Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 17:30

http://www.aviationweek.com/media/images/defense_images/Engines/GE-RollsF136_GE-Rolls-Royce.jpg

Photo: GE/Rolls-Royce

 

Apr 26, 2011 By Guy Norris, Graham Warwick Aviationweek.com

 

In a widely expected move, the U.S. Defense Department has officially terminated the General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136. But the companies have vowed to fight to restore funding for the Joint Strike Fighter alternate engine in the fiscal 2012 budget, indicating a willingness to help fund the remaining development.

 

The termination notice follows a “stop-work” order issued on March 24 by Pentagon acquisition chief Ashton Carter, pending final resolution of funding for the alternate engine in the fiscal 2011 budget.

 

As the final 2011 budget agreement contained no funding for the alternate engine, the Defense Department says “Carter directed the JSF Joint Program Office to cease all activity on the F136 development, and ... to terminate the F136 contract.”

 

“While we are deeply disappointed by the DOD’s notice of termination, GE and Rolls-Royce remain committed to the F136,” the team says, adding it “will work closely with our congressional supporters during the 2012 budget process in pursuit of incorporating the engine into the program, and preserving competition.”

 

Citing “bipartisan support for the engine on the merits of its performance and value,” GE/Rolls says “there is a significant willingness in Congress to revisit the F136 funding debate as the consequences of terminating the engine are being fully understood.”

 

The engine team plans to comply with the termination notice, but says that, “throughout that process, GE and Rolls-Royce will take all necessary steps to ensure that the F136 assets and intellectual property are protected. More than $200 million in F136 hardware is located in 17 facilities, including nine engines under various stages of assembly.”

 

The decision leaves Pratt & Whitney’s F135 as the sole engine for the F-35. Pratt parent company United Technologies immediately declared termination of the competitive engine a “victory” for U.S. taxpayers.

 

GE and Rolls have been spending company money to keep the 100-person F136 engineering team together while they have worked with supporters in Congress on efforts to get funding for the alternate engine restored in the fiscal 2012 budget.

 

Hoping to see funding in fiscal 2011, GE/Rolls had agreed to self-fund work on the F136 for up to 90 days after the Pentagon issued the stop-work order. That order prevented the companies from touching the government-owned engine hardware or having contact with the F-35 joint program office, so the core engineering team has been working on design improvements based on data from engine tests this year.

 

In a letter emailed to employees earlier April 25, before the termination notice was issued, GE Chairman Jeff Immelt says “we are discussing with our supporters in Congress how GE can help fund some of the remaining F136 development costs.”

 

If the key congressional committees decide that the F136 team will have to contribute significantly to development funding for the alternate engine program to be restored in fiscal 2012, “GE and Rolls-Royce will readily have that discussion,” says a spokesman for GE Aviation.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 17:30

http://www.asdnews.com/data_news/ID35034_600.jpg

 

Apr 26, 2011 ASDNews Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT)

 

Marietta, Ga. - The first Combat Shadow II for the United States Air Force Special Operations Command has completed its first flight at the Lockheed Martin facility in Marietta. Less than one month after a rollout ceremony for the aircraft's AFSOC customer the MC-130J has begun a series of flight tests prior to delivery to Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., in September. The new aircraft is based on a KC-130J tanker baseline and will have the Enhanced Service Life Wing, Enhanced Cargo Handling System, a Universal Aerial Refueling Receptacle Slipway Installation (boom refueling receptacle), more powerful electrical generators, an electro-optical/infrared sensor and a combat systems operator station on the flight deck. In-line production of this configuration reduced cost and risk, and fully supports the required 2012 Initial Operational Capability date. Lockheed Martin is contracted to build 15 MC 130Js to begin replacing the current aging fleet. The U.S. Air Force is authorized to acquire up to 20 MC-130Js against an approved requirement for 37.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 17:00

http://www.army-technology.com/projects/patriot/images/pat8.jpg

source army-technology.com

 

TEWKSBURY, Mass., April 26, 2011 /PRNewswire

 

Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) has been awarded a $58.3 million contract for Patriot Guidance Enhanced Missile-Tactical, or GEM-T, missiles. The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM), Redstone Arsenal, Ala., issued the contract to upgrade 131 Patriot Advanced Capability-2 missiles to the GEM-T configuration. This is a follow-on contract as part of AMCOM's Patriot missile continuous technology refreshment program initiated in 2000. "These continuing upgrades speak to the critical role Patriot plays in our 12 partner nations' air and missile defense capabilities," said Sanjay Kapoor, vice president for Patriot Programs at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS). "This cost-effective alternative makes it possible for them to increase their air and missile defense capabilities, using existing Patriot systems." The Patriot GEM-T missile upgrades include the replacement of select components that increase reliability and extend the service life of the missile. GEM-T upgrades are ongoing under existing contracts with the U.S. and other Patriot partner nations and are performed at Raytheon's Integrated Air Defense Center in Andover, Mass. Raytheon IDS is the prime contractor for both domestic and international Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems and system integrator for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 12:30

http://mms.businesswire.com/bwapps/mediaserver/ViewMedia?mgid=271235&vid=4

source businesswire.com

 

April 26, 2011: STRATEGY PAGE

 

For over half a century, the U.S. Department of Defense has been seeking a better night vision system for their pilots, particularly those flying helicopters and low-flying fixed wing aircraft. Decade by decade, the devices have gotten better, but they all had some limitations which, in turn, restricted what pilots could do while flying at night. Now a U.S. firm is demonstrating their HRNVS (High Resolution Night Vision System), which will eliminate the "looking through a straw" problem and provide a much enhanced image. This is one step closer to the perfect night vision system.  It's been a long journey.

 

It was six years ago that the U.S. Air Force has received the first of a new generation of night vision goggles. The ANVG (Advanced Night Vision Goggles) had a 95 degree field of view, compared to 40 degrees for the old ones. The 40 degree field of view was described as looking through a straw and required the user to look around a lot. This got old real fast, caused fatigue, and was responsible for some accidents. The first ANVGs were given to the crew of AC-130 gunships and the MC-130 transports used by SOCOM (Special Operations Command). Both of these aircraft frequently operate at night. A-10 pilots received them next, along with crews on SOCOM helicopters. The initial order was for about 400. The ANVGs cost about $10,000 each and run for twenty hours on two AA batteries.

 

Five years ago, another improvement was introduced. This worked by projecting what night vision devices (attached to the pilots helmet) saw, right onto the head up display items already being projected onto the helmet visor used by pilots. But when U.S. Marine pilots began using their Top Owl helmet visors in this way, some of them encountered hyperstereopsis (an exaggerated depth perception view). This was not safe for pilots flying close to the ground, so marines went back to using the older night vision goggles. These, despite the "looking through straws" problem,  at least avoided any depth perception problems. The Top Owl manufacturer (Thales) developed training methods to overcome the effects of hyperstereopsis when flying under 60 meters altitude, and the marines eventually resumed using Top Owl.

 

If HRNVS survives testing and initial use by combat pilots, this will represent another major step forward in night vision gear for pilots.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 12:30

http://www.avinc.com/img/media_gallery/PumaAE_UASmedia_lg.jpg

source avinc.com

 

April 26, 2011: STRATEGY PAGE

 

The U.S. Army is trying to find micro-UAVs that are more effective than current models, and just as easy to use. Recent field tests for the larger Puma, a 5.9 kg (13 pound) UAV with a 2.6 meter (8.5 feet) wingspan and a range of 15 kilometers from the operator, resulted in SOCOM (Special Operations Command)  ordering over a hundred systems (each with three UAVs and two controllers). All of these will be delivered this year. Larger orders from the army are expected as well, along with more from SOCOM.

 

Top speed for Puma is 87 kilometers an hour, and cruising speed is 37-50 kilometers an hour. Max altitude is 3,800 meters (12,500 feet), and the UAV can stay in the air for two hours at a time. Puma has a better vidcam (providing tilt, pan and zoom) than the smaller Raven, and that provides steadier and more detailed pictures. Because it is larger than Raven, and three times as heavy, Puma is much steadier in bad weather.

 

Puma has been around for a decade, but never got purchased in large quantities by anyone. The latest model uses much proven tech from the Raven (both UAVs are made by the same company). Like the Raven, Puma is hand launched, and can be quickly snapped together, or apart. A version, using a fuel, cell has been tested, and was able to stay in the air for nine hours at a time. There is also a naval version, built to withstand all that exposure to salt water.

 

The army has bought thousands of the 2 kg (4.4 pound) Raven, but it is mostly used for convoy and base security, and less so by troops in the field. Each combat brigade currently has at least 17 Ravens, but the army wants to increase this to 49 small UAVs, including Puma, and perhaps another model as well.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 12:30

http://www.asdnews.com/data_news/ID35020_600.jpg

 

Apr 26, 2011 ASDNews - Source : US Army

 

Washington - Some 23 Black Hawk helicopters have been freed from duty in the United States to go to combat elsewhere, thanks to stateside delivery of UH-72A Lakota helicopters. As Lakotas are fielded, said Col. John Thurgood, project manager for Army utility helicopters, they take Black Hawks out of the mix and send them back to combat. "As we field the UH-72A, we are able to take Black Hawks at some of those units and give them back to combat units, and those combat units take those aircraft to the fight," Thurgood said. "So the Lakota is a very important part of our Army strategy to make sure our combat units have what they need." "And to make sure our states, our governors, our homeland-security missions have what they need -- this platform delivers all those things," he continued. Thanks to delivery of Lakotas, about one assault battalion of Black Hawks have been freed to return to combat, Thurgood said, about half of a combat aviation brigade. Thurgood, along with John Burke, program manager for EADS North America's light utility helicopter program, spoke April 20, 2011, at a press conference regarding the Lakota program during the 2011 Army Aviation Association of America's Annual Professional Forum and Exposition in Nashville, Tenn. Thurgood said the Army has been pleased with both the aircraft and with contract performance. "They have been doing a tremendous job of producing every aircraft on time, or early," he said. "That's very important to us." Thurgood said the Army plans to purchase about 345 Lakotas, and today, about 154 have been delivered. "We are about halfway through the delivery of this program and doing it exactly on the cost and schedule that the Army asked it to do."

 

The Lakota is a slightly modified version of the manufacturer's commercial EC145 aircraft. "We literally chose the EC145, painted it green, and we've only added to it -- the basic aircraft -- one thing, and that's an ARC-231 radio," Thurgood said. The Army "knew what they wanted and they have held to that requirement," Thurgood said regarding the Lakota. "Holding ourselves to that requirement without changing it really gives the program managers a lot of flexibility to use best business practices." Variants of the Lakota include a two-litter medical version, a VIP version used in the National Capital Region, a security and support version used for state missions by National Guard units, and a version used by "opposing forces" during at combat training centers. The S&S version of the aircraft, on display at the AAAA convention, sported a mission equipment package with a search light, a GPS navigation system that allows pilots to find locations by street address as well as military grid coordinates, and a visual sensor ball that can transmit imagery to a ground station. Thurgood said there will be small continuous modifications for the Lakota -- the sensor ball might become obsolete, for instance, and may be changed eventually. But because the Lakota is essentially a commercial product, the manufacturer is incentivized to do continuous improvements on their version of it -- improvements the Army can opt to buy into without having to fund. "If they decide to put on a new tilt rotor system then the Army gets to take advantage of that without the investment to do that," he said. Conversely, for an aircraft like the Black Hawk -- the Army must pay for such modifications, Thurgood said.

 

Right now, the Lakota is fielded to National Guard units for state support, disaster relief and homeland defense, and in the active component where it's used in non-deployable units for medical evacuation and at training centers, for instance. "There is no better aircraft in the military's inventory right now for domestic operations -- there is none," said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Kevin Mudd, Utility Helicopters Project Office, Redstone Arsenal, Ala. "With its communications, sensors, and ability to be in a location you're not used to and still function and complete your mission -- this is the premiere domestic-operation platform right now."

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 11:30

http://cdnpullz.defencetalk.com/wp-content/themes/dtstyle/scripts/timthumb.php?src=http://www.defencetalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/AH-64D-Apache-Helicopters.jpg&w=375&h=245&zc=1

 

April 26th, 2011 By Army News Service DEFENCE TALK

 

Apache attack helicopters will soon field a new, high-tech Ground Fire Acquisition System, which uses cameras and infrared sensors to instantly identify the source location of ground fire, service officials said. "GFAS (Ground Fire Acquisition System) detects ground fire. It allows us to take information about incoming fire, get our sensors on it and identify and prosecute ground targets," said Maj. Justin Highley, Assistant product manager for the Longbow Apache. The infrared sensors built into the GFAS system detect muzzle flashes from the ground, allowing Apache pilots to get their sensors on potential targets and immediately know the location, and distance of ground fire, Highley explained. Next spring, 1-101 Aviation out of Fort Campbell will become the first unit equipped with GFAS, he said. The cameras on the aircraft detect the muzzle flash from ground fire - and move the information through an Aircraft Gateway Processor into the cockpit so pilots will see an icon on their display screen, said Lt. Col. Jeff Johnson, product manager, Longbow Apache. "The beauty of this system is that we are not changing the aircraft software. We are not adding displays. It's integrated through an Aircraft Gateway Processor," he said. Upon receiving the information about the ground fire on their display screens, the aircraft crew can move their Modernized Target Acquisition Designation Sight/Pilot Night Vision Sensors, or MTADS/PNVS, onto the target at the touch of a button, Johnson said. "The crew sees the point of origin where the muzzle flash was detected," he said. "It is not just about the aircraft, but about getting information to guys on the ground who are in the fight. Apache has led the way for other platforms with net-centric operations and situational awareness." The GFAS effort - called an Early User Evaluation - has undergone a range of key tests at places such as Mesa Ariz., and Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz., Johnson explained. Pending successful outcome of the User Evaluation, the Apache Program Manager will look at expanding GFAS' capabilities, including integrating the technology with Blue Force Tracker display screens, Johnson said. "Crews often return from missions in Afghanistan with small-arms damage to the aircraft," Johnson explained. "GFAS is an offensive targeting system. It is not a piece of aircraft survivability equipment. It helps us fulfill our mission of closing with and destroying the enemy." "How many of those forces who've been trying to shoot down our helicopters with small arms would have been eliminated by now if we had been able to pinpoint their locations?" Johnson said. "A recent historical example of why we need GFAS is the battle for Camp Keating in October 2009. We lost eight Americans and and had 24 wounded in one day because we could not locate an attacking enemy during the daytime." "Medevac could not extract our wounded until (9 p.m.), when it was dark and those small-arms weapons had finally been located and destroyed -- after 8 or 9 hours of fighting," Johnson said. "To me, that's unacceptable. Our Soldiers deserve better."

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 11:30

http://www1.american.edu/TED/images4/A10.jpg

source american.edu

 

April 26, 2011: STRATEGY PAGE

 

For the first time in twenty years, the U.S. Air Force has placed an order for PGU-13 30mm cannon rounds used in the A-10 aircraft. The A-10 is a 23 ton, twin engine, single seat aircraft whose primary weapon is a multi-barrel 30mm cannon originally designed to fire armored piercing shells at Russian tanks. These days, the 30mm rounds are mostly high explosive, and it has been heavily used in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as Libya. The 30mm cannon fires 363 gram (12.7 ounce) rounds at the rate of about 65 a second. The cannon is usually fired in one or two second bursts.

 

The new $32.5 million contract will not only include new rounds, but refurbishment of older 30mm high explosive rounds still in inventory. Over 200,000 new and refurbished rounds will be delivered within two years. Since 1991, the A-10s have been using up large Cold War era inventories, which is why refurbishing of some older munitions is included. Some of the older 30mm ammo was quite old indeed, since large war stocks had been maintained since the A-10 was introduced in the late 1970s. While only 716 A-10s were built, each carried the 30mm cannon, and 1,174 rounds of 30mm ammo. Wartime use of the 30mm rounds was expected to be high, and the ammo was bought and stockpiled accordingly.

Repost 0
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 08:00

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/23/Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force.svg/150px-Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force.svg.png

 

25 Apr 2011 By DAVE MAJUMDAR DefenseNews

 

The U.S. Air Force said April 25 that it will hold separate competitions for its Common Vertical Lift Support Platform (CVLSP) and HH-60 recapitalization programs. The CVLSP program is designed to replace the service's geriatric fleet of Bell UH-1N Huey helicopters, which provide transportation to security forces at nuclear missile bases and help to evacuate lawmakers during emergencies. The HH-60 recapitalization program is the Air Force's effort to replace 112 increasingly decrepit HH-60G Pave Hawk combat search-and-rescue helicopters. Service officials anticipate that both programs will draw industry bids based on aircraft derived from helicopters in production. Maj. Gen. Randal D. Fullhart, the Air Force's global reach programs capability director, said that the service anticipates releasing a draft Request for Proposal in the summer, with the final RfP in the fall. The CVLSP fleet will consist of 93 aircraft spread among Air Force Global Strike Command, the Air Force District of Washington and other major commands. "We're proceeding toward an initial operating capability for common vertical lift support platform program in 2015." Fullhart said. For the HH-60 replacement program, Fullhart anticipates a request for proposals will be released in 2012. The Air Force did not say how many aircraft it would buy. Industry welcomed the announcement. "Sikorsky welcomes a competition to offer the proven H-60M Black Hawk aircraft for both the HH-60 Recap and CVLSP missions," said Tim Healy, Sikorsky's director for Air Force programs. Healy said that the Air Force would derive significant savings from "Sikorsky's mature H-60M multi-year production line for the U.S. Army, and an established logistics support and aircrew/maintainer training effort." If the company was selected for both missions, Sikorsky estimates a "conservative savings of $3 billion … over the 25-year operational life of 205 HH-60 Recap/CVLSP aircraft." AgustaWestland also plans to compete for both tenders. It plans to bid its AW-139M helicopter for the CVLSP, and the larger AW101 for the HH60 replacement program. "We're enthusiastic and look forward to working with the Air Force as they develop their specs for the CVLSP program and HH-60 recap, and we anticipate being very competitive," AgustaWestland vice-president for strategy Dan Hill said. "We're ready”, Said John Williamson of The Boeing Co.: "Boeing looks forward to fully supporting the recently announced acquisition strategy to recapitalize the U.S. Air Force helicopter fleet."

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/United_States_Department_of_Defense_Seal.svg/200px-United_States_Department_of_Defense_Seal.svg.png

 

April 24, 2011 By Marjorie Censer, Washington Post

 

The Pentagon is launching a preferred supplier program to incentivize its vendors as part of a larger effort to promote competition and curb unnecessary paperwork and other bureaucratic hurdles in the procurement process. Ashton Carter, the Pentagon’s acquisition chief, said the Defense Department is making changes in hopes of driving down the cost of programs. He and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates last year first unveiled a departmental effort, dubbed the “better buying power initiative.”

 

Speaking at the Heritage Foundation last week, Carter offered an update on the effort to date. He said the Pentagon is readying the Superior Supplier Incentive Program, designed to recognize contractors who receive high marks in the Defense Department’s performance-tracking system. The recognition won’t help suppliers win work, but if they do receive orders, they could see better performance payments, among other rewards, said Carter. Additionally, Carter said he is now requiring all program managers to have a competitive strategy, or an explanation for how they will use competition to reduce the cost of their program. Acknowledging that head-to-head competition isn’t always feasible, Carter said there are other ways to cut program costs, such as contract provisions that provide companies a share of any savings they produce. The Pentagon also plans to reduce “non-productive processes and bureaucracy,” Carter said. Paperwork the department mandates not only costs money, but also obstructs companies unaccustomed to defense work, he said. “It’s important that we have an open defense system that is attractive and isn’t so exotic to sell to that companies, particularly small companies, can’t do it,” Carter said. He said the Pentagon will consider canceling more existing weapons programs but will also focus on driving down the costs of new programs. “You see that philosophy reflected in the new tanker,” Carter said of the Defense Department’s recent award to Boeing to build the next-generation aerial refueling tanker. The fixed-price contract means “we, the government, are insulated against cost growth in the tanker program, both in development and production.”

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.aviationweek.com/media/images/defense_images/Fighters/F35-LockheedMartin.jpg

Photo: Lockheed Martin

 

Apr 25, 2011 By Amy Butler Aviationweek.com

 

Vice Adm. David Venlet, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program executive officer, says he hopes that negotiations with Lockheed Martin on low-rate initial production (LRIP) lot V will progress more smoothly than they did for the previous lot. Lockheed is putting the finishing touches on its LRIP V proposal, which will comprise 35 aircraft. This will be the second fixed-price production contract for the company on the program. Protracted and contentious negotiations on LRIP IV took more than a year with a contract being signed in November. “As a sign of confidence, doing it faster is important,” Venlet told reporters April 21. In the meantime, government officials are conducting a “should-cost” review in preparation for the LRIP negotiations. The goal is to eventually reduce the final assembly time to 24 months, down from about 29 months today. In parallel, officials hope to ramp production up by about 1.5 times per year. While 2010 was focused on restructuring development and production in response to development delays, this year will put sustainment under the microscope. “We have some choices about how we sustain and support this aircraft,” Venlet says. “The service chiefs look at the estimates of the maintenance cost and it makes their knees go weak.” Venlet says that the Pentagon is conducting a separate should-cost review on JSF sustainment in an effort to drive the price down by identifying the most substantial cost drivers. “There is an estimate,” he says. “We know that is not the right number.” Venlet cites the estimate of more than $440 billion put forward by Naval Air Systems Command, which he led, as a starting point toward wringing cost out of maintaining the aircraft. Venlet is set to brief Pentagon acquisition chief Ashton Carter on the program in late May to seek a new Milestone B approval. The previous nod for production was essentially revoked last year as a result of the massive cost increase in the program.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.baesystems.com/static/bae_cimg_eis_tws2_latestReleased_bae_cimg_eis_tws2_Web.jpg

source Bae Systems

 

LEXINGTON, Mass., April 25 (UPI)

 

BAE Systems will provide more thermal weapon sights to the U.S. Army under a $56 million contract that continues production of the widely used system. The second-generation thermal sights give soldiers a day/night advantage to detect, observe and engage the enemy on the battlefield by providing imagery independent of darkness, smoke and other common battlefield obscurants. Under the contract, BAE Systems will provide light, medium and heavy variants for use on individual and crew-served weapons. The new order is the most recent under a five-year, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract administered by the Army's Research and Development Command Acquisition Center. A previous award increased BAE Systems' total thermal weapon sight contract value to more than $1 billion since 2004. BAE Systems has delivered more than 94,000 sights to meet Army fielding requirements to support operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. BAE Systems provides thermal weapon sights to the United States and several other countries.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.apa.az/photos/Sefer%20Ebiyev.jpg

 

25 avril 2011 APA

 

Bakou – APA. Le ministre azerbaïdjanais de la défense, Safar Abiyev a reçu le 25 avril, l’Ambassadeur des Etats-Unis, Mathew Bryza. Le ministre azerbaïdjanais de la défense et l’Ambassadeur des Etats-Unis ont discuté lé la coopération militaire, la sécurité de l’infrastructure de l’énergie, ainsi que l’entraînement militaire ajourné « Réponse régionale - 2011 », a indiqué l’APA, citant le service de presse du Ministère. L’attaché militaire des Etats-Unis, le colonel Malvin Douglas Sax a participé à la rencontre.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.aerojet.com/pix/hd_media.jpg

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 25, 2011 /PRNewswire

 

Aerojet, a GenCorp (NYSE: GY) company, announced today that Michael (Mike) Bright has joined the corporation as vice president of the Missile Defense Business Unit.

 

Bright comes to Aerojet from Lockheed Martin with a long history in the missile defense community. His very successful engineering, program management and product line management career make him an ideal fit for this leadership position. Bright has a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Fort Lewis College and has completed master's-level courses in Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Leadership, Program Management and Financial Strategies. He has received numerous prestigious awards which attest to his outstanding performance, management and leadership abilities.

 

Bright replaces Pete Massey, the current Missile Defense Business Unit leader, who will be leaving his position to join the company's Business Development and Strategy department. Massey has successfully led the Missile Defense team for the past 10 months and has been instrumental in overseeing the business unit's excellent growth and profitability efforts. His leadership has positioned us to both capture and retain critical program revenue. In his new role, Massey will enhance and expand Aerojet's external business relationships throughout the national and international marketplaces.

 

Aerojet is a world-recognized aerospace and defense leader principally serving the missile and space propulsion, defense and armaments markets. GenCorp is a leading technology-based manufacturer of aerospace and defense products and systems with a real estate segment that includes activities related to the entitlement, sale, and leasing of the company's excess real estate assets. Additional information about Aerojet and GenCorp can be obtained by visiting the companies' websites at http://www.Aerojet.com and http://www.GenCorp.com.

 

SOURCE Aerojet

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.f136engine.com/images/f136_division.jpg

source f136engine.com

 

25/04/11 By Stephen Trimble Flight International

 

The US government terminated a contract today that would have completed development of the General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136 alternate engine for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II. The order by Ashton Carter, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, means the Department of Defense can close the F136 production line. Carter also had the option to dispose of the F136 test engines already delivered, but has instead instructed the GE/Rolls team to preserve and deliver all government property. The termination follows a "stop work" order issued on 24 March, and comes after President Barack Obama signed an appropriations bill on 15 April that contains no funding for the F136. The F136 decision is still expected to be revisited next week by the House Armed Services Committee, which is chaired by Rep Buck McKeon, a strong supporter for a competitive engine to challenge the Pratt & Whitney F135 for F-35 orders. The GE/Rolls team was preparing to propose self-funding a portion of the remaining F136 development costs, with estimates ranging between $1.9 and $2.6 billion. In a letter to employees today, GE Chairman Jeff Immelt said the company is "discussing with our supporters in Congress how GE can help fund some of the remaining F136 development costs". GE also has proposed to sign contracts based on fixed-price rules to cover the remainder of development. "We believe that common sense will prevail and will preserve the $3 billion already invested in the F136," Immelt says. The DOD has been trying to eliminate the F136 programme for five years, arguing that any potential cost-savings from competition are out-weighed by the impact of upfront outlays to redundant engine suppliers. "While we are deeply disappointed by the DoD's 'Notice of Termination,' GE and Rolls-Royce remain committed to the F136 and the significant benefits it brings," the companies said in a joint statement.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
26 avril 2011 2 26 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=39327

 

26/04/11 By John Croft Flight International

 

A next-generation air transport system's avionics component should not be tested in real time - nor should new procedures for the National Airspace System (NAS). That is why the US Federal Aviation Administration created its NextGen integration and evaluation capability (NIEC). Located at the agency's William J Hughes technical centre at Atlantic City international airport, the NIEC is government and industry's one-stop shopping choice to test anything from new warning systems on air traffic controller displays to how pilots will eventually fly alongside unmanned aircraft and their ground-based operators. Elements of the laboratory, which has been open for business since June 2010, include a simulated air traffic control tower with a 270° "outside" view (eventually to be 360°), terminal and en route air traffic controller workstations, unmanned aircraft system ground stations, desktop computer "pseudo" pilot workstations and a fixed-base cockpit simulator for human-in-the-loop studies. Feeding the various simulators with realistic or real data are a variety of home-grown hardware and software suites that bring in weather, communications or surveillance data from other FAA laboratories or from the actual NAS. "The reason we built this lab is to give the opportunity for principal investigators to take a NextGen technology and introduce it so you can see the ripple effect across the NAS," says Hilda DiMeo, NextGen and operations planning director for the centre. Ongoing or completed projects demonstrate the capabilities much better than any brochure. This summer the NIEC will continue testing of an FAA project to determine what tools controllers would need to someday "man" control towers from remote locations. During two simulation sessions, investigators and engineers have progressively built the technologies and procedures that are part of the "staffed next generation tower" project. Elements of the project include a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-developed traffic information display system and tower flight data management system (an electronic version of paper flight strips) for controllers, and a variety of front- and back-end systems that the FAA built to allow controllers to see aircraft on the tower displays and out of the simulated tower cab windows. Standard procedure is to bring in one group of FAA controllers to develop the scenarios and a second group to take part in the simulated scenarios.

 

CAMERA VIEW OF OPERATIONS

 

A new element this summer will be the inclusion of a camera view of operations at Dallas-Fort Worth international airport. Controller participants in the NIEC will use a joystick and other controllers to steer the camera to zoom in and out. The end-to-end capability of the facility will allow for a gate-to-gate simulation if need be, with traffic seen first on controller screens, then from the tower cab, then to the screens of terminal and en route controllers and finally to the destination tower cab. A simulation later this year will use a level 4 fixed-base flight training device at the NIEC as part of a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) project to help determine how existing or new auxiliary avionics - in the form of an electronic flight bag - could help with the safety of transoceanic flights. The one-week study will include at least two airline crews who will fly simulated 4h moonless night missions from Miami to Lima in Peru to investigate methods of displaying satellite-based weather in the cockpit. Called "weather technology in the cockpit for transoceanic human over the loop", the project's goal is to help the FAA determine the most cost-effective and usable methods of bringing satellite-linked severe weather data to airline pilots in remote ocean regions. The June 2009 crash of Air France flight 447 over the South Atlantic on a flight from Brazil to Paris brought new emphasis to the problem. The fixed-base simulator will use an Airbus A320 cockpit with sidestick, rudder pedals, flight management system and ACARS thermal printer, but with reconfigurable displays featuring touchscreen controls to model other avionics and hardware. A class 2 electronic flight bag will also be used to display colour graphical weather data.

 

BASIC QUESTION

 

Arguably the most intense use of the NIEC to date has been from the UAS community, both within the FAA and the broader government and industry community. The basic question being addressed is what it takes to fly an unmanned air vehicle in national airspace. Avionics, both in the air and on the ground are an obvious piece of the puzzle. With six studies completed, officials are accumulating experience. One piece of software kit - a "stop light" - was developed for a study looking into how military UAS controllers and FAA air traffic controllers could better co-ordinate occasions where a remotely piloted vehicle must traverse civil airspace en route to a practice area. Simulations use actual or software-simulated UAS ground control stations integrated into the NIEC as well as links to various NAS elements for the human-in-the-loop studies. To date, there are three ground control stations integrated into the NIEC: the AAI Shadow 200, the General Atomics Predator and the Boeing ScanEagle. For the Cherry Point Marine Corps air station simulation with the Shadow 200, the FAA developed a traffic light indicator for controller displays based on the projected path of the unmanned aircraft vehicle ahead in time. The idea was to give controllers a light-coded alert that would provide ample time to make UAV flightpath corrections during a certain airspace transition to avoid civil aircraft not in contact with air traffic controllers. As with a traffic light, a green indicator on the screen signalled a nominal transition: yellow indicated a potential collision concern with other aircraft, and red an imminent hazard. As with the tower simulations, the UAS efforts are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Along with human-in-the-loop studies with a flight management system-equipped Shadow 200 capable of flying 4D trajectories set for later this year, the NIEC will also host an operational assessment of "multi-UAS" operation focused on Victorville, California. Along with the NIEC tower simulator and Predator UAS ground station, the simulation will introduce an AeroVironment Raven UAS, Boeing Hummingbird rotorcraft UAS and an airship, all flying in the simulated control tower environment. "The goal is to assess the feasibility of simultaneously operating multiple UAS in a joint-use military/civilian class D air traffic environment," says the FAA. Future enhancements to the NIEC include setting up a simulated airline operations centre in which airline representatives will interface directly with air traffic controllers to simulate how to better co-ordination between the two for events - like summertime weather - that traditionally snarl air traffic flow and force tough priority decisions.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 18:30

http://www.aviationnews.eu/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/The-first-Combat-Shadow-II-for-the-United-States-Air-Force-Special-Operations-Command.jpg

source aviationnews.eu

 

MARIETTA, Ga., April 25 (UPI)

 

The first Combat Shadow II for the U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command has completed its first flight at a Lockheed Martin facility. The test by Lockheed in Marietta, Ga., came less than one month after a rollout ceremony for the aircraft's AFSOC customer and additional testing of the MC-130J will take place prior to the aircraft's delivery to Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., in September. The MC-130J aircraft is based on a KC-130J tanker baseline and will have the Enhanced Service Life Wing, Enhanced Cargo Handling System, a Universal Aerial Refueling Receptacle Slipway Installation (boom refueling receptacle), more powerful electrical generators, an electro-optical/infrared sensor and a combat systems operator station on the flight deck. In-line production of this configuration reduced cost and risk and fully supports the required 2012 initial operational capability date. Lockheed Martin is contracted to build 15 MC-130Js to begin replacing the current fleet. The U.S. Air Force is authorized to acquire up to 20 MC-130Js against an approved requirement for 37, the company said.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 18:30

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/aircraft-pictures/BoeingMH-47Glarge.jpg

source flightglobal.com

 

PHILADELPHIA, April 25 (UPI)

 

The last remanufactured MH-47G Chinook has been delivered to the U.S. Army by Boeing's Military Aircraft Mobility Division in Pennsylvania. The handover of the 65th Special Operations Aviation aircraft marked the completion of the Service Life Extension Plan that has been in existence for more than 10 years. "This program has been a model of cost effectiveness and accelerated fielding," said Army Maj. Dan Henzie. "Because each MH-47G began its life as either a CH-47D or MH-47E, Boeing was able to accelerate the engineering and begin production years earlier than it could have provided a new airframe to the Army to support their critical mission. "Having this technology and combat power in the air over the past several years has undoubtedly saved American and allied warfighters' lives." Henzie is the U.S. Defense Contract Management Agency's Boeing-Philadelphia chief of flight operations and an MH-47G acceptance pilot. The remanufacture timeline for each MH-47G took about 16 months, Boeing said. DCMA Boeing-Philadelphia maintained oversight of the remanufacturing, which took place in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Although the last remanufactured aircraft has been delivered, there are plans to build additional MH-47Gs. The program office is planning the production of eight new-build aircraft. The timeline for new production hasn't been finalized but it could begin in the next three years, Boeing said.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 17:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/BAMS-UAS.jpg/474px-BAMS-UAS.jpg

 

NORWALK, Conn., April 25, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)

 

Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) has announced the start of system tests of a new Multi-Function Active Sensor (MFAS) being developed here for use by the U.S. Navy onboard the MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS). The MFAS is a 360-degree field-of-regard active electronically scanned array radar designed for maritime surveillance. The X-Band two-dimensional sensor features a combination of electronic scanning and a mechanical rotation, allowing the radar to spotlight a geographic area of interest for longer periods to increase detection capabilities of smaller targets, particularly in sea clutter. "BAMS will provide the Navy with a very capable persistent maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance system to provide a capability to detect, track, classify, and identify maritime and littoral targets," said Capt. Bob Dishman, the Navy's BAMS UAS program manager. "With our successful Critical Design Review behind us and sensor testing underway, our customer-industry team is rapidly pulling the components together that will result in first MQ-4C flight next year," said Steve Enewold, Northrop Grumman vice president for the BAMS program. The MFAS tests are being conducted in a laboratory environment at Northrop Grumman and are expected to continue over the next several months in parallel with ongoing radar software mode development and hardware synchronization and integration activities. The first MFAS sensor is scheduled for delivery to Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector facility in San Diego, Calif., in June with a second sensor slated for delivery in September. Risk reduction flight tests of the MFAS are planned for later this year onboard the company's Gulfstream II test-bed aircraft. "This is a very significant first step toward providing the U.S. Navy warfighter with a new and powerful ISR capability," said Paul "Buz" Kalafos, vice president of Surveillance Systems at Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector. The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C BAMS UAS is a versatile maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft system that will perform maritime missions independently or in direct collaboration with fleet assets. BAMS UAS will play a key role in providing fleet commanders with a persistent, reliable picture of maritime surface contacts, covering vast areas of open ocean and littoral regions in a highly efficient manner. The BAMS UAS program is managed by the Navy's Program Executive Office, Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons' Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The BAMS UAS is the latest addition to a growing family of unmanned systems developed by Northrop Grumman. The BAMS UAS system builds on the company's more than 60 years experience with unmanned aircraft and autonomous flight control, including thousands of flight hours by the combat-proven RQ-4 Global Hawk, the MQ-8B Fire Scout vertical takeoff and landing tactical unmanned aerial system (VTUAV)—the first completely autonomous VTUAV aircraft to land aboard a Navy vessel underway—and the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System—the first unmanned air vehicle scheduled to perform carrier landings.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 17:30

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Cobradane.jpg

 

DULLES, Va., April 25, 2011 /PRNewswire

 

Raytheon Technical Services Company LLC (RTSC), a subsidiary of Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN), has won a U.S. Air Force Cobra Dane radar systems contract valued up to $65 million for maintenance operations, radar sustainment, systems engineering and integrated logistics support. The Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency contract began April 1 and ends Dec. 31, 2015, if all options are exercised. "The Cobra Dane radar system is a key platform supporting the Air Force and Missile Defense Agency, and Raytheon's operational support and sustainment engineering have been instrumental in meeting the customer's missions," said John Harris, RTSC president. "Cobra Dane was introduced in 1977, and the upgraded hardware and software, which we support, have extended the system's operational life by more than 15 years," Harris added. The AN/FPS-108 Cobra Dane was originally built by Raytheon and modernized by Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 17:30

http://www.raytheon.com/newsroom/rtnwcm/groups/public/documents/image/rtn_rms_sm6_pic02.jpg

 

TUCSON, Ariz., April 25, 2011/PRNewswire

 

Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) delivered the first Standard Missile-6 production round to the U.S. Navy. "Five years ago, Raytheon promised the U.S. Navy that SM-6 would be delivered in March 2011, and we delivered on that promise," said Frank Wyatt, vice president of Raytheon's Air and Missile Defense Systems product line. "Raytheon delivered the SM-6 to our customer and met cost expectations for system development and demonstration. Now the U.S. Navy has a missile that provides an umbrella of protection against the full spectrum of air threats." SM-6 leverages the legacy Standard Missile airframe and propulsion elements while incorporating the advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities of Raytheon's Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile. "SM-6 is a remarkable missile because it combines the reliability of time-tested systems with all the latest advancements in missile technology," said Wyatt. "This missile can use both active and semiactive modes, giving the warfighter an enhanced ability to reach remote targets."

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 11:30

http://www.spacedaily.com/images-lg/monax-system-persistent-wireless-broadband-communications-network-battlefield-lg.jpg

 

Apr 25, 2011 Tinker AFB OK (SPX)

 

Military commanders may soon have the ability to access the full range of smartphone applications anywhere on their installations with the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) MONAX 3G wireless communications system. Lockheed Martin recently demonstrated the ability to successfully integrate MONAX to the legacy voice and data communications deployable infrastructure with the 3rd Combat Communications Group, at Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. "With MONAX, commanders now have the ability stay connected at anytime and anywhere on base with full voice, text, e-mail, imagery and applications," said Sam Guthrie, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Solutions-Defense Director of Strategic Development. "We demonstrated that MONAX extends existing communications systems and allows all these features with just one device on a secure private network." The MONAX communications system connects a COTS smartphone to a ground or airborne MONAX XG Base Station, enabling the use of a single, convenient, touch screen COTS smartphone. The system is frequency flexible, connects hundreds of users to a single base station, and delivers superior range and link performance in voice, video and data transmission. The network uses a secure RF link, protected through exportable encryption for joint and coalition operations. "Just as smartphones in the commercial world allow us to do much more than just talk to one another, MONAX will provide our warfighters with secure access to email, imagery and other mobile applications in a military environment," Guthrie said. The use of COTS devices means that MONAX is more affordable than other systems. It's also fully portable and can be deployed with the military unit, Guthrie said. In fact, in the case of a bare base deployment, MONAX can have commanders in full operations almost immediately and can replace the need for wired phone systems. Other advantages of MONAX for military installation use include the ability to talk simultaneously in two directions, unlike "push to talk" systems. MONAX also has greater range and can accommodate more simultaneous users than regular mobile phone system.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
25 avril 2011 1 25 /04 /avril /2011 06:00

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pJ0lK_nfSS0/Ta9f3wydtRI/AAAAAAAARJY/_LkPTAYHYYU/s400/KRS_0354_1.jpg

source snafu-solomon.blogspot.com

 

Apr 24 2011 by David Pugliese - Defence Watch

 

The U.S. Navy's Fire Scout Unmanned Air Vehicle system is about to begin its first land-based deployment to U.S. Central Command this month, according to the Naval Air Systems Command.

 

More from the command’s news release:

 

The Fire Scout effort is led by the Navy and Marine Corps Multi-Mission Tactical Unmanned Air System program office, PMA-266, at Patuxent River, Md. In response to an urgent needs requirement from DoD's Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance task force, the team rapidly modified, tested and verified the Fire Scout system to adjust to land-based operations and the demanding environmental conditions in CENTCOM. "This is an exciting time for the Fire Scout program," said Capt. Tim Dunigan, PMA-266 program manager. "The system has proven its capability on its two ship-based deployments, and I am confident it will perform well in CENTCOM." A combined team of military, civilian and contractor personnel loaded 90,000 pounds of equipment, including three aircraft, two ground control stations (GCS) and associated hardware, on U.S. Air Force C-5 and C-17 aircraft. The C-5 left with the GCS and hardware April 8, and the C-17 deployed April 13 with three air vehicles. "It's very unique for an aircraft to deploy directly from Pax River," Dunigan said. "The activity conducted by our test team at Webster Field was done exceptionally well. We were able to meet tight schedule timelines so we could support the warfighter as soon as possible." The Fire Scout will provide hundreds of hours of Full Motion Video in theater supporting U.S. Army and coalition forces during its year-long deployment. The system will be operated by contractor personnel. The Fire Scout's first flight in CENTCOM is expected this month. The system is also currently deployed aboard the USS Halyburton (FFG 40) tallying more than 200 flight hours to date in support of humanitarian assistance and counter-piracy missions.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
24 avril 2011 7 24 /04 /avril /2011 17:00

http://www.cdrinfo.com/images/uploaded/AntiLaser.jpg

 

avril 24, 2011 Armée du futur

 

Des chercheurs de l’université Yale ont mis au point le premier anti-laser au monde. L’appareil reçoit des faisceaux entrants de lumière qui interfèrent entre elles au point de s’annuler l’une l’autre. Les lasers fonctionnent en utilisant un semi-conducteur comme l’arséniure de gallium pour produire des ondes de lumière de même fréquence et amplitude. Ces ondes constituent un faisceau de lumière. A l’opposé, l’anti-laser utilise une gaufre de silicium ; lorsque deux faisceaux de laser sont envoyés sur une cavité contenant cette gaufre, celle-ci aligne les ondes de lumière pour les « piéger », les faisant ricochet d’avant en arrière jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient absorbés et transformés en chaleur. L’anti-laser, dont le nom scientifique est CPA (coherent perfect absorber), fait environ 1 cm de large et peut absorber 99,4 % de la lumière entrante. Les prochaines versions devraient atteindre 99,999% et faire 6 microns. L’actuel CPA est limité dans l’absorption de l’infrarouge mais les chercheurs pensent pouvoir traiter aussi bien le visible que l’IR. Si les applications annoncées portent sur les calculs optiques et la radiologie, on peut rêver à un boucler aux armes à énergie dirigée, encore au stade de développement.

 

Sources : Gizmag, CDRInf

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article
23 avril 2011 6 23 /04 /avril /2011 19:00

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Humvee_maintenance.jpg

 

23 Apr 2011 By MICHAEL HOFFMAN Defensenews

 

The U.S. Army issued its second request for information for the competitive Humvee recapitalization program April 21, which is meant to upgrade 60,000 vehicles for no more than $180,000 a copy. Army officials have said they want additional armor to put the Humvee's survivability on par with the mine-resistant, ambush-protected all-terrain vehicle but still keep it lighter than the M-ATV. Congress denied the Army's request to shift money from buying new Humvees toward a recap program last year forcing the service to issue a second RFI after the Army published the first one in January 2010. The Marine Corps could join the Army on the Humvee recap program by the time the Army is ready to issue a request for proposal, Col. David Bassett, the Army's project manager for tactical vehicles, said April 19. Marine Corps officials had already sent out an RFI to recap their Humvee fleet. As the Pentagon looks for budget savings, Bassett said it might make sense to bring the programs together. BAE Systems, Oshkosh and AM General, which makes the Humvee, have each developed kits that could compete for the Humvee recap contract. Each featured everything from double-V hull underbodies to advanced armor to structural blast channels, which vents a blast and provides structural stiffening. The recap program is part of the Army's Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Strategy the service released in January. The Army plans to stop buying new Humvees by 2012 and reduce its overall fleet of 260,000 trucks by 15 percent by fiscal 2017.

Repost 0
Published by RP Defense - dans North America
commenter cet article

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories