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14 octobre 2015 3 14 /10 /octobre /2015 06:20
Last of 12 GPS IIF Satellites Arrive at Cape Canaveral for Processing

 

Oct 9, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Air Force

 

The last Air Force GPS IIF in a block of 12 satellites was delivered to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, from Boeing's manufacturing facility in El Segundo, California, Oct. 8 via a C-17 Globemaster III. A crowd from the government and industry partnership, who will complete the satellite's final assembly, gathered on the Cape's "Skid Strip" to watch the off-loading of the satellite they will prepare to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance rocket in 2016.

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
La Défense nationale cherche un pirate pour rentrer dans ses systèmes automobiles

 

par

 

La Défense nationale a lancé un appel d’offres afin que des experts informatiques vérifient la cybersécurité de certains de ses systèmes automobiles.

 

L’appel d’offres note que dans les voitures et les camions actuels, l’informatique est omniprésente.

Ainsi, une voiture fabriquée en 2014 peut contenir jusqu’à 100 ordinateurs (modules de commande électronique [MCE]) qui exécutent 60 millions de lignes de codes et gèrent 145 actionneurs et 75 capteurs. Ces modules de commande peuvent échanger jusqu’à 25 Go de données par heure sur le bus de communications internes du véhicule.

De plus, les véhicules automobiles sont interreliés plus que jamais auparavant au moyen de nombreuses interfaces de communications câblées et sans fil avec des éléments externes.

Ce qui inquiète les Forces armées canadiennes, c’est qu’au cours des trois dernières années, plusieurs pirates informatiques ont réussi à compromettre la cybersécurité de certains véhicules.

Si en général, les cyberattaques visant des technologies de l’information comme les ordinateurs personnels et les serveurs entraînent surtout des dommages immatériels comme la perte, la modification ou le vol d’information ou d’argent, ainsi que la perturbation des activités, le piratage d’un système des véhicule compromet la sécurité des passagers ou d’autres usagers de la route.

Comme les Forces armées canadiennes utilisent un large éventail de véhicules, elles souhaitent donc que des experts étudient la «sécurité des véhicules automobiles et inclure la compréhension des vulnérabilités et l’examen des mesures d’atténuation possibles».

Les travaux seront exécutés à Valcartier, puisqu’un des moyens de récolter les informations est l’utilisation d’un logiciel développé par RDDC Valcartier et que le véhicule (une camionnette) se trouve là-bas.

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
photo Lockheed Martin

photo Lockheed Martin


12 oct. 2015 by Lockheed Martin

 

The U-2 Dragon Lady goes through Lockheed Martin Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) every 4,800 flight hours or every seven years. PDM involves the complete disassembly, inspection, repair and reassembly of the entire aircraft; ensuring its longevity and ability to fly at today's record-high operational rates. This thorough maintenance allows Lockheed Martin to collect data on airframe integrity, confirming that nearly 80 percent lifespan remains on the aircraft. The U-2 collects critical targets no other platform can, flying faster, deeper and with greater reliability compared to any high-altitude ISR aircraft since the SR-71.

Learn more: http://lockheedmartin.com/us/products...

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
Sailors replace 20mm dummy ammunition, left, with tunsten 20mm rounds on a Phalanx weapon. Photo by PH1 Tina M. Ackerman/ U.S. Navy

Sailors replace 20mm dummy ammunition, left, with tunsten 20mm rounds on a Phalanx weapon. Photo by PH1 Tina M. Ackerman/ U.S. Navy

 

DULLES, Va., Oct. 12 By Richard Tomkins   (UPI)

 

Orbital ATK is producing medium- and large-caliber ammunition under multiple U.S. Army contracts.

 

Orbital ATK is to produces medium- and large-caliber ammunition for the U.S. military and allied nations under a U.S. Army contracts worth $105 million. The orders from the U.S. Army Project Manager Maneuver Ammunition Systems are for 20mm, 25mm and 30mm tactical and target practice ammunition for air, sea and land weapons platforms and 120mm tactical and training ammunition for the Abrams Main Battle Tank. "We are committed to being the partner of choice for the production and development of ammunition for a wide variety of combat systems," said Dan Olson, vice president and general manager of Orbital ATK's Armament Systems Division of the Defense Systems Group. "Our contributions to the soldier are to provide a continuous supply of ammunition for training and tactical use, and to develop ammunition that provides a distinct combat advantage for those defending their nation's security."

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
The U.S. Marines' G/ATOR radar system. Photo Northrop Grumman

The U.S. Marines' G/ATOR radar system. Photo Northrop Grumman

 

BALTIMORE, Oct. 12 By Richard Tomkins   (UPI)

 

A capability to detect and target ground-based weapon threats by the U.S. Marines' G/ATOR radar system is to be developed by Northrop Grumman.

 

The U.S. Marine Corp has tapped Northrop Grumman to develop and test a ground weapon locating capability for its AN/TPS-80 radar system. The AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar, or G/ATOR, is a ground-based active electronically scanned array radar system from Northrop Grumman with a scalable open system architecture and a compatibility with other U.S. command-and-control systems. Under the software upgrade contract, which is worth more than $58.7 million, Marines operators of the C/ATOR system will have a common hardware solution with the ability to switch between air surveillance, air defense, ground weapon locating, and air traffic.

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
Defense Intelligence Agency Awards Leidos Prime Contract

 

RESTON, Va., Oct. 6, 2015 /PRNewswire

 

Leidos (NYSE: LDOS), a national security, health and engineering solutions company, was awarded a prime contract by the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) to provide enhanced solutions for information technology (IT) requirements. The multiple-award indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity has a one-year base period of performance, four one-year options, and a total contract value of $6 billion for all awardees, if all options are exercised. Leidos is one of 25 large businesses eligible to compete for task orders under the contract. Work will be performed in Springfield, Va. and at DIA locations worldwide.

The DIA provides military intelligence to warfighters, defense policymakers and force planners in the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community in support of U.S. military planning, operations and weapon systems acquisition.  Under the contract, Leidos will provide worldwide coverage for IT requirements and technical services supporting the government through system design, development, fielding and sustainment of global intelligence and command and control (C2) assets vital to the security of the United States. Leidos will focus on improving integration, information sharing, gaining efficiencies and information safeguarding through a common IT approach.

"This E-Site contract will build upon our successful SITE contract performance.  We look forward to maintaining our current worldwide coverage of IT requirements and technical support services for the government by continuing to provide innovative, adaptive and secure services and capabilities in support of the DIA and the intelligence community," said Leidos Group President, Sam Gordy.

 

About Leidos

Leidos is a science and technology solutions leader working to address some of the world's toughest challenges in national security, health and engineering. The Company's 19,000 employees support vital missions for government and the commercial sector, develop innovative solutions to drive better outcomes and defend our digital and physical infrastructure from 'new world' threats. Headquartered in Reston, Virginia, Leidos reported annual revenues of approximately $5.06 billion for its fiscal year ended January 30, 2015. For more information, visit www.Leidos.com

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13 octobre 2015 2 13 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
Marines load ammunition into an Abrams tank. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John M. McCall.

Marines load ammunition into an Abrams tank. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John M. McCall.

Marines load ammunition into an Abrams tank. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John M. McCall.

 

DULLES, Va., Oct. 9 By Richard Tomkins (UPI)

 

Orbital is to develop a new 120mm multi-purpose round for tanks under a first-phase development contract from the U.S. Army.

 

Next-generation, multi-purpose 120 millimeter ammunition is to be developed for U.S. Abrams tanks by Orbital ATK. The U.S. Army contract for first-phase development work is worth $16 million. "Our ammunition innovations like advanced kinetic energy penetrators and airbursting munitions are providing combat overmatch for our warfighters -- which is our company's mission," said Dan Olson, vice president and general manager for Orbital ATK's Armament Systems division, of the Defense Systems Group. "Our ability to innovate comes from a long history of creating new capabilities for existing systems through our expertise in fuzing, warheads and platform integration." Orbital ATK said the 120mm Advanced Multi-Purpose, XM1147 High Explosive Multi-Purpose with Tracer cartridge will replace four existing rounds, including those for defeating armor and breaching reinforced walls.

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12 octobre 2015 1 12 /10 /octobre /2015 16:50
Everything the light touches


22.09.2015  photo by Cpl. Justin T. Updegraff - U.S. Marine Corps

 

An M1 Abrams main battle tank provides security during the Combined Arms Company field exercise at Novo Selo Training Area, Bulgaria, Sept. 16, 2015. The CAC is a newly formed armor element supporting the Black Sea Rotational Force.

 

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12 octobre 2015 1 12 /10 /octobre /2015 12:20
MV-22 Osprey at Morón Air Base - photo US DoD

MV-22 Osprey at Morón Air Base - photo US DoD

 

12.10.2015 Par Murielle Delaporte – V.A.

 

High-tech. Mi-avion, mi-hélicoptère, le “convertible” de transport tactique Bell Boeing V-22 a révolutionné les méthodes du combat aéromobile dans les forces américaines. Nous sommes montés à bord de cet aéronef futuriste. Reportage.

 

Aux commandes de son appareil, le colonel Michael Orr, commandant de l’escadron d’essai VMX-22 (Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 22), s’exerce inlassablement à l’approche tactique d’une zone censée être en territoire hostile : une bonne vingtaine d’atterrissages et de décollages effectués en boucle sur une petite prairie située au milieu des bois, quelque part en Caroline du Nord. Autant d’approches différentes permettant de tromper l’ennemi et d’échapper à une éventuelle menace sol-air — canons, mitrailleuses et autres missiles —, autant d’options rendues possibles par la technologie unique de ce curieux hybride d’hélicoptère et d’avion qu’est le V-22 Osprey… Pour les personnels habitués au Transall, le vieux cheval de bataille du transport tactique français, le seul point commun de la manoeuvre est le degré de nausée que peuvent parfois ressentir les passagers — dont l’auteur de ces lignes, bien que très confortablement assise sur la banquette latérale arrière… L’expérience s’avère vraiment unique lorsque, à pleine puissance, le V-22 s’arrache littéralement du sol, avec vue plongeante par la rampe de soute demeurée béante !

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11 octobre 2015 7 11 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
Student sensor operators from the 6th Reconnaissance Squadron practice tactical operations during an MQ-1 Predator super sortie simulator mission. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman BreeAnn Sachs.

Student sensor operators from the 6th Reconnaissance Squadron practice tactical operations during an MQ-1 Predator super sortie simulator mission. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman BreeAnn Sachs.

 

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M., Oct. 8 (UPI)

 

The U.S. Air Force is expanding its training program for remotely piloted aircraft at the Holloman Air Force Base, including the MQ-1 Predator and the MQ-9 Reaper, officials announced Wednesday.

The announcement comes as the U.S. Air Force reports increased demand for its remotely piloted aircraft for surveillance, reconnaissance, and intelligence gathering operations. The Holloman Air Force Base is set to increase its rate of student production from 603 pilots and sensor operators in fiscal year 2015, to 818 students in fiscal 2016.

"By the time we are done with this expansion, Holloman will be the largest aircrew training base in the Air Force," said Maj. Christopher, the assistant director of operations for programmed flying training in a statement.

It will take a bout 18 months for the Air Force to train and expand the unit, taking into account training new instructors and expanding student facilities. Christopher added it takes about six months to train a new instructor. Air Force officials say the expansion will help fix manning and maintenance issues with the remotely piloted aircraft. Christopher says the solution is not a quick fix for the challenges students have had, however the easier workload will be better for the RPA community.

"This seems like leadership is truly focused on a long-term sustainable fix that is going to keep the RPA community healthy as a whole and keep us there," Christopher said. "It is going to hurt for a little while because we have got a lot of work to do, but the demand is still there and we need to do our best to meet that."

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10 octobre 2015 6 10 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
Reaper Extended Range (Reaper ER) - photo General Atomics

Reaper Extended Range (Reaper ER) - photo General Atomics

 

October 8, 2015: Strategy Page

 

In September 2015 the U.S. Air Force received its first MQ-9 Reaper ER UAV. This occurred a year after the air force ordered 38 of them. Reaper ER is an upgrade of the original MQ-9 design that allows longer endurance (up to 35 hours) by carrying two fuel tanks (one under each wing) that use a new fuel management system that ensures fuel is taken from the main fuel tank and the two external tanks in such a way that the aircraft does not become unbalanced. The new version also has the engine modified so that it can generate more power on takeoff, enabling the MQ-9 to achieve heavier takeoff weight. The ER version is also getting 20 percent longer wings. Since the wings already carry fuel, this helps increase fuel and endurance to about 42 hours. The air force asked for the Reaper ER to be developed and delivered quickly which in this case was done. That was unusual in the military procurement world. Older MQ-9s can be upgraded to ER partially (by equipping a MQ-9 with the two fuel tanks and fuel management software) or completely (by installing the larger wings and new engine).

 

The original MQ-9 Reaper looked like the earlier 1.2 ton MQ-1 Predator but was larger. The 4.7 ton MQ-9 is an 11.6 meters (36 foot) long aircraft with a 21.3 meters (66 foot) wingspan. It has six hard points and can carry 682 kg (1,500 pounds) of weapons. These include Hellfire missiles (up to eight), two Sidewinder or two AMRAAM air-to-air missiles, two Maverick missiles, or two 227 kg (500 pound) smart bombs (laser or GPS guided). Max speed is 400 kilometers an hour, and max endurance was originally 15 hours. The Reaper is considered a combat aircraft, to replace F-16s or A-10s in many situations. Most of the nearly 150 Reapers built so far have been for the U.S. Air Force and since introduced in 2007 these Reapers have flown over two million hours.

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9 octobre 2015 5 09 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
photo ULA

photo ULA


Oct 9, 2015 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: United Launch Alliance; issued Oct 8, 2015)

 

VANDENBERG AFB, Calif. --- A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying a payload for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and 13 CubeSats lifted off from Space Launch Complex-3 Oct. 8 at 5:49 a.m. PDT. Designated NROL-55, the mission is in support of national defense. This is ULA's 10th launch in 2015 and the 101st successful launch since the company was formed in December 2006.

"Congratulations on today's successful launch of NROL-55! ULA is honored to have collaborated with the NRO Office of Space Launch and the Air Force on the integration and launch of the NROL-55 spacecraft to orbit with our Atlas V vehicle," said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Atlas and Delta Programs. "Launches like this only happen with exceptional teamwork by an extremely talented team and a one-launch-at-a-time focus on mission success."

The Atlas V rocket also delivered 13 Government Rideshare Advanced Concepts Experiment (GRACE) CubeSats to orbit. The nine NRO-sponsored CubeSats and four NASA-sponsored CubeSats were mounted to the Aft-Bulkhead Carrier located on the back end of the Centaur upper stage.

"The GRACE CubeSats will perform missions demonstrating tracking technologies, software-defined radio communications and will also conduct other measurements and experiments," said Sponnick. "We are happy that ULA could play a part in bringing these nano-satellites to orbit along with the NRO payload through a cost-effective rideshare."

The 13 CubeSats were developed by Aerospace Corporation, the Army's Space and Missile Defense Center, Tyvak, SRI International, the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Salish Kootenai College, AMSAT and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Weighing 1-5 kilograms, they are developed, launched and controlled at a fraction of the cost of a typical operating satellite.

The NRO payload and GRACE CubeSats were launched aboard an Atlas V Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) 401 configuration vehicle, which includes a 4-meter-diameter payload fairing. The Atlas booster for this mission was powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 engine and the Centaur upper stage was powered by the Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10C-1 engine.

ULA's next launch is the Atlas V Global Positioning System (GPS) IIF-11 satellite for the U.S. Air Force, scheduled for Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex-41 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

The EELV program was established by the U.S. Air Force to provide assured access to space for Department of Defense and other government payloads. The commercially developed EELV program supports the full range of government mission requirements, while delivering on schedule and providing significant cost savings over the heritage launch systems.


With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation's most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has successfully delivered more than 100 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the field, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system.

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9 octobre 2015 5 09 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
photo US Air Force

photo US Air Force

 

4 octobre 2015 par Frédéric Lert - Aerobuzz.fr

 

Soixante ans après le premier vol de l’avion espion, Lockheed Martin propose de revisiter son U-2 pour en faire un appareil furtif et piloté optionnellement. Pas certain que l’US Air Force morde à l’hameçon…

 

Le U-2 a donc passé le cap symbolique des soixante ans cet été. Le tout premier appareil dessiné par le bureau d’études Skunk Works et Clarence « Kelly » Johnson, ingénieur de légende de Lockheed, avait pris l’air pour la première fois le 1er août 1955. Le U-2 avait été développé très rapidement parce que le besoin exprimé était simple : à l’époque où les satellites n’existaient pas, il fallait tout simplement voler le plus haut possible en emportant un appareil photo. L’appareil avait pris l’air après moins d’un an de développement, pour un coût inférieur de 15% à l’enveloppe prévue. Ca fait rêver…On est d’accord que les U-2S qui volent aujourd’hui sous les couleurs de l’USAF n’ont plus grand chose en commun avec l’ancêtre de la Guerre Froide. Un peu comme la Golf VII d’aujourd’hui et celle de 1974 : le nom et la forme sont toujours là, mais à l’intérieur on a changé d’ère…

 

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9 octobre 2015 5 09 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
Alcoa Wins Titanium Contract with Lockheed Martin for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter

 

Oct 7, 2015 ASDNews Source : Alcoa

 

Lightweight metals leader Alcoa today announced a contract to supply titanium for Lockheed Martin’s (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II aircraft program, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). Under the contract, Alcoa becomes the titanium supplier for airframe structures for all three variants of the F-35 over nine years, from 2016 to 2024. At current projected build rates, the contract has an estimated value of approximately $1.1 billion.

 

Alcoa will supply titanium plate and billet from several operations gained through the RTI International Metals acquisition.

 

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9 octobre 2015 5 09 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
Credits US Army

Credits US Army

 

Oct 8, 2015 | by Caroline Rees unmannedsystemstechnology.com

 

US Army Counter-UAV TechnologyThe US Army has announced that it has successfully demonstrated its latest counter-UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) technology, shooting down two unmanned aircraft as part of their demonstration. Although the research project began with the objective to counter rockets, artillery and mortars, the project scope was expanded to include unmanned aerial threats.

 

“Every country has drones now, whether they are armed or not or what level of performance. This is a huge threat that has been coming up on everybody. It has kind of almost sneaked up on people, and it’s almost more important than the counter-RAM threat,” said Manfredi Luciano, project officer for the Enhanced Area Protection and Survivability, or EAPS, Army Technology Objective. The technology is being developed by the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC, at Picatinny Arsenal. Funding for development and testing was provided by the ARDEC Technology Office. The challenge has grown exponentially in the last decade as the world’s inventory of unmanned aircraft systems has grown from approximately 20 system types and 800 aircraft in 1999, to more than 200 system types and approximately 10,000 unmanned aircraft in 2010, according to Nancy Elliott, a spokeswoman with the U.S. Army’s Fires Center of Excellence on Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

 

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 16:20
GPS III Launch Services RFP Released by Air Force

 

Oct 06, 2015 (SPX)

 

Los Angeles AFB CA - The Air Force released a final Request for Proposal (RFP) for Global Positioning System (GPS) III Launch Services, Sept. 30. Launch services include launch vehicle production, mission integration and launch operations for a GPS III mission scheduled to launch in 2018. Proposals are due back to the Air Force no later than Nov. 16 in accordance with the solicitation instructions.

 

After evaluating proposals through a competitive, best-value source selection process, the Air Force will award a firm-fixed price contract that will provide the government with a total launch solution for the GPS III satellite. The Air Force's acquisition strategy for this solicitation achieves a balance between mission success, meeting operational needs, lowering launch costs, and reintroducing competition for National Security Space missions.

 

"Through this competitive solicitation for GPS III launch services, we hope to reintroduce competition in order to promote innovation and reduce cost to the taxpayer while maintaining our steadfast laser focus on mission assurance and assured access to space," said Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, Space and Missile Systems Center commander and Air Force Program Executive Officer for Space.

 

This will be a standalone contract for one GPS III launch. GPS III is the next generation of GPS satellites that will introduce new capabilities to meet the higher demands of both military and civilian users.

 

GPS III is expected to provide improved anti-jamming capabilities as well as improved accuracy for precision navigation and timing. It will incorporate the common L1C signal which is compatible with the European Space Agency's Galileo global navigation satellite system and compliment current services with the addition of new civil and military signals.

 

This is the first of nine competitive launch services planned in the FY 2016 President's Budget Request under the current Phase 1A procurement strategy, which covers awards with FY 2015-2017 funding. The next solicitation for launch services will be for a second GPS III mission.

 

The Phase 1A procurement strategy reintroduces competition for national security space launch services. Under the previous Phase 1 strategy, United Launch Alliance (ULA) was the only certified launch provider. In 2013, ULA was awarded a sole-source contract for launch services as part of an Air Force "block buy" of 36 rocket cores that resulted in significant savings for the government through FY 2017.

 

In May, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) was certified for EELV launches resulting in two launch service providers that are qualified to design, produce, qualify, and deliver a launch capability and provide the mission assurance support required to deliver national security space satellites to orbit.

 

"With the recent certification of SpaceX, we now have multiple launch service providers that can service critical NSS missions. Reintroducing competition into EELV will ultimately save taxpayer dollars and increase assured access to space. " said Dr. Claire Leon, director of SMC's Launch Enterprise Directorate.

 

"As part of this reintroduction of competition, we've been working with our industry partners to develop and finalize this RFP," said Dr. Leon. "Their feedback has been critical to developing the criteria for this source selection and how we are innovating government processes to better match commercial processes as directed by OSD's Better Buying Power 3.0. This is an exciting time in NSS launch acquisitions."

 

The Air Force Space Command's Space and Missile Systems Center, located at the Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the U.S. Air Force's center of excellence for acquiring and developing military space systems. Its portfolio includes the Global Positioning System, military satellite communications, defense meteorological satellites, space launch and range systems, satellite control networks, space based infrared systems and space situational awareness capabilities.

 

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
E-8C Joint STARS (Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System).jpg

E-8C Joint STARS (Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System).jpg

 

Oct 6, 2015 by Ryan Maass(UPI)

 

Washington - U.S. Air Force officials worry the planned recapitalization of the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System, or JSTARS, will have to be canceled due to budget restrictions.

 

William LaPlante, assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, spoke to reporters at an event hosted by Defense One on Tuesday, saying the plan might not happen at all.

 

"It's a budget issue, so it depends on the sequester and where the priorities are in the department," LaPlante told Defense News. "It might not happen at all."

 

Budgets for defense contracts and other military operations have also been impacted by the passage of continuing resolutions by lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Partisan debates on government funding for various programs, including defense, threatened to force a government shutdown in early October, which may have forced government defense and security employees, including troops, to have their pay suspended.

 

The passage of another CR kept the government open until December.

 

The acquisition process for JSTARS was delayed by the Pentagon in late September, following a review of its budget. The system is designed to enable the Air Force to provide ground troops with surveillance and tactical information.

 

Thus far, the Air Force has not yet detailed what more work needs to be done.

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 11:20
Avion ravitailleur KC-46 de Boeing développé pour l’US Air Force qui en a commandé 179 – photo Boeing

Avion ravitailleur KC-46 de Boeing développé pour l’US Air Force qui en a commandé 179 – photo Boeing

 

07 octobre 2015 Par Julien Bonnet – Usine Nouvelle

 

Le futur ravitailleur de l’US Air Force, le KC-46 Pegasus de Boeing, a effectué son premier vol le 25 septembre dernier entre Everett et Seattle au nord-ouest des Etats-Unis. L’armée américaine en a commandé 179 exemplaires. Objectif : remplacer ses (KC-135) Stratotanker développés dans les années 50 et qui lui coûte plusieurs milliards de dollars chaque année pour les maintenir en service.

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
Projet Resolve: «Astérix» le futur ravitailleur que doit fournir la Davie à la Marine est en route pour le Canada

Le projet Resolve de Chantier Davie prévoit une solution alternative pour palier le retard dans la livraison des navires ravitailleurs de la Marine royale canadienne: acheter un navire de type porte-conteneur qui, une fois démantelé, sera transformé en ravitailleur au chantier Davie, à Lévis, dans la circonscription du ministre canadien de la Sécurité publique, Steven Blaney. (Davieshipbuilding)

 

 

6 octobre 2015 par - 45eNord.ca

 

Astérix, le navire commercial acheté par le chantier maritime Davie de Lévis de la Rive-Sud de Québec dans le cadre du projet Resolve, est maintenant en route pour le Canada et les travail initial visant à en faire un navire de ravitaillement pour la Marine royale canadienne devrait commencer incessamment.

En juin dernier, devant le retard dans la livraison des ravitailleurs, le gouvernement canadien s’est entendu avec le chantier Davie sur le réaménagement d’un navire commercial à des fins militaires, d’ici à ce que les navires fabriqués par la Seaspan de Vancouver soient prêts, comme le lui avait proposé le chantier de Lévis quelques mois auparavant.

D’ici à ce que le chantier de Vancouver puisse livrer les ravitailleurs, en 2020 pour le premier et en 2021 pour le second, la marine royale canadienne pourra réaliser ses missions au courant des prochaines années grâce à ce ravitailleur « provisoire » que lui livrera la Davie.

D’ici là, des ententes ont été conclues avec l’Espagne et le Chili pour fournir aux membres de la MRC l’occasion de poursuivre leur instruction sur le ravitaillement en mer à bord de navires espagnols et chiliens en attendant l’arrivée des nouveaux navires de ravitaillement canadiens.

Chantier maritime Davis va maintenant rénover Astérix et le transformer en un véritable navire de ravitaillement pour ensuite le fournir à la Marine royale canadienne en vertu d’un contrat de location.

Les discussions sont toutefois toujours en cours sur les détails la proposition finale qui doit encore recevoir l’approbation du Conseil du Trésor, dans qu’on sache exactement quant les deux parties en arriveront à une entente finale. Le gouvernement canadien et la Davie devront, notamment, s’entendre sur la longueur ( 5 ou 7 ans) du bail de location du navire.

La Davie a cependant déjà reçu de l’argent du gouvernement canadien pour amorcer le projet.

Le navire arrivera incessamment au chantier Aecon de Pictou, en Nouvelle-Écosse, où les ingénieurs de projet Resolve, devraient commencer le travail initial. De là, le navire sera envoyé aux chantiers Davie avant l’hiver.

Le navire sera ensuite transféré plus tard sur la côte Ouest où seront installés les systèmes récupérés sur le NCSM Protecteur . Le système de ravitaillement en mer (RAS) n’avait en effet pas été endommagé par l’incendie de 2014 qui a mené au retrait au Protecteur.

Et, finalement,on passera aux essais en mer de l’Astérix qui se dérouleront eux aussi sur la côte Ouest.

En tout, l’ensemble du processus ne devrait prendre qu’environ 15 mois à compter de la date de signature du contrat, selon Chantier maritime Lévis.

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
photo Lockheed Martin

photo Lockheed Martin

 

05 October, 2015 BY: James Drew – FG

 

Washington DC - Lockheed Martin’s F-35 has not yet seen combat, but already the defence manufacturer is exploring “concepts” for installing and employing a high-power fibre laser weapon on the new-generation combat jet for shooting down missiles and other airborne threats.

 

The company believes it finally has the right technology to produce modular and scalable fibre laser weapons for trucks, ships and aircraft, and a high-power, 60kW example will enter production for the US Army later this month. The F-35 has been in development since 2001 and only recently was declared fit for combat with the US Marine Corps. However, Lockheed’s Rob Afzal says company engineers are already thinking about how a laser weapon system could fit onto the supersonic stealth fighter and its usefulness in combat. “Absolutely, we’re looking at concepts for the integration of a laser weapon onto the F-35,” the Lockheed senior fellow for laser and sensor systems said at a media briefing 5 October. “We’re also looking at the utility and doing models and calculations so you would understand the utility of a leaser weapon system in the F-35.”

 

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile photo USS Gridley / US Navy

Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile photo USS Gridley / US Navy

 

SAN NICOLAS ISLAND, Calif., Oct. 6 (UPI)

 

The U.S. Navy's networked Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile has demonstrated new capabilities in a special test conducted with missile-maker Raytheon. In the test, a missile was launched from the destroyer USS Gridley carrying a camera, and captured battle damage indication imagery and then transmitted the image to fleet headquarters with a two-way UHF SATCOM datalink. The missile then engaged in a loiter pattern to await further instructions. Strike controllers at the U.S. Fifth Fleet headquarters in Bahrain retargeted the missile to a new aim point on a Navy range off the coast of California, which it successfully struck.

 

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 07:20
A truck is disabled by a Lockheed Martin laser weapon. Photo Lockheed Martin

A truck is disabled by a Lockheed Martin laser weapon. Photo Lockheed Martin

 

Oct 6, 2015 by Richard Tomkins. (UPI)

 

Bothell, Wash - A modular, high-power laser is being built for use from a U.S. Army vehicle by Lockheed Martin.

 

The 60-kilowatt fiber modules system is the first of a new generation of lasers that enters production this month at the company's facility in Washington State.

 

The system's modular laser design will allow the laser's power to be varied across a wide range -- from 60 kW to 120 kW -- depending on the specific mission and threat, Lockheed Martin said.

 

"A robust laser system with minimal operational down-time results from the integration of modular fiber-based lasers," said Iain Mckinnie, business development lead for Laser Sensors and Systems, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. "With modular lasers, the possibility of a complete system failure due to a single-point disruption is dramatically lessened."

 

Lockheed Martin said its laser combines multiple fiber modules to generate an intense laser beam. The layered approach reduces the chance for mission disruption as a result of a component failure, maintenance or repair time is also reduced.

 

"Laser weapons provide a compliment to traditional kinetic weapons in the battlefield," Lockheed Martin said. "In the future, they will offer reliable protection against threats such as swarms of drones or large numbers of rockets and mortars."

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 06:50
A Sniper targeting pod attached to a U.S. Air Force B-1 bomber. U.S. Air Force photo.

A Sniper targeting pod attached to a U.S. Air Force B-1 bomber. U.S. Air Force photo.

 

Oct. 6, 2015 By Richard Tomkins (UPI)

 

Sniper Advanced Targeting Pods from Lockheed Martin are being supplied to the Royal Netherlands Air Force.

 

ORLANDO, Fla -- The Royal Netherlands Air Force is to equip its fleet of F-16 aircraft with Sniper advanced targeting pods from Lockheed Martin. A contract for 29 of the multi-mission systems was issued through the Netherlands Defense Materiel Organization and includes support equipment, training and sustainment. "Expedited delivery will enable the Royal Netherlands Air Force to rapidly deploy Sniper ATP to support current mission requirements," said Rich Lovette, director of Sniper international programs at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "Maintaining a high availability rate through our award-winning sustainment program will also ensure the Sniper ATPs remain operational for warfighters."

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 06:20
U.S. Air Force Major Kevin Hall goes through his pre-flight checks before flying an F-35A at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Hall is an F-35 test pilot. Photo by Airman 1st Class Joshua D. King/USAF

U.S. Air Force Major Kevin Hall goes through his pre-flight checks before flying an F-35A at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Hall is an F-35 test pilot. Photo by Airman 1st Class Joshua D. King/USAF

 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 5 (UPI)

 

U.S. lawmakers and defense officials are concerned as more tests on the F-35 joint-strike fighter reveal more complications than they thought.

Defense News reports the concerns stem from the testing of the new Martin-Baker US16E ejection seat system, which testers discovered may put pilots at risk of fatal injury. During the tests, ejections performed during low-speed flights showed test dummies snapping their necks.

Test results revealed that when lighter pilots are operating the F-35, the Martin-Baker seats rotate too much. The U.S. military now prohibits pilots weighting under 136 pounds from operating the F-35.

In response to the potentially grim test results, some lawmakers are calling for increased oversight of the joint-strike fighter program. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., a member of the House Armed Services Committee, said the Pentagon is erroneously rushing the program.

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8 octobre 2015 4 08 /10 /octobre /2015 06:20
Lockheed Martin's PAC-3 MSE interceptor at launch. Photo: Lockheed Martin.

Lockheed Martin's PAC-3 MSE interceptor at launch. Photo: Lockheed Martin.

 

Oct. 6, 2015 By Richard Tomkins (UPI)

 

Lockheed Martin delivers first enhanced PAC-3 missile interceptors to the U.S. Army.

 

DALLAS-- The U.S. Army has received its first enhanced range and improved mobility Patriot 3 interceptor missiles from Lockheed Martin. The Patriot Advanced Capability Missile Segment Enhancement, or PAC-3 MSE, interceptors were delivered Oct. 5, the company said, but the number involved was not disclosed. "We are proud to deliver these interceptors to the U.S. Army and are confident the men and women of the armed forces can count on the PAC-3 MSE when it matters most," said Scott Arnold, vice president of PAC-3 programs at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control.

 

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