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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
Raytheon introduces new launcher for the TOW weapon system. Photo courtesy of Raytheon

Raytheon introduces new launcher for the TOW weapon system. Photo courtesy of Raytheon

 

Oct. 29, 2015 By Ryan Maass (UPI)

 

TUCSON -- Raytheon has introduced a next-generation TOW EagleFire launcher, the latest development in the TOW weapon family. The launcher is designed to fire both wire-guided and wireless radio frequency missiles. Raytheon officials say the EagleFire is a followup to the TOW 2 launcher, and features improved capabilities at a lower cost. These improvements include integrated day-and-night sight, range-finding capabilities, ergonomic handgrips, and an extensive built-in test capability. "We improved target acquisition and engagement found in the older TOW 2 launcher system," said Duane Gooden, vice president of Raytheon's Land Warfare Systems in a statement. "TOW EagleFire is simpler to maintain and more reliable, thanks to built-in test equipment and a significant reduction in system subassemblies."

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
AF Announces KC-46A Preferred, Reasonable Alternatives

 

Oct 29, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Air Force

 

Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, has been chosen as the preferred alternative for the first Reserve-led KC-46A Pegasus main operating base, Air Force officials announced Oct. 29. The KC-46As are expected to begin arriving in 2019.

 

Tinker AFB, Oklahoma; Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts; and Grissom ARB, Indiana, were named as the reasonable alternatives.

 

"It is absolutely critical that we replace our aging tanker fleet with the KC-46A Pegasus aerial tanker," said Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James. "I am pleased to announce Seymour Johnson AFB as the first Reserve-led location because it is a testament to the Air Force's commitment to the total force.

 

“We must use all three components -- active, Guard and Reserve -- operating cohesively and seamlessly as one team so we can realize the full potential of airpower."

 

James also explained the 179 planned KC-46A aircraft are just the first phase of a three-phase effort to replace the aging tanker fleet. The first phase of tanker recapitalization will complete deliveries in fiscal year 2028.

 

During detailed, on-the-ground site surveys of each candidate base, the major commands evaluated the bases against operational and training requirements, potential impacts to existing missions, housing, infrastructure, and manpower.

 

The site survey teams also developed cost estimates to bed down the KC-46A at each candidate base. The results of the surveys were briefed to James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, who selected the preferred and reasonable alternatives for this mission.

 

"Seymour Johnson (AFB) was selected based on operational analysis, results of site surveys, cost, and military judgment factors," said Jennifer Miller, the Air Force deputy assistant secretary for installations. “The primary drivers for selecting this location as the preferred alternative were its lower costs and its highly successful existing active-duty association, which will lead to the lowest active-duty manpower required to stand up the KC-46A Reserve unit.”

 

Selection of this total force unit will minimize costs and the challenge of fielding a new weapons system while simultaneously establishing a new active association.

 

"Bringing the KC-46A online is a huge first step in recapitalizing a tanker fleet that has been the world leader in air refueling for more than five decades," Welsh said. "The incredible Airmen who will fly this great machine, and the joint and coalition partners they support in contingency and humanitarian operations around the world, deserve the improved aircraft availability rates, reliability and capability it will bring to the fight. Rapid global mobility has always been a core mission of our Air Force; the KC-46A will help us take it to the next level!"

 

The Air Force will also ensure Reserve component involvement from day one by establishing active/Reserve associations at all U.S. main operating base locations.

 

“The Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve are vital to accomplishing our air refueling mission,” James explained. “Therefore, the ability to recruit for and maintain a strong Reserve component association was a major consideration in this basing action.”

 

“We will now begin the Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP),” Miller said. “We look forward to the inputs provided from the communities as we proceed through the environmental impact analysis.

 

“Once the requirements of the environmental impact analysis process are complete, the Air Force will make its final basing decision.”

 

Reasonable alternatives will continue to be evaluated during the EIAP. Subsequent KC-46 decisions will use similar criteria; therefore, candidate installations will likely compete for future continental U.S. basing decisions.

 

The KC-46A will provide improved capabilities, including boom and drogue refueling on the same sortie; worldwide navigation and communication; cargo capacity on the entire main deck floor; receiver air refueling; improved force protection and survivability; and multi-point air refueling capability.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
How much has Canada spent on the F-35 so far?

 

October 30, 2015 David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen

 

All eyes will be on the new Liberal government to see how they withdraw from the F-35 program.

 

How much has Canada spent on the F-35?

 

Canada has been a participant in the Joint Strike Fighter Program since 1997 and has spent US $309.3 million to date to participate in the program, Jessica Kingsbury, a spokeswoman for Public Works and Government Services tells Defence Watch.

 

The figure is broken down as follows:

- Concept demonstration phase (1997 to 2001)—Canada has contributed approximately US$10.6 million;

- System development and demonstration phase (SDD) (2001 to 2018)—Canada has contributed approximately US$94.4 million to date;

- Production, sustainment, and follow-on development phase (2006 to 2051)—Canada has contributed approximately US$204.3 million to date.

- Public Works could not provide current information on Canadian firms involved in the F-35. But a 2014 government update noted a little more than 30 Canadian firms have active contracts. They have secured contracts worth $637 million US.

 

The F-35 became a major political headache several years ago for the Conservatives. Although the Liberal government originally signed on to a research and development program for the plane, the Conservatives significantly expanded commitment and later agreed to the purchase 65 of the planes.

 

The purchase was later put on temporarily on hold by the Conservatives after concerns were raised about the cost of the F-35 and how the procurement process was handled.

 

During the election campaign Justin Trudeau promised to withdraw Canada from the F-35 program if the Liberals formed the government.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:50
Photo: Cplc Jonathan Barrette, CF Combat Camera / Caméra de combat des FC

Photo: Cplc Jonathan Barrette, CF Combat Camera / Caméra de combat des FC

 

29.10.2015 Aviation royale canadienne

 

Depuis son arrivée en 1960, l'aéronef Hercules a été un appareil très polyvalent au sein de l'ARC. Il continue de jouer un rôle important dans les opérations domestiques et outremers et est présentement utilisé à l'exercice JOINTEX 15 au Portugal, qui fait partie de l'exercice Trident Juncture 15 de l'OTAN.

 

Reportage photos

 

Pour de plus amples informations au sujet de JOINTEX 15, visitez : http://bit.ly/1M72Ac6

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:30
Turkey - Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM)

 

Oct 29, 2015 ASDNews Source : Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA)

 

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Turkey for Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM) and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $70 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on October 28, 2015.

 

The Government of Turkey has requested a possible sale of Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) tail kits comprised of 400 GBU-31(V)1 for use with Mk84 bombs, 200 GBU-31(V)3 for use with BLU-109 bombs, 300 GBU-38 for use with Mk82 bombs, 100 GBU-54 Laser JDAM kits for use with Mk82 bombs, 200 BLU-109 Hard Target Penetrator Warheads, and1000 FMU-152A/B fuzes. Non-MDE includes containers, support equipment, spare and repair parts, integration, test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor engineering and technical support, and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated cost is $70 million.

 

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:25
U.S. and Chile strengthen naval partnership in training

The USS George Washington (CVN-73) aircraft carrier participated in joint naval exercise UNITAS 2015 with Chilean forces. The exercise is the longest running annual naval training program for the U.S. Navy. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brendan Morgan

 

Oct. 29, 2015 By Ryan Maass (UPI)

 

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington hosted several Chilean officers as part of naval exercise UNITAS 2015. Carrier Strike Group Nine and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two also took part in hosting the officers, as they participated in several exercises designed to improve cooperative relations during tactical engagements. UNITAS is the Navy's longest running multinational annual training exercise. Sailors from both the U.S. and Chile said the program is helpful for building working relationships.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
U.S. Air Force prepares to launch next GPS IIF satellite

GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites. United Launch Alliance courtesy photo

 

Oct. 29, 2015 By Ryan Maass (UPI)

 

LOS ANGELES -- The U.S. Air Force Space Command is preparing to launch the 11th Boeing-built Global Positioning System IIF satellite on Friday. The satellite will launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 vehicle from Cap Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite (GPS IIF) aims to provide improved navigational accuracy. Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, the Space and Missile Systems Center commander and Air Force program executive officer for space, says the satellite plays a key role in modernizing space-based capabilities for GPS users around the world.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
LDUUV-INP. Photo credit ONR

LDUUV-INP. Photo credit ONR

 

Oct. 28, 2015 By Ryan Maass (UPI)

 

WASHINGTON -- U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced plans to deploy a squadron of underwater drones by 2020. The squadron will include the Large Displacement Unmanned Underwater Vehicle, or LDUUV, a 10-foot-long unmanned submarine. The vehicle is still under development, but it is expected to be fitted for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
Naval Air: Reapers Go To Sea

 

October 25, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The American firm that makes the 1.1 ton Predator and 4.7 ton Reaper UAVs is developing a maritime patrol kit for the Reaper. It takes about 12 hours to install the maritime patrol kit which includes maritime search radar, sonobuoys and the ability to transmit data collected by the sonobuoy sonar back to land or airborne analysts for further processing. Also carried are Hellfire missiles that can be used against surfaced submarines or small warships. The maritime reaper would be able to fly to a spot more than 3,000 kilometers off shore, patrol the area for up to ten hours and then return. This new maritime patrol kit was developed in an effort to get a contract with the British Royal Navy to provide maritime patrol UAVs the British are seeking. This would provide a maritime patrol at less than half the cost of the larger U.S. Navy RQ-4B Triton UAV.

 

The Reaper already has some experience with maritime reconnaissance. In 2009 several MQ-9s were sent to the Seychelles (a group of 115 islands 1,500 kilometers from the east African coast) to aid in the anti-piracy patrol. This apparently was successful enough to encourage further work in this area. At the same time Israel was using a Predator size UAVs (the Heron) equipped with a synthetic aperture radar and onboard software to provide automatic detection, classification and tracking of what is down there on the waters off the Israeli coast. Human operators ashore, or on a ship or in an aircraft, are alerted if they want to double check something the software was programmed to consider suspicious. Operators used video cameras on the Heron to determine exactly what was down there. Also carried are sensors that track the sea state (how choppy it is). Israel still uses this version and has sold some to India.

 

Meanwhile the U.S. Navy has five of the 13 ton RQ-4B Triton UAVs in service since 2012. These are modified RQ-4B (Global Hawk) UAVs that began operational testing in 2010. The Triton was assigned to operating with a carrier task force at sea. Circling above the task force at 22,500 meters (70,000 feet), Triton monitored sea traffic off the Iranian coast and the Straits of Hormuz. Anything suspicious was checked out by carrier or land based aircraft, or nearby warships. The Triton aircraft can fly a 24 hour sortie every three days. The first production Triton was delivered in late 2012. In 2009, the first year of Triton testing consisted of 60 flights and over 1,000 hours in the air. The flights were over land and sea areas, even though the UAV sensors are designed mainly to perform maritime reconnaissance.

 

The Navy is buying the Tritons for over $60 million each. This version is larger (wingspan is 5 meters/15 feet larger, at 42.2 meters/131 feet, and it's nine percent longer at 15.5 meters/48 feet) than the A model and can carry more equipment. To support that, there's a new generator that produces 150 percent more electrical power. The RQ-4 has a range of over 22,000 kilometers and a cruising speed of 650 kilometers an hour.

 

The first three RQ-4Bs entered service in 2006. At 13 tons the Global Hawk is the size of a commuter airliner (like the Embraer ERJ 145) but costs nearly twice as much. Global Hawk can be equipped with much more powerful and expensive sensors, which more than double the cost of the aircraft. These "spy satellite quality" sensors (especially AESA radar) are usually worth the expense because they enable the UAV, flying at over 20,000 meters (62,000 feet), to get a sharp picture of all the territory it can see from that altitude. The B version is a lot more reliable. Early A models tended to fail and crash at the rate of once every thousand flight hours.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 08:20
MC-12 Liberty taking off from Beale AFB, 25 January 2013 photo USAF

MC-12 Liberty taking off from Beale AFB, 25 January 2013 photo USAF

 

October 25, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The U.S. Air Force is giving away its 41 RC-12W electronic reconnaissance aircraft. These were acquired by the air force starting in 2008 to deal with the shortage of Predator UAVs in Iraq and Afghanistan. Now eleven RC-12Ws are going to the army, 26 to SOCOM and four to another (not named) agency. The air force does not usually give fixed wing aircraft to the army, which is one reason most of the RC-12Ws went to SOCOM. But there was still demand for the RC-12W and the air force is trying to cut expenses.

 

The MC-12s were quite useful and could stay in the air for up to eight hours per sortie. Not quite what the Predator can do (over 20 hours per sortie) but good enough to help meet the demand. The MC-12 has advantages over UAVs. It can carry over a ton of sensors, several times what a Predator can haul. The MC-12 can fly higher (11 kilometers/35,000 feet) and is faster (over 500 kilometers an hour, versus 215 for the Predator). The MC-12s cost about $20 million each, more than twice what a Predator goes for. The MC-12's crew consists of two pilots and two equipment operators. Since 2009 the air force MC-12Ws flew 79,000 combat sorties averaging about five hours each. The sensors and operators enabled ground troops to kill or capture over 8,000 Islamic terrorists along with hundreds of terrorist hideouts, bomb workshops or storage sites. 

 

The MC-12 was based on one of the most widely used, but largely unknown, military transport aircraft; the King Air twin-turboprop. There are nearly 300 in military service and it’s not surprising that most people think of the King Air as a civilian aircraft because most of the 6,000 built since the 1960s have been for commercial not military use. Yet over the decades more than a thousand King Airs have been bought, often second-hand by the military because the price was right and the King Air could get the job done.

 

The U.S. military has often used the King Air for ISTAR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance) work as the MC-12 or as transports (the C-12 Huron) and electronic warfare (RC-12) aircraft. There are so many King Airs out there that the military often buys used ones because they are so much cheaper and still get the job done.

 

The RC-12W electronic warfare version is crammed with vidcams, electronic sensors, jammers, and radios. This aircraft (Ceasar, for Communications Electronic Attack with Surveillance And Reconnaissance) can spend hours circling an Afghan battleground, keeping troops on the ground aware of enemy walkie-talkie and cell phone use, including location of these devices and translations of what is being discussed. The enemy is vaguely aware of what this militarized King Air can do but have no better way to communicate. Thus the few Caesar equipped aircraft sent to Afghanistan have proved very useful for the American and British troops that use them.

 

Military use of the King Air arose in the United States (where manufacturer Beechcraft is located) in the early 1970s, when the U.S. Army adopted the King Air as the RC-12 and then used it for a wide variety of intelligence missions ever since.

 

The current King Air 350 is a 5.6 ton, twin engine aircraft that evolved from the first King Airs that showed up in the 1960s as a 5.3 ton aircraft that could carry 13 passengers. In the 1960s a much improved 5.6 ton version called, until the 1990s, the Super King Air was introduced. The Super King Air is simply a slightly larger and more capable version of the original King Air.

 

The military and civilian users both admired the simplicity and sturdiness of the design. The only other civilian aircraft on the top ten list of military transports is the single engine Cessna 208. Beechcraft and Cessna are now combined into the same light aircraft division of Textron and individual models like the King Air and Cessna 208 will continue to be built and sold under the same names.

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30 octobre 2015 5 30 /10 /octobre /2015 08:20
photo NORAD

photo NORAD

 

Oct 29, 2015 by NORAD

 

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. – This morning, recovery operations commenced for the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS) fire control radar system aerostat.

Wednesday, at approximately noon EDT, the aerostat detached from its mooring station at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland. Around 4 p.m. EDT the aerostat grounded itself in a rugged, wooded area in northeast Pennsylvania. The aerostat landed in two separate but nearby sections; the tail and main body are separated by a quarter-mile. JLENS personnel in conjuction with Pennsylvania Army National Guard and Pennsylvania State Police secured the site, while a technical recovery team of military and civilian experts from Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, deployed to the site.

After the fire control radar system aerostat detatched, the surveillance aerostat was immediately lowered and secured as a precaution.

An emergency operations center has been established in Pennsylvania and the crash sites are being assessed. Recovery efforts are underway.

The Army has initiated an investigation to determine the cause of the incident. There is no indication that it may have been cyber or terrorist-related. The investigation will look at every aspect of how this incident occurred. 

For questions regarding the recovery process contact the Continental U.S. NORAD Region (CONR) at  850-283-8080. For general questions about the incident contact North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command Public Affairs.

JLENS is a supporting program of the Army and Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense, providing persistent, over-the-horizon radar surveillance and fire control quality data on Army and Joint Networks.  It enables protection from a wide variety of threats to include manned and unmanned aircraft, cruise missiles, and surface moving targets like swarming boats and tanks. 

NORAD is the bi-national Canadian and American command that provides maritime warning, aerospace warning and aerospace control for Canada and the United States. The command has three subordinate regional headquarters: the Alaskan NORAD Region at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska; the Canadian NORAD Region at Canadian Forces Base Winnipeg, Manitoba; and the Continental NORAD Region at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.

For more information about NORAD, refer to http://www.norad.mil.

Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/noradnorthcom.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
Lance ballistic missile - photo US Army

Lance ballistic missile - photo US Army

 

October 24, 2015 David Axe - War is boring

 

Military didn't know old Lance rockets were in storage igloos in Alabama

 

For 30 years starting in 1962, the U.S. Army deployed Lance ballistic missiles in Europe to deter Soviet attack. Twenty feet long and weighing a ton and a half, an atomic-tipped Lance could zoom 75 miles at Mach 3 and explode with a force of up to 100 kilotons of TNT. The Army retired its last Lances in 1992 … and ultimately lost track of 27 of them at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama, according to WAAY T.V.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 13:20
photo 355th Fighter Wing

photo 355th Fighter Wing

 

October 23, 2015

 

Officials downplay planned fly-off between warplanes

 

Several weeks ago, the Project on Government Oversight announced its cautious optimism upon learning the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation planned to conduct a close air support fly-off between the proven A-10 and the yet-to-be proved F-35.

The cautious aspect of that optimism has been proven to be warranted. Under questioning by Rep. Martha McSally, an Arizona Republican and former A-10 pilot, F-35 program executive officer Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan dismissed the idea of a comparative test as irrelevant. The exchange occurred during a House Armed Services subcommittee hearing on updates to the Joint Strike Fighter program.

Bogdan’s remarks echo earlier comments by Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh, who described the proposed test as a “silly exercise.”

Michael Gilmore, Director of Operational Test and Evaluation, said in late August, “The comparison tests on the close-air support mission will reveal how well the F-35 performs and whether there are gaps, or improvements in capability, compared to the A-10.”

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 13:20
CH-53K is a monster machine - photo Sikorsky

CH-53K is a monster machine - photo Sikorsky

 

October 27, 2015 by David Axe - warisboring.com

 

The first prototype of the CH-53K transport helicopter that Sikorsky is building for the U.S. Marine Corps took off on its debut flight at the company’s facility in Florida on Oct. 27. Sikorsky is building 200 CH-53Ks at a total cost of up to $23 billion to replace the Marines’ depleted force of around 150 CH-53E transports, which do the heavy aerial lifting for the Marines’ combat battalions. The triple-engine, seven-blade CH-53K will be, by far, the West’s most powerful helicopter, able to haul 18 tons of external cargo 110 miles — twice as much as the CH-53E can carry.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
SNC finishing development on pilot vision system

 

SPARKS, Nev. (October 23, 2015) - by Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has been awarded a task order for the next phase of development for its Degraded Visual Environment Pilotage System (DVEPS). The indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract with the United States Special Operations Command Technology Applications Contracting Office was initially awarded in 2013 to increase the safety of military aircrews worldwide.

SNC’s DVE Pilotage System will allow pilots to safely operate in degraded visual environments such as brownout, smoke, sand, snow, rain and fog conditions through the use of a multi-sensor, see-through imaging system that provides real-time, high-resolution fused imagery of the terrain and obstacles. This multi-aircraft, game-changing technology will increase aircrew situational awareness of obstacles throughout all phases of flight including people, power lines, ditches, mountains, rocks and other obstacles, reducing loss of life and equipment.

SNC was competitively selected for the third phase task order following a successful airborne test of its DVEPS program at the Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona in June 2015. This airborne test demonstrated SNC’s ability to fuse multi-sensor data into real-time, high-fidelity imagery during operations in DVE conditions. The final contract phase includes Integrated System Development/Demonstration, Low-Rate Production and Qualification testing. The effort will begin in fiscal year 2016 with Developmental Flight Testing, leading to a Milestone C decision followed by Low-Rate Initial Production to support Qualification and Operational Testing.

“It is a great honor to have been selected for the third phase of this important life-saving and mission enabling program that will provide agile, flexible and economical technology to our country’s military.” said Greg Cox, corporate vice president for SNC’s Communication, Navigation and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management business area  “DVEPS combines unmatched performance in a reduced Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) envelope, creating a superior system that was unavailable at the start of the program. We look forward to finalizing this phase of the contract, leading to a Full-Rate Production decision in fiscal year 2017/2018.”

 

About Sierra Nevada Corporation
Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), headquartered in Sparks, Nevada, delivers technology and teams designed to connect and protect, through innovative solutions in aircraft, aerospace, electronics, cyber and avionics. With a track record of success spanning five decades, SNC has been honored as one of America’s fastest-growing private companies, “The Top Woman-owned Federal Contractor in the U.S.,” and among “The World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Space.” SNC operates under the leadership of President Eren Ozmen and CEO Fatih Ozmen, with a workforce of more than 3,000 personnel in 33 locations in 18 states and business divisions in England, Germany and Turkey.

For more information on SNC visit http://www.sncorp.com/ and follow us at Facebook/Sierra Nevada Corporation. Sierra Nevada Corporation and SNC are trademarks of Sierra Nevada Corporation.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
Le futur bombardier stratégique américain LRS-B de l’US Air Force pourrait ressembler au B2 de Northrop Grumman

Le futur bombardier stratégique américain LRS-B de l’US Air Force pourrait ressembler au B2 de Northrop Grumman

 

28.10.2015 par Aerobuzz.fr

 

L’US Air Force a annoncé le 27 octobre 2015 qu’elle avait choisi Northrop Grumman pour construire son futur bombardier stratégique à long rayon d’action (LRS-B ou Long-Range Strike Bomber). Elle n’a pas retenu la proposition du consortium Boeing / Lockheed Martin qui a maintenant 100 jours pour faire appel de cette décision. Le contrat d’un montant estimé à 80 milliards de dollar porte sur la fourniture d’une centaine d’appareils dont le prix final d’acquisition a été fixé à 564 millions de dollars pièces. Sur les 80 Md$, dans un premier temps, 21,4 sont destinés au développement, à l’outil de production et à une première série de 21 avions.

Suite de l'article

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
photo Lockheed Martin

photo Lockheed Martin

 

27/10/2015 par George de Bonadona - Air & Cosmos

 

Le programme F-35 pourrait être malmené au Canada, allié pourtant indéfectible des Etats-Unis. Justin Trudeau, qui a été élu Premier ministre le 19 octobre, a fait la promesse que son pays se retirerait du programme F-35. Bien que le jeune fils de Pierre Elliott Trudeau n’ait pas encore pris ses fonctions, Washington a déjà manœuvré pour empêcher le Canada de quitter le couteux programme.  Car si Ottawa abandonne le programme de recherche et développement et l’achat des 65 appareils, Washington espère compenser cette perte par l’augmentation du prix d’achat unitaire de 1 million de dollars pour les autres pays acquéreurs. C’est ce qu’a déclaré le chef du programme F-35 au Pentagone, le Lieutenant Général Chris Bogdan de l’U.S. Air Force.

Suite de l’article

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
photo Lockheed Martin

photo Lockheed Martin


27 oct. 2015 by Lockheed Martin

 

The Perceptor Dual Sensor Gimbal is the smallest dual sensor gimbal on the market, featuring a lightweight electro-optic and infrared camera set that is capable of high precision 360-degree continuous panning and automated target tracking.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 08:20
Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR)

Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR)

 

Moorestown, N.J., Oct. 26, 2015 – by Lockheed Martin

 

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) awarded a team, led by Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT), a contract to develop, build and test the Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR). The radar system will support a layered ballistic missile defense strategy to protect the U.S. homeland from ballistic missile attacks.

The nine-year contract, with options, will have the potential contract value of approximately $784 million. Work on the contract will be primarily performed in New Jersey, Alaska, Alabama, Florida, and New York.

LRDR is a high-powered S-Band radar incorporating solid-state gallium nitride (GaN) components and will be capable of discriminating threats at extreme distances. LRDR is a key component of the MDA’s Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) that will provide acquisition, tracking, and discrimination data to enable separate defense systems to lock on and engage ballistic missile threats, a capability that stems from Lockheed Martin’s decades of experience in creating ballistic missile defense systems for the U.S. and allied governments.

“The U.S. has a limited number of ground-based interceptors to detect threats, yet the number of potential missile threats - and countermeasures used to hide those threats - is growing,” said Carl Bannar, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Integrated Warfare Systems and Sensors business. “Our offering meets the MDA’s vision for LRDR by pairing innovative radar discrimination capability with proven ballistic missile defense algorithms.”

This MDA selection builds upon the U.S. government’s long-term investment in S-Band radar, ground-based radar, and systems integration, as evident in such Lockheed Martin technologies as the Aegis Combat System, Space Fence, and Aegis Ashore. Since 2012, Lockheed Martin has offered solid state ground-based S-Band radar utilizing an Open GaN Foundry model that leverages relationships with strategic suppliers.

“Our mature, scalable, GaN-based S-Band technology was ideally suited for this high performance ballistic missile defense application,” Bannar said. “LRDR represents the latest evolution in ground-based radar and ballistic missile defense.”

When constructed, LRDR will consist of a solid-state, active electronically-scanned antenna, and the facility to house and operate this radar antenna. Lockheed Martin’s proposed LRDR system will be built on an aggressive timeline ready for operational testing in Clear Air Force Station, Alaska by 2020.

Lockheed Martin has developed a team of corporate partners to meet the challenges of the LRDR program, including deciBel research (Huntsville, AL), Amec Foster Wheeler (Alpharetta, GA), ASRC Federal (Barrow, AK), IERUS Technologies (Huntsville, AL), PENTA Research (Huntsville, AL), and Davidson Technologies (Huntsville, AL).

For additional information, visit our website:  www.lockheedmartin.com/lrdr

 

About Lockheed Martin
Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2014 were $45.6 billion.

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28 octobre 2015 3 28 /10 /octobre /2015 08:20
Le directeur de la CIA, John Brennan (Council on Foreign Relatiions)

Le directeur de la CIA, John Brennan (Council on Foreign Relatiions)


26.10.2015 45e Nord.ca (AFP)
 

Le directeur de la CIA John Brennan s’est dit mardi « scandalisé » et « préoccupé » par le piratage des ses emails personnels et a nié avoir violé ses obligations de sécurité.

 

La publication de certains emails personnels a pu laisser penser « que j’avais fait quelque chose de mal ou d’inapproprié » en terme de sécurité mais « ce n’était certainement pas le cas », a-t-il déclaré lors d’une conférence sur le renseignement à Washington.

L’organisation WikiLeaks a publié la semaine dernière plusieurs documents provenant du compte email personnel de John Brennan datés d’entre 2007 et 2009, avant sa prise de fonction au sommet de l’agence américaine du renseignement.

Mardi, le directeur de la CIA n’a donné aucun détails sur la manière dont des pirates avaient eu accès à ses emails personnels.

Il s’est borné à expliquer que bien qu’étant « un responsable gouvernemental », il avait « aussi une famille, des amis, des factures à payer, des choses à faire dans la vie quotidienne ».

Et « la manière de communiquer aujourd’hui se fait par Internet », a-t-il souligné.

Il a jugé disproportionné le traitement médiatique de l’affaire.

« Parfois il y a cette soif de rendre les choses plus sexy qu’elles ne le sont et de les faire gonfler hors de proportion », a-t-il dit.

« C’est faire la publicité d’une activité criminelle et disséminer des informations qui je pense sont inappropriées », a-t-il dit.

WikiLeaks avait notamment mis en ligne un court mémo sur l’Iran, accompagné de recommandations, adressé à l’époque au président-élu devant prendre ses fonctions en janvier 2009.

On trouve également sur son site deux documents datés de 2008 parlant de la torture, notamment une copie de loi examinée au Sénat et listant les pratiques interdites, comme la simulation de noyade (waterboarding) ou les fausses exécutions.

WikiLeaks a mis en outre en ligne une copie d’un document d’une cinquantaine de pages censé avoir été rempli par John Brennan en 2008, contenant de nombreuses informations personnelles, lors du processus de vérification de ses antécédents pour être autorisé à accéder aux informations sensibles.

John Brennan est directeur de la CIA depuis 2013.

La publication de ses e-mails était survenue quelques jours après qu’un pirate informatique se présentant comme un adolescent américain avait affirmé au tabloïd New York Post être entré dans la boîte email du directeur de la CIA et s’être emparé d’informations personnelles.

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27 octobre 2015 2 27 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
La Défense aura besoin d'un délai de deux ans pour atteindre ses objectifs (Canada)

 

26 octobre 2015 La Presse Canadienne

 

Ottawa - Le ministère de la Défense nationale peine à mettre en oeuvre un programme portant la marque du gouvernement conservateur visant à améliorer le processus opérationnel et à réduire le secteur administratif de l'armée.

 

Selon des documents obtenus par La Presse Canadienne grâce à la Loi d'accès à l'information, les responsables du Plan de renouvellement de la Défense espèrent trouver plus «d'occasions de réinvestissement» afin d'atteindre l'objectif du gouvernement d'économiser entre 750 millions $ et 1,3 milliard $ par année.

 

En éliminant des programmes redondants, le gouvernement espérait notamment attribuer l'argent économisé à l'entretien de l'équipement de première ligne.

 

Selon des notes internes, le ministère aurait besoin d'un délai supplémentaire pouvant atteindre deux ans pour la mise en oeuvre de ce plan, qui devait être complété d'ici l'exercice financier 2017-2018

 

Un sommaire préparé pour l'ancien ministre de la défense Rob Nicholson, le 16 janvier 2015, indique que seulement 146 millions $ avaient été réassignés à la fin de l'exercice financier, en mars.

 

Un porte-parole de l'équipe du renouvellement, le commandant Doug McNair, a indiqué que les sommes réaffectées avaient finalement atteint 158 millions $.

 

Il a expliqué que les premiers objectifs financiers et les délais prescrits n'étaient «qu'un estimé des économies potentielles réalisé par un consultant utilisant des données de 2012». Il a ajouté que le ministère savait que des ajustements devraient être apportés au programme.

 

«Aucun nouvel estimé ou délai n'a encore été finalisé ou approuvé, a écrit le commandant McNair dans un courriel. Nous demeurons résolus à atteindre les objectifs stratégiques du plan de renouvellement et à réinvestir les économies dans le développement de nos capacités et notre préparation opérationnelles.»

 

La refonte administrative de la Défense nationale était un des bébés du gouvernement conservateur défait aux élections du 19 octobre et, plus particulièrement de Stephen Harper. À un certain moment, M. Harper avait sermonné l'ancien ministre de la Défense, Peter MacKay, pour ne pas avoir suffisamment coupé dans le secteur administratif de l'armée.

 

M. Harper avait commandé un rapport au lieutenant-général à la retraite Andrew Leslie. Celui-ci a été élu député libéral, le 19 octobre, et pourrait être nommé au nouveau conseil des ministres par Justin Trudeau.

 

Au cours de la dernière campagne, M. Trudeau s'est engagé à mettre en place les recommandations de l'équipe de renouvellement afin «d'assurer des forces armées allégées, plus agiles et mieux équipées».

 

Une source au sein du ministère de la Défense a indiqué que le général Jon Vance, le nouveau commandant en chef des Forces armées, avait jeté tout son poids dans le processus, même si certaines directions en voyaient moins l'urgence.

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27 octobre 2015 2 27 /10 /octobre /2015 17:20
Boeing and Lockheed Martin Statement on U.S. Air Force Long Range Strike-Bomber Decision

 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 27, 2015 – Boeing.com

 

Boeing [NYSE: BA] and Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] today released the following statement on the U.S. Air Force’s decision to award Northrop Grumman the Long Range Strike-Bomber contract:

 

The Boeing and Lockheed Martin team is disappointed by today’s announcement. We will have further discussions with our customer before determining our next steps. We are interested in knowing how the competition was scored in terms of price and risk, as we believe that the combination of Boeing and Lockheed Martin offers unparalleled experience, capability and resources for this critically important recapitalization program.

 

Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company and leading manufacturer of commercial airplanes and defense, space and security systems. In addition, Boeing supports airlines and U.S. and allied government customers in more than 150 countries. The company’s products and tailored services include commercial and military aircraft, satellites, weapons, electronic and defense systems, launch systems, advanced information and communication systems, and performance-based logistics and training. Boeing employs more than 165,000 people across the United States and in more than 65 countries. Company revenues for 2014 were more than $90 billion. Follow us on Twitter: @Boeing.

 

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2014 were $45.6 billion.

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26 octobre 2015 1 26 /10 /octobre /2015 08:20
F-35 Lightning II CVN DT-II Wrap Up


23 oct. 2015 by US Navy

 

Two F-35C Lightning II aircraft from the F-35 Patuxent River Integrated Test Force (ITF) flexed their sea legs aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) during the second F-35C developmental test (DT-II) phase October 2-10, 2015. (U.S. Navy video courtesy of Lockheed Martin | Matt Short, Dane Wiedmann, Andrew McMurtrie, and Andy Wolfe.)

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23 octobre 2015 5 23 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
Close-in defense systems provide "last chance" ship defense- photo Raytheon

Close-in defense systems provide "last chance" ship defense- photo Raytheon

 

TUCSON, Ariz., Oct. 23, 2015 /PRNewswire

 

The U.S. Navy awarded Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) a $159.9 million contract to manufacture, inspect and test Phalanx Close-in Weapon Systems (CIWS).

 

Phalanx 1B encompasses the range of actions required to assure success and shape the battlespace for naval, joint, and combined forces. The contract, which provides for a $10 million option in FY15 and another valued at $291 million in FY16, includes support equipment for the Phalanx and SeaRAM Weapon Systems, Block 1B radar upgrades and kits for reliability, maintainability, and availability. The contract also covers overhaul of four Land-based Phalanx Weapon Systems. "Phalanx provides the U.S. Navy's ships with a 'last-chance' defense against anti-ship missiles and littoral warfare threats while SeaRAM extends that inner-layer battlespace," said Rick Nelson, vice president of Raytheon's Naval and Area Mission Defense product line. "Close-in systems give warfighters the ability to automatically carry out functions usually performed by separate systems on other ships." Work under the contract, which was signed in the third quarter of 2015, is expected to be completed by August 2018 in Louisville, Kentucky. This contract was announced by the Department of Defense on September, 30, 2015.

 

Close-in Defense Solutions

Phalanx is a rapid-fire, computer-controlled radar and 20 mm gun system that automatically acquires, tracks and destroys enemy threats that have penetrated all other ship defense systems. More than 890 systems have been built and deployed in navies around the world.

Intended to enlarge Phalanx's keep-out range against evolving anti-ship missiles, rotary- and fixed-wing aircraft and other threats, SeaRAM Anti-ship Missile Defense Systems use advanced Phalanx Block 1B sensors and replaces the gun with an 11-round Rolling Airframe Missile guide. SeaRAM is aboard the Independence-class of the U.S. Navy's Littoral Combat Ships.

 

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2014 sales of $23 billion and 61,000 employees worldwide, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 93 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as cybersecurity and a broad range of mission support services. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Mass. For more about Raytheon, visit us at www.raytheon.com and follow us on Twitter @Raytheon.

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16 octobre 2015 5 16 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
Surface Forces: The Zumwalts Are Fading Away

 

October 16, 2015: Harold C. Hutchison – Strategy PAge

 

The American Zumwalt class destroyers may find its production run truncated yet again, as reports indicate that the third ship of the class, Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), is on the budget chopping block. The result would leave the Navy with two of the advanced destroyers. Initially these radically new destroyers were meant to replace four Iowa-class battleships and 31 Spruance-class destroyers. The Zumwalts proved too expensive and mass production was cancelled.

 

DDG 1002 was already slated for some changes from the first two units of the class (Zumwalt and Michael Monsoor). DDG 1002 was to receive a steel deckhouse as opposed to the composite deckhouses used on the other two ships. This was meant to save money. There had also been a chance that one of the 155mm guns would be replaced with an electromagnetic railgun on DDG 1002. The electromagnetic railgun is another expensive navy effort that may see introduction delayed a long time because of cost considerations.

 

The Zumwalt class was planned to include 32 ships – more than enough to replace the 31 Spruance-class destroyers that were retired early in the 1990s and early 2000s. Armed with two 155mm guns, and 80 VLS cells while reaching a speed of up to 56 kilometers per hour, the 14,000-ton ships specifically designed to replace the Spruances in the land attack mission, which they had shifted to after the end of the Cold War. But it soon became apparent that many aspects of the Zumwalts were too ambitious. For example they were originally intended to have the Mk 110 57mm gun, but the Navy instead elected to install the cheaper and less capable Mk46 Bushmaster II, a 30mm cannon. The Zumwalts’ also incorporate a lot of automation and require a crew of only 150 but increased development and construction costs more than expected. 

 

The Zumwalt class was also hit hard by the navy budget crunch caused by so much money being shifted to the army after 2001 for operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Even before construction of the lead ship was funded in 2005, the class had been cut, first to 24, then to 7, then to 3, as costs kept climbing and navy requests for larger budgets went unanswered. The thing is, cutting the production run had the perverse effect of making the Zumwalt’s cost problems increase. Spreading the R&D cost of $9.6 billion over the original 32 ships would have only added $300 million to the price of each ship. By cutting the program to three units, each ship now shoulders $3.2 billion of the R&D costs.

 

Would the Zumwalt class have been a success? Two other high-tech programs that were truncated early, the F-22 and Seawolf-class submarine, indicating the answer might have been “Yes.” Instead, the Zumwalt will be widely derided as a failure, when the blame rests not on the designers or the Navy, but instead the budget-cutters. Meanwhile, the Navy will have a hard time finding enough hulls in the water to handle the many missions it will have.

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