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31 octobre 2015 6 31 /10 /octobre /2015 12:30
Turkey hopes to fly SOM-J in late 2016, targeting F-35 Block 4.2

 

26 October, 2015 By James Drew – FG

 

Washington DC  - Turkish missile maker Roketsan is hoping to fly its SOM-J cruise missile for the first time “possibly late next year” ahead of planned integration with the F-16 Block 40 by 2018 and the Lockheed Martin F-35 sometime later.

 

SOM-J is essentially a scaled-down version of Roketsan’s SOM (stand off missile), and sized for internal carriage on the F-35. SOM is already integrated with Turkey’s F-16 Block 40 and F-4E fighter jets, whereas the semi-armour-piercing SOM-J will become the nation’s cruise missile of choice once Ankara introduces the low-observable F-35 into its combat force. One company official, who spoke to Flightglobal at a recent US Army conference in Washington but declined to be named, says most of the SOM subsystems including the multi-mode seeker have already been tested and qualified and the new development effort its mostly about adapting the missile for internal carriage on the F-35, such as changing the outer mould line. He says the first flight could happen as soon as late 2016, and Turkey has requested integration with the F-35 as part of the planned Block 4.2 modernisation package. “We rely on our experience and our qualification results we already have with the existing system,” he says. “This is based on the existing design.”

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4 octobre 2015 7 04 /10 /octobre /2015 11:30
Industry Officials: Ankara's Foreign Policy Has Cost Turkish Firms $2.5B

 

October 3, 2015 By Burak Ege Bekdil – Defense News

 

ANKARA — A senior Turkish industry official who coordinates efforts to win back Arabian Gulf markets does not hide his admiration for the country’s foreign policy calculus, calling it  “one with a character.” But he admits that the policy has cost the local defense industry US $2.5 billion in lost contracts with neighboring Muslim countries.

 

Hakan Kurt is general coordinator for High-Tech Port, which brings together 67 top Turkish defense companies, most from the aerospace, naval systems, information technology, missile systems, defense engineering and armored vehicles sectors. High-Tech Port companies will display their systems at an eponymous exhibition in Qatar Oct. 6-8, hoping to penetrate further into the lucrative Arabian Gulf markets.

 

“Only in one shot, Roketsan lost a $700 million contract,” Kurt said,  declining to name the  country from which the state-controlled missile maker would have won that contract. 

 

“Democracy or not, we are not responsible for the [monarchic] regimes in Gulf countries," he said. "For us, they represent lucrative future markets.”

 

Turkish companies that come under the corporate identity of High-Tech Port target exports to Gulf countries worth $5 billion in the next 10 years and $20 billion in the next 20 years. They hope Qatar will play the role of a bridge to export indigenous systems to the region. Prospective Gulf markets include Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, which are considered the most promising sources of new business for Turkish companies, and Qatar, Turkey's closest regional ally. Early this year Turkey and Qatar signed a comprehensive military accord that gives both countries the right to deploy soldiers in each other’s territory and includes cooperation in military training, defense industry and joint military drills.

 

Turkey’s defense exports in 2014 rose 17.7 percent to an all-time high of $1.65 billion. They were at a mere $600 million in 2008.

 

Since the immediate aftermath of the Arab Spring of 2010-12, Turkey has opted for an assertive regional foreign policy, trying to help build Muslim Brotherhood-backed or similar democratically elected Islamist governments in Arab countries. Ankara also downgraded in 2010 its diplomatic ties with former ally Israel. Many analysts observe that Turkey’s regional policies are deeply pro-Muslim Brotherhood, anti-Israeli and sectarian, favoring Sunni groups against Shiite.

 

“Many Arab countries today view Turkey as a liability rather than an asset despite common religion,” said one London-based Middle East expert. “It may take Turkey several years to build meaningful alliances in the region.”

 

In Syria, Turkey strongly advocates the downfall of President Bashar al-Assad. The two neighbors do not have diplomatic relations. In Egypt, Turkey supports the ousted Muslim Brotherhood President Mohammad Morsi and does not recognize the legitimacy of incumbent President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

 

The government does not agree that its policy in the region has had any effect on Turkish companies' contracts or lack thereof among Arab countries.

 

“We don’t see a direct link between our regional policy and defense sales," a Turkish Foreign Ministry official said. "Our defense and related exports [in general] have been on the rise before, during and after the Arab Spring."

 

One senior Turkish defense company official said that  Turkey's diplomatic rows with Egypt cost his company a $250 million contract in Egypt.

 

Two of Turkey’s Shiite-dominated neighbors, Iran and Iraq, view Turkey with deep suspicion because of its pro-Sunni sectarian policies. So does multi-religious Lebanon.

 

In north Africa, both Tunisia’s government and Libya’s officially recognized government maintain distant relations  with Turkey’s ruling Islamist party, the Justice and Development Party.

 

Similarly, Turkey’s pro-Muslim Brotherhood policies have pushed Gulf countries Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) away from its industrial sphere of influence. In contrast, Qatar has remained Turkey’s best regional ally since the beginning of the Arab Spring.

 

“By a simple count, you can easily reach the conclusion that Turkey’s foreign policy over the past five years has created deep fault lines with Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Tunisia, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the UAE and Yemen," one senior Turkish industry source said. "That makes a total of 11 countries, otherwise potentially a huge market for Turkey.” 

 

But an Arab diplomat in Ankara thinks that some rapprochement, particularly with Saudi Arabia, which recently has softened its stance against the Muslim Brotherhood, may improve Turkish-Saudi ties.

 

“Better ties with the Kingdom and other Gulf states would require Turkey to recalibrate its policies,” he said.

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16 septembre 2015 3 16 /09 /septembre /2015 07:30
Cirit guided rocked system, here mounted on KMC remote weapon system (photo Victor M.S. Barreira)

Cirit guided rocked system, here mounted on KMC remote weapon system (photo Victor M.S. Barreira)

 

09/14/2015 Victor M. S. Barreira - defenceiq.com

 

Turkish state-owned missile and rocket house Roketsan signed two memorandums of understanding (MoUs) with Polish companies Zak?ady Metalowe Mesko and Wojskowe Zak?ady Lotnicze Nr 1 (WZL 1) covering future cooperation on a range of defence industry activities. Both Polish companies are owned by the local armaments group Polska Grupa Zbrojeniowa (PGZ).

 

The scope of the signed MoU with ZM Mesko is to formalise the intent of collaboration on products and programmes involving capabilities and solutions including Cirit 70mm laser guided rocket and UMTAS (Uzun Menzilli Tanksavar Sistemi) long range air-to-surface anti-tank missile developed by Roketsan, air defence missile, guidance kits for conventional ammunition and other precision guided weapon systems.

The agreement with WZL 1 is to formalise the intent of collaboration on products and programmes involving the integration of Cirit and UMTAS weapon systems and other equipment on various types of platforms in the Polish Army inventory.

Both can be fired from helicopters, unmanned aircraft systems, armoured vehicles, light attack aircraft, surface vessels and stationary platforms. The T129 ATAK helicopter is being offered to Poland’s Kruk programme.

 

 

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25 mai 2014 7 25 /05 /mai /2014 17:50
Selcuk Yasar (left) and Thomas Homberg (right) signing the MoU on 70 mm guided rockets.

Selcuk Yasar (left) and Thomas Homberg (right) signing the MoU on 70 mm guided rockets.


23/05/2014 MBDA

 

MBDA Deutschland GmbH and Roketsan have signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a collaboration in manufacturing and integration of a 70mm guided weapon system.

 

Under the terms of the agreement signed at the ILA Berlin Air Show the two companies will initiate the exchange of business and technical information for a guided weapon system based on the 70mm rocket concept for the German UH Tiger. Both companies aim to provide a solution for an expected German Army requirement for this helicopter.

The MoU was signed by MBDA Deutschland GmbH Managing Director, Thomas Homberg and Roketsan CEO & President, Selcuk Yasar.

Thomas Homberg said: "The already existing cooperations between Roketsan and MBDA will be extended by this focused initiative. We are combining our competencies to jointly providing this required capability to the German Armed Forces."

Selcuk Yasar said: “We believe that with this cooperation we will be able to offer an enhanced weapon system to the German customer by bringing together the capabilities of Cirit, 2,75” Laser Guided Missile and MBDA Deutschland GmbH’s proven expertise on the platforms’ weapon management systems. We hope the result of this initiative will lead to a broader business cooperation between the two companies in the future.”

 

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7 avril 2014 1 07 /04 /avril /2014 07:30
Air Weapons: Turkish Hellfire

 

April 6, 2014:  Strategy Page

 

Turkey recently conducted a successful test of its Hellfire clone, the Mizrak-U. With a range of 8 kilometers the Turkish missile can use either an infrared imaging guidance system or laser homing. Turkey becomes one of a growing list of nations that have produced their own version of the Hellfire. Britain produces a Hellfire variant, called Brimstone which is unique mainly in that it can be fire from jets. This version has become very popular as well. Several other countries, like China, have produced missiles similar in weight, size and capabilities to the Hellfire. Now Turkey is doing so as well.

 

The American AGM-114 Hellfire missile entered service since 1984 and proved enormously useful in the war on terror. An improved Hellfire II appeared in 1994 and over 30,000 have been produced so far. The Hellfire II weighs 48.2 kg (106 pounds), carries a 9 kg (20 pound) warhead and has a range of 8,000 meters. These have been the most frequently used American missiles for over a decade, with over 16,000 fired in training or (mostly) combat since 2001. A growing number of these Hellfires are for foreign customers. Hellfire missiles cost about $100,000 each depending on warhead and guidance system options.

 

Hellfire was originally designed for use by helicopter gunships against masses of Cold War era Russian tanks. That never happened, except in Kuwait during the 1991 war against Russian tanks owned by Iraq. Hellfire was quite successful in Kuwait. With the end of the Cold War the Hellfire seemed destined for the history books, as just another missile that worked but never distinguished itself. This all changed in 2002 when the CIA first used a Hellfire fired from a Predator UAV to kill a hard-to-find terrorist. The U.S. Air Force wasn’t really interested in this sort of thing and the CIA used its own money and authority to buy Predator UAVs and arm them with Hellfires. It quickly became apparent that the air force was wrong about UAVs and, well, the Hellfire was an army weapon used on helicopters and the air force never considered such a combination of UAV and missile useful for anything. The army soon found that Hellfire was an excellent weapon for supporting troops in urban areas or when going after terrorists anywhere.

 

Turkey plans to use Mizrak-U on its new T129 helicopter gunship. This aircraft is based on the Italian A129 which is roughly comparable to the upgraded versions of the U.S. AH-1 (especially the AH-1W SuperCobra). The 4.6 ton A-129 was the first helicopter gunship designed and built in Western Europe and was introduced in the 1980s. While it has been upgraded frequently, the only customer so far has been Italy, which bought 60 of them. The manufacturer, Agusta/Westland, has been desperate to get an export customer and made a deal for Turkey to produce over a hundred T129s under license.

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12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 19:30
Turkish MIZRAK-U Anti-Tank Missile Launched

 

 

12/03/2014 by Paul Fiddian - Armed Forces International's Lead Reporter

 

State-owned Turkish weapons manufacturer Roketsan has tested a new air-launched anti-tank missile design, with successful results.

 

The MIZRAK-U test launch involved a Cobra AH-1S attack helicopter and took place over a 3.5 kilometre range. The missile successfully engaged with its designated target, paving the way for further trials and eventual entry-into-service, all being well.

 

Once in service, the MIZRAK-U missile will equip the Turkish Land Forces' TAI/AgustaWestland T129 attack helicopters, examples of which are currently being delivered.

 

The TAI/AgustaWestland T129 is based on the Agusta A129 Mangusta helicopter, which first flew in the mid-1980s. Harnessing the preceding design's airframe, it features advanced avionics and weapons systems developed in Turkey, plus more powerful engines and rotor blades. Six examples have been built, with 54 more set to ultimately join the Turkish Land Forces.

 

MIZRAK-U Missile

 

The MIZRAK-U missile is designed to strike targets with up to eight kilometres separation. It will be put into full-scale production from 2015 onwards and boasts an infrared seeker, a high-explosive warhead and other features.

 

Also now in development is a medium-range variant, named MIZRAK-O. This has a range of four kilometres but, otherwise, shares many characteristics.

 

The Turkish Land Forces has existed in its modern form since July 1949. In recent years, it has employed around 400,000 personnel and participated in numerous conflicts and, for more than two decades, has been continually introducing new military technologies into service.

 

Turkish Anti-Tank Missile

 

Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk utility helicopters serve with the Turkish Ground Forces in greater numbers than any other rotary platform but it also operates 37 AH-1 SuperCobra and 30 AH-1 Cobra attack helicopters, of the type used in the Turkish anti-tank missile test.

 

Roketsan was established in 1988 and produces rockets, missiles, mortars and other weapons. It is also involved in a programme through which Turkey's satellite launch capability will expand. The nation's Space Launch System project will involve the construction of a spaceport, satellite launch vehicles and other satellite operations infrastructure.

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13 juin 2013 4 13 /06 /juin /2013 07:50
FN Herstal Qualified on Numerous Multi-Role Helicopters and Subsonic Aircraft

Jun 12, 2013 ASDNews Source : FN Herstal

 

Taking advantage of its century-long expertise in the design, development and manufacture of combat-proven machine guns, FN Herstal started to integrate 7.62x51mm NATO and .50 cal machine guns onto various platforms several decades ago. This has resulted in numerous rotary-wing and subsonic fixed-wing aircraft being qualified with FN integrated airborne weapon systems to total more than 3,000 units in service around the globe today.

 

FN airborne podded systems are fitted with a .50 cal FN M3P™ machine gun and are operated by the pilot using an armament management system. Various configurations are on sale – featuring a 250- or 400-round ammunition box and a Links (LC) or Links and Cases Collector (LCC). For the first time in its booth at the Paris Air Show in Le Bourget from 17 to 23 June 2013, FN Herstal will display a pod variant called FN RMP™/Cirit combining a .50 cal FN M3P™ machine gun and a three tube 2.75” laser guided missile launcher from the Turkish company Roketsan.

 

FN airborne pod weapon systems will be displayed with OEMs also to include: Aerotec Group, Beechcraft, Eurocopter, and Iomax.

 

FN airborne pintle mounted systems – equipped with either a 7.62x51mm FN MAG® 58M or .50 cal FN M3M™ machine gun – are designed to be window-, door- or ramppositioned. FN Herstal and the helicopter companies AgustaWestland and Eurocopter will display FN pintle weapon systems in Paris.

 

In addition to airborne solutions, FN Herstal also offers integrated weapon systems for land and sea applications, including the deFNder® family of remote weapon stations fitted with FN machine guns ranging from 5.56x45mm NATO up to .50 cal.

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27 mai 2013 1 27 /05 /mai /2013 16:30
MAZ 543 with Grad missiles

MAZ 543 with Grad missiles

BAKOU, 27 mai - RIA Novosti

 

L'Azerbaïdjan lancera prochainement la production de missiles conjointement avec la compagnie turque Roketsan, annonce lundi l'agence APA, se référant à un communiqué publié par Roketsan.

 

"Dans le cadre de l'accord signé le 8 mai à Istanbul, l'Azerbaïdjan produira des missiles de 107 et 122 millimètres. Roketsan n'étant chargée que de livrer les propulseurs des missiles, tous leurs composants ainsi que leur assemblage seront réalisés par la partie azerbaïdjanaise", indique le communiqué.

 

La portée des missiles de 122 millimètres sera de 42 kilomètres (deux fois supérieure à celle des missiles russes Grad), alors que la portée de missiles de 107 millimètres sera de 11 kilomètres, soit quatre kilomètres de plus que les missiles analogues fabriqués par la Russie et l'Ukraine.

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24 avril 2013 3 24 /04 /avril /2013 07:30
Umtas Long Range Antitank Missile

Umtas Long Range Antitank Missile

Apr. 22, 2013 - By BURAK EGE BEKDIL – Defense news

 

Development of 'National Systems' Moves at Full Speed

 

ANKARA — Hardly a day passes without a Turkish defense company proudly announcing that it has designed, developed and produced a weapon system the country would normally buy off-the-shelf from a foreign supplier. The most recent indigenously developed Turkish weapon is an anti-tank missile, the UMTAS.

 

Turkish military officials are anxiously awaiting the first serial production and delivery of the UMTAS.

 

“After years of going from one foreign supplier to another, we are happy to have our companies providing us with national solutions,” a senior Army official said.

 

Procurement officials said the UMTAS has recently undergone several successful field tests.

 

“This system can quickly find foreign buyers and mark an impressive transformation [of Turkey] from an import-dependent country into an exporting one,” one procurement official said. “It is relatively low-cost and reliable.”

 

State-owned missile maker Roketsan initiated the long-range anti-tank UMTAS missile project in efforts, first, to meet local demand from the Turkish Armed Forces, and later to export it, especially to countries in the region.

 

The UMTAS, with its infrared imaging and laser-seeker options, is an anti-tank missile with a range of 8 kilometers to be used in air-to-ground and ground-to-ground operations.

 

Roketsan officials said the system is going through further tests for technical properties and compatibility with environmental conditions. Thus far, the system has completed ballistic-missile tests and controlled-missile tests, and its sub-system design has been finished, they said.

 

The UMTAS is considered the official anti-tank system for the T-129, the helicopter gunship Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) is co-producing with Italian-British AgustaWestland in a US $3.2 billion project. It also can be integrated into the Anka, Turkey’s first locally developed unmanned aircraft. Other potential platforms to be outfitted with the UMTAS are armored land vehicles and naval vessels.

 

Roketsan officials said they plan to develop the L-UMTAS, the same anti-tank missile with laser seeker warheads and missiles using high-explosive particles.

 

In February, Roketsan said it won a contract from the United Arab Emirates to sell its laser-guided rocket system, known as the Cirit, under a contract worth $196.2 million. The deal comes as Turkey seeks to boost arms exports to Arabian Gulf countries. The Emirati Army is the first foreign customer for the Cirit system.

 

The Cirit is one of several programs launched by Turkey to equip the Army’s T-129, AH-1P Cobra and AH-1W Super Cobra attack helicopters with low-cost precision strike capabilities. The 70 mm rocket has a range of 8 kilometers.

 

French-German company Eurocopter selected the Cirit for a test and integration program to equip the Eurocopter EC635. Roketsan is also producing canisters for Lockheed Martin’s Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missile.

 

Analysts say the commercial development of the Anka boosted Turkish defense manufacturing.

 

“The Anka is the first aerial platform totally designed, developed and manufactured by Turkish engineering. It has a symbolic importance,” said Ceyhun Ozguven, an Ankara-based analyst.

 

The Anka has a 56-foot wingspan, a top speed of 75 knots and a maximum altitude of 30,000 feet. It completed military testing in late January and is set for serial production. Turkey aims to export the drone around the region, with the Egyptian government reportedly considering an order.

 

With the Anka headed for serial production, TAI has already begun developing an armed version of the drone called the Anka +A that will be outfitted with Cirit missiles .

 

On March 6, Turkey’s President Abdullah Gul showed the Anka to Jordan’s King Abdullah, along with other military products, such as the T-129 and the Hurkus, a basic trainer aircraft TAI is developing. In 2012, Turkey exported about $1.2 billion worth of defense equipment, a 35.7 percent rise over 2011. The main export destinations were the US, UAE and Saudi Arabia. The industry is aiming for $2 billion in exports by 2016.

 

Turkey’s procurement office, the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM), has a regional office in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, for overseeing and coordinating export activities in the region.

 

Other Turkish weapons include the Altay tank, a $400 million project developed and produced by privately owned armored vehicles maker Otokar. South Korea’s Hyundai Rotem and Turkey’s Roketsan and Aselsan, a state-owned military communications and electronics company, are among the project’s sub-contractors. Also, last month Aselsan said it successfully developed the country’s first indigenous identification friend or foe (IFF) system and delivered the first prototypes to the Turkish military

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16 juillet 2011 6 16 /07 /juillet /2011 05:50

http://www.defencetalk.com/pictures/data/4833/IM000695.JPG

photo defencetalk.com

 

Jul 13 2011 trdefence.com

 

Roketsan is completing development of a trio of guided anti-armour weapons

 

Turkish Land Forces Command is the main customer, but the missiles will be marketed for exports

 

Since the mid-1990s Turkey’s Roketsan has firmly established itself in the design, development and production of unguided surface-to-surface rockets. During the past decade, however, the company has ventured into the more complex and demanding guided-weapons business with the development of three anti-armour systems.

 

All three are being manufactured under contract to the Turkish Land Forces Command (TLFC) with Roketsan as the prime contractor, and will also be offered on the export market. Several other Turkish companies are involved in the programmes, including Aselsan.

 

Cirit

 

In 2004 Roketsan began development of a 2.75-inch semi-active laser-guided missile (SALGM) called Cirit, which was originally the name of a Turkish cavalry-rooted sport played for many centuries. It was also sometimes called Jereed, meaning ‘Javelin’ – also the name of the Raytheon-Lockheed Martin man-portable fire-and-forget anti-tank guided weapon [ATGW] system. Cirit was intended to provide the TLFC’s AH-1P Cobra and AH-1W Super Cobra attack helicopters with a precision attack capability.

 

Rather than upgrading its existing 2.75-inch unguided rocket, Roketsan elected to develop a new missile that could be launched from MIL-STD-810 F- and MIL-STD-464 A-compatible M- and LAU-series launchers, which are widely deployed.

 

Cirit has an overall length of 1.9 m and a launch weight of 15 kg. Minimum range is 1,500 m and maximum range is 8,000 m.

 

The SALGM has a conventional layout, with a passive SAL seeker installed in the nose, surmounting the control unit with four swing-out control surfaces, which is in turn followed by the guidance section and power source.

 

Further back is the multipurpose warhead, which provides a combined anti-armour, anti-personnel and incendiary effect. According to Roketsan, this is optimised to neutralise high-value soft or semi-hardened targets.

 

The rear of the SALGM contains the rocket motor, which is insensitive munition (IM)-compliant and has a reduced smoke signature. It is connected to the rear section by a roll bearing that enables it to rotate in flight.

 

There are four small stabilising surfaces at the very rear of the missile immediately in front of the exhaust nozzle.

 

During deployment, the gunner designates the target prior to launch, after which the rocket relies on a MEMS (micro electromechanical system)-type inertial measurement unit in combination with terminal laser homing.

 

According to Roketsan, Cirit has a high probability of hit on a 3×3 m target at maximum range.

 

First tests of Cirit were carried out in 2006, with development and flight qualification completed in 2008. Low-rate initial production has already commenced and will ramp up to full-rate production in 2012.

 

The company says that nearly 100 Cirit missiles of different configurations were launched during the extensive development and qualification tests. These included ballistic, control and guidance test missiles, plus qualification missiles.

 

As the SALGM is longer than the M- and LAU-series pods, Roketsan has developed a new launch pod and a new canister in which Cirit is delivered as an all-up round. The latter is loaded into either a two- or a four-round launch pod, which is more robust against environmental conditions than a standard launcher and easier to load and unload.

 

Cirit can additionally be fired from a ‘smart’ launcher, which has a MIL-STD-1760 interface. This can hold two or four SALGMs and contains all of the control electronics, enabling it to be rapidly integrated onto a number of helicopters that are required only to have a MIL-STD-1760 interface.

 

Roketsan signed an agreement with Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) in May 2011 for the integration of its Cirit Smart Launcher System on the T-129 attack helicopter, to enable data transfer between the missile and the helicopter launch platform.

 

Also in May, Roketsan signed a memorandum of understanding with Eurocopter for integration of Cirit on the EC635 helicopter, tests of which are planned for an unknown date.

 

UMTAS

 

Development of the UMTAS (Uzun Menzilli Tanksavar Fuze Sistemi) long-range air-launched ATGW began in 2005 with the Turkish Undersecretary of National Defence’s award to Roketsan of an initial TRY50 million (USD30.53 million), 26-month Phase I study contract. Phase I covered concept work, including subsystems such as missile propulsion, guidance and warhead.

 

The ATGW will be the main armament of TAI’s T-129 attack helicopter, which is a further development of the AgustaWestland A129 Mangusta. It is expected that 51 T-129s will be built to supplement the currently deployed AH-1P and AH-1W attack helicopters used by the TLFC.

 

The UMTAS missile is 1.8 m long and 16 cm in diameter. Launch weight is 37.5 kg and range is 500-8,000 m.

 

Roketsan received the Phase II contract in mid-2008. First helicopter trial launches have taken place from an AH-1P, which is being used as a testbed for the programme. Safe separation and jettison tests have also been carried out.

 

The launcher has a military-standard interface and weighs 60 kg. The T-129 attack helicopter would typically carry two launchers, each with four UMTAS missiles, and two launch pods with two or four Cirit 2.75-inch missiles each.

 

Aselsan has developed a pedestal-type launcher with four UMTAS missiles in the ready-to-launch position. This could be installed on fast attack craft or patrol boats.

 

In addition to lock-on-before-launch and lock-on-after-launch operational modes, UMTAS can be used against masked targets. The firing envelope enables an off-boresight target engagement.

 

UMTAS has completed ballistic and control test firings and is undergoing guided firing tests.

 

Although the first application of UMTAS will be airborne, it is also suitable for some land- and sea-based platforms.

 

OMTAS

 

A new weapon known as OMTAS (Orta Menzilli Tanksavar Sistemi) portable medium-range ATGW has grown out of UMTAS and shares several of its subsystems. These include: a nose-mounted uncooled imaging infrared (IIR) seeker developed by Aselsan; a tandem HEAT warhead optimised against targets fitted with explosive reactive armour (ERA) – the first warhead neutralises the ERA, thereby clearing a path for the larger main charge; a duplex RF datalink for uplink-downlink between the user and missile command; and other electronic subsystems.

 

Roketsan received an initial Phase I design contract for the OMTAS ATGW in April 2007, which it fulfilled by the end of 2009.

 

The system consists of a missile in its launch tube and a tripod with associated control unit and sighting unit (SU), the latter two systems together weighing about 55 kg.

 

The OMTAS missile has an overall length of 1.68 m and the same 16 cm diameter as UMTAS, but is slightly lighter at 35 kg, including launch tube. It has four flip-out control surfaces at the very rear and six flip-out wings about two thirds of the way down from the nose.

 

It has a minimum range of 200 m and maximum range of more than 4,000 m. Its solid-propellant HTPB (hydroxy terminate polybutadiene) rocket motor – also developed by Roketsan – is IM-compliant.

 

The SU features a thermal camera, TV camera, digital magnetic compass and laser rangefinder. It can be removed and used as a standalone observation device, providing an all-weather target battlefield surveillance capability.

 

OMTAS can be launched from within a confined space. It has fire-and-forget and fire-and-update modes of operation, as well as direct-attack and top-attack options for masked targets.

 

Although the first version of OMTAS will be tripod mounted, the ATGW can also be integrated onto tracked and wheeled platforms. During transportation and field deployment each end of the launch tube is fitted with a protective cover.

 

According to Roketsan, first missiles have already been successfully test fired without the IIR seeker and all-up firings are due in 2012, with design freeze scheduled for late 2012.

 

Ballistic performance trials have also been completed, as well as control and guidance characteristics using control test vehicles.

 

Full-scale development (Phase II) is still in progress in line with the original schedule, with qualification expected to take place in 2013 and production (Phase III) to commence in 2014.

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