years, mostly for mine countermeasures, oceanographic research and oil & gas surveys. In contrast, USVs, the naval equivalent of unmanned aerial vehicles (air drones) have not been widely used. While the technology for USVs is in its infancy compared with the aerial drones, this situation is about to significantly change.

Unmanned vessels, like unmanned aerial vehicles, provide military forces with reach and capability without the risk of manned systems. They keep the dull, dirty and dangerous jobs away from human personnel.

USV technology is maturing rapidly, and a number of USVs are market-ready, signaling a coming sea change in the makeup of the overall Unmanned Maritime Systems (UMS) market.

Industry analysts Market Info Group LLC estimate that the global Unmanned Maritime Systems market will reach US$11 Billion (cumulative) by 2020.

To view "Unmanned Maritime Systems Market Growth": http://media3.marketwire.com/docs/UnmannedMaritimeSystemsMarketGrowth.jpg

ABOUT KRAKEN SONAR INC.

Kraken Sonar Inc. (TSX VENTURE: PNG) is an industrial technology company, founded in 2012, that is dedicated to the production and sale of software-centric Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) sensors and systems. The Company's products are sold to leading defence contractors, commercial survey companies and research institutions for producing real-time, ultra high resolution imagery and bathymetry of the seabed. For more information, please visit www.krakensonar.com.

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3 novembre 2015 2 03 /11 /novembre /2015 17:25
Credits Marinha do Brasil

Credits Marinha do Brasil

 

02.11.2015 par Portail des Sous-Marins

 

Le programme nucléaire de la marine brésilienne est retardé par les restrictions budgétaires. Le rêve de la marine — la construction d’un sous-marin à propulsion nucléaire — devra attendre 2025, selon son commandant, l’amiral d’escadre Eduardo Bacellar Leal Ferreira.

 

Ce n’est pas la première fois, depuis son lancement en 1979, que le programme est ralenti. Mais il s’agit d’un des principaux projets de la marine brésilienne et de l’ancien président Lula dans le domaine militaire.

Le développement d’un sous-marin nucléaire a été intégré à un programme plus large, le Programme de Développement de Sous-marins (Prosub) au cours de son mandat.

Un accord signé avec la France prévoit la construction de 4 sous-marins classiques et une assistance pour la conception du sous-marin nucléaire.

Le programme Prosub comprend aussi la construction d’un complexe à Itaguaí : une base navale et des chantiers navals. Selon l’amiral Leal Ferreira, les travaux se déroulent selon le calendrier prévu.

 

Référence : Folha de Sao Paulo (Brésil)

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29 octobre 2015 4 29 /10 /octobre /2015 12:55
Credits Ulstein

Credits Ulstein

 

28.10.2015 par Le Fauteuil de Colbert

 

L'audition du Chef d'Etat-Major de la Marine nationale (CEMM), l'amiral Rogel, devant la commission de la Défense et des forces armées de l'Assemblée nationale est l'occasion de faire le point sur le programme BATSIMAR (BATiment de Surveillance et d'Intervention MARitime). 

 

A priori, il ne ressort que très peu d'informations. Il n'aurait pas été question d'un avancement du calendrier de ce programme de 2024 à 2022. Le député Gilbert Le Bris utilisait encore la date de 2024 et l'amiral Rogel n'emploie pas un autre calendrier.

 

Toutefois, le Chef d'État-Major de la Marine (CEMM) ne cache pas la situation très difficile traversée par les moyens de l'Action de l'État en Mer. Et respecter l'actuel calendrier (Horizon Marine 2025), avec une entrée en service des deux premiers BATSIMAR en 2024, n'est pas une situation acceptable. "Si nous attendions 2024, nous serions en « rupture globale temporaire de capacité », car tous les patrouilleurs outre-mer vont s’éteindre les uns après les autres."

 

 

Suite de l'article

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 17:35
HMNZS TE MANA - F111 (ANZAC class frigate) - photo RNZN

HMNZS TE MANA - F111 (ANZAC class frigate) - photo RNZN

 

October 26, 2015 By Lockheed Martin - defencetalk.com

 

Lockheed Martin Canada marked an important milestone toward modernizing the Royal New Zealand Navy’s two ANZAC Class ships. The company announced that the ANZAC frigate systems upgrade project has successfully completed the combat system critical design review on schedule and to New Zealand’s satisfaction. The government-mandated review proves a contractor’s progress and planning for all elements of a program. It covered in detail all of Lockheed Martin Canada’s plans for shipboard systems and designs. With the successful review, Lockheed Martin Canada can begin implementing detailed designs and plans for the system’s key components, which will in turn lead to ship installation. The milestone is the latest achievement for Lockheed Martin Canada’s ANZAC team in the 16 months since contract award.

 

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 08:35
Austal has launched a high speed support ship it is building for Oman. Austal photo.

Austal has launched a high speed support ship it is building for Oman. Austal photo.

 

Oct. 26, 2015 By Richard Tomkins (UPI)

 

HENDERSON, Australia-- Austal, the Australian shipbuilder, has launched a high speed support vessel being built and outfitted for the Royal Navy of Oman. The vessel is 236.2 feet in length and was launched Saturday from the company's facility in Henderson, South Australia, after 13 months of construction work. The future RNOV Al Mubshir will complete final fitting before sea trials. It will be delivered next year.

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27 octobre 2015 2 27 /10 /octobre /2015 17:30
LCS (photo Lockheed Martin)

LCS (photo Lockheed Martin)

 

25/10/2015 Par Michel Cabirol  - LaTribune.fr

 

Les Etats-Unis vont vendre quatre frégates de type LCS (Lockheed Martin) à l'Arabie Saoudite pour un montant de 11,25 milliards de dollars.

 

Entre la France et les Etats-Unis, il n'y a pas photo en Arabie Saoudite. Quand Paris se bat depuis des mois et des mois pour vendre une trentaine de patrouilleurs pour 600 millions de dollars, Washington vise quant à lui des contrats de plus de 10 milliards de dollars. Car Ryad est prêt à acheter aux Etats-Unis quatre frégates dérivées du programme Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), des bâtiments de combat multi-missions (Multimission Surface Combatant), qui sont fabriqués par Lockheed Martin, ainsi que l'armement associé, pour un montant total de 11,25 milliards de dollars, dont 4,3 milliards pour le support. Et dire que les deux pays sont brouillés en raison de la politique arabe de Washington...

D'ailleurs le ministère de la Défense américain (DoD) est déterminé à approuver cette  vente FMS (Foreign Miliary Sales), une procédure de vente d'Etat à Etat. Cette vente va "améliorer la sécurité d'un partenaire régional stratégique, qui a été et reste une force importante de stabilité politique et de progrès économique au Proche-Orient", a précisé  l'Agence de défense, de sécurité et de coopération (DSCA). En guerre contre le Yémen soutenu par Téhéran, Ryad souhaite moderniser sa flotte au moment où les tensions s'accroissent très fortement dans la région, notamment dans le Golfe persique où les navires saoudiens sont confrontés aux bateaux iraniens à l'est du royaume.

 

De nombreux missiles à bord

La commande entre les deux alliés "brouillés" concernerait 532 missiles tactiques anti-aériens RIM-162 ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles) de Raytheon, dont 128 installés sur les quatre navires de guerre. En outre, les Multimission Surface Combatant (MMSC) seront dotés de 48 missiles anti-navires de type RGM-84 Harpoon Block II Missiles, de Boeing dont 32 installés et 16 destinés à des entraînements. Soit deux lanceurs par navire.

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27 octobre 2015 2 27 /10 /octobre /2015 12:30
Photo DCNS

Photo DCNS

 

26.10.2015 Par François d'Orcival – Valeurs Actuelles

 

Diplomatie. Les Américains ont commis une erreur stratégique en condamnant l’arrivée au pouvoir du maréchal Sissi. Ils en paient le prix…

 

L’Élysée a donné l’information, Matignon le prix, le ministère de la Défense le calendrier : les deux BPC (bâtiments de projection et de commandement) que nous appelons Mistral et que les Russes avaient baptisés Sébastopol et Vladivostok vont donc être livrés à l’Égypte, en mars prochain, après entraînement de 400 marins égyptiens. Montant de la transaction : 950 millions d’euros (le dédommagement dû aux Russes pour la non-livraison des deux navires en raison de l’embargo aurait pu nous coûter 500 millions de plus). Mais qui va financer la commande égyptienne ? L’Arabie Saoudite ? Et si la vérité était bien plus percutante…

 

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26 octobre 2015 1 26 /10 /octobre /2015 11:55
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

 

21/10/2015 Sources : Marine nationale

 

Vendredi 16 octobre, le contre-amiral Damlaincourt, adjoint à Brest de l’amiral commandant la force d’Action navale, a fait reconnaître le capitaine de corvette Bariller comme commandant de l’équipage A du bâtiment multi-missions D’Entrecasteaux. Cette cérémonie marquait également la première levée des couleurs sur cette unité. Construit à Concarneau par les chantiers Piriou, le D’Entrecasteaux ainsi que ses trois prochains sister ships ont vocation à assurer les missions de souveraineté outre-mer. Le bâtiment, armé par 2 équipages composés chacun de 23 marins, doit rejoindre Brest d’ici la fin de l’année pour y effectuer une période d’essais. Le bâtiment regagnera enfin, courant 2016, Nouméa, son port d’attache.

 

Les B2M sont dotés de deux équipages de 23 membres  qui  se relaieront à bord tous les 4 mois. Le second se consacrera à des tâches organiques, des phases d’entraînement à quai ou de permission. Il pourra également servir de renfort au premier équipage lors de maintenance et sera stationné dans le port d’attache du B2M.

 

Le Bougainville doit, quant à lui, arriver à Papeete au 4ème trimestre 2016, le Champlain à La Réunion au 1er trimestre 2017 et le 4èmeB2M –dont le nom n’est pas encore défini- aux Antilles à l’été 2017.

 

Bâtiments modernes et polyvalents,  les 4 B2M ont vocation à assurer des missions de souveraineté outre-mer (protection ZEE, projection, soutien logistique, sauvegarde et assistance), en remplaçant partiellement les bâtiments de transport léger (BATRAL).

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19 octobre 2015 1 19 /10 /octobre /2015 16:55
CMN to build a new shipyard in Cherbourg

 

19.10.2015 by Frédéric Brehier - CMN

 

CMN are willing to build a brand new shipyard in Cherbourg.

CMN work on the project for almost a year with the objective to develop a modern industrial tool close to the quayside. The project comes from four cardinal points:

– Human in the company

– Environmental excellence

– Improved industrial organization

– Modernization of the production tools

 

On 15th of July 2015 CMN received a favorable response to the call for manifestation of interest “Factory of the Future in Normandy”.

The first ship launch in CMN was in 1948, our buildings are old and we are limited in our production capabilities. The actual layout no longer corresponds to today’s industrial logic; we need to improve the optimization of our material flows and on our productivity.

Today CMN look to the future and consider settling of 8 hectares, 4 reclaimed from the sea, with 32500m2 of covered surfaces.

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16 octobre 2015 5 16 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
Surface Forces: The Zumwalts Are Fading Away

 

October 16, 2015: Harold C. Hutchison – Strategy PAge

 

The American Zumwalt class destroyers may find its production run truncated yet again, as reports indicate that the third ship of the class, Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), is on the budget chopping block. The result would leave the Navy with two of the advanced destroyers. Initially these radically new destroyers were meant to replace four Iowa-class battleships and 31 Spruance-class destroyers. The Zumwalts proved too expensive and mass production was cancelled.

 

DDG 1002 was already slated for some changes from the first two units of the class (Zumwalt and Michael Monsoor). DDG 1002 was to receive a steel deckhouse as opposed to the composite deckhouses used on the other two ships. This was meant to save money. There had also been a chance that one of the 155mm guns would be replaced with an electromagnetic railgun on DDG 1002. The electromagnetic railgun is another expensive navy effort that may see introduction delayed a long time because of cost considerations.

 

The Zumwalt class was planned to include 32 ships – more than enough to replace the 31 Spruance-class destroyers that were retired early in the 1990s and early 2000s. Armed with two 155mm guns, and 80 VLS cells while reaching a speed of up to 56 kilometers per hour, the 14,000-ton ships specifically designed to replace the Spruances in the land attack mission, which they had shifted to after the end of the Cold War. But it soon became apparent that many aspects of the Zumwalts were too ambitious. For example they were originally intended to have the Mk 110 57mm gun, but the Navy instead elected to install the cheaper and less capable Mk46 Bushmaster II, a 30mm cannon. The Zumwalts’ also incorporate a lot of automation and require a crew of only 150 but increased development and construction costs more than expected. 

 

The Zumwalt class was also hit hard by the navy budget crunch caused by so much money being shifted to the army after 2001 for operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Even before construction of the lead ship was funded in 2005, the class had been cut, first to 24, then to 7, then to 3, as costs kept climbing and navy requests for larger budgets went unanswered. The thing is, cutting the production run had the perverse effect of making the Zumwalt’s cost problems increase. Spreading the R&D cost of $9.6 billion over the original 32 ships would have only added $300 million to the price of each ship. By cutting the program to three units, each ship now shoulders $3.2 billion of the R&D costs.

 

Would the Zumwalt class have been a success? Two other high-tech programs that were truncated early, the F-22 and Seawolf-class submarine, indicating the answer might have been “Yes.” Instead, the Zumwalt will be widely derided as a failure, when the blame rests not on the designers or the Navy, but instead the budget-cutters. Meanwhile, the Navy will have a hard time finding enough hulls in the water to handle the many missions it will have.

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16 octobre 2015 5 16 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
3-D model of NASSCO's Expeditionary Base Mobile ship. Image courtesy of NASSCO

3-D model of NASSCO's Expeditionary Base Mobile ship. Image courtesy of NASSCO

 

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 15 By Ryan Maass (UPI)

 

General Dynamics NASSCO has begun construction of the second Expeditionary Base Mobile ship for the U.S. Navy. When completed, the ship will be 784 feet long, with a 52,000 square-foot flight deck. The ship will be equipped with fuel and equipment storage, repair spaces, mission planning spaces, and magazines. It will be able to accommodate up to 250 personnel, and support MH-60 and MH-53 helicopters, with an upgrade to support MV-22 tilt rotor aircraft.

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