Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
10 juin 2015 3 10 /06 /juin /2015 16:40
RAF Typhoon of 6 Squadron from 121 Expeditionary Air Wing deployed in Estonia intercepts Russian Il-20 Coot A electronic surveillance aircraft - photo RAF.jpg

RAF Typhoon of 6 Squadron from 121 Expeditionary Air Wing deployed in Estonia intercepts Russian Il-20 Coot A electronic surveillance aircraft - photo RAF.jpg


10 June 2015 by Royal Air Force
 

RAF Typhoons made a “two-in-one” interception, launching to find and identify Russian aircraft in two different places over the Baltic Sea as part of the NATO Baltic Air Policing mission for Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.

 

A pair of Typhoons were scrambled this morning from Ämari Air base in Estonia to intercept an unknown aircraft tracking the Baltic airspace without having filed a flight plan. Having identified it as an Il-20M Coot A surveillance aircraft, they were then re-tasked whilst still airborne to check out another aircraft. It was seen to be an An-26 Curl transport aircraft going north from Kaliningrad.

These two intercepts resulted from close teamwork between the Estonian Air Force and the RAF Air Surveillance and Control System (ASACS) detachment at Ämari. ASACS detachment commander, Flight Lieutenant Paul “Griff” Griffin explained: “The Estonian controllers will have seen it on their radar picture. They evaluate speed, heading, height and whether it has a flight plan. They give it an appropriate ID coloured according to their assessment of its intent. We saw this one show up in a sea of green.”

He continued: “My job as the 121 EAW representative is to provide input to NATO’s Combined Air Operations Centre at Uedem in Germany. It’s almost like a bidding process. Every unit identifies what they can do. In this case the Typhoons were given a ‘Yes’ and one of the Estonians hit the ‘Scramble’ button. As our aircraft get in the air, it’s my job to vector them on. Steering them left, right, faster, slower to get them behind the unknown aircraft.”

Sgt Chris Ashcroft, in the ASACS detachment takes-up the story: “My part is to generate the air picture – so it can be seen in the cockpit to increase the situational awareness of the Typhoon pilots. It takes a bit of training to ensure they have the right footprint visible”.

Interception of two aircraft on the same sortie demonstrates the flexible capability of the RAF Typhoons in policing Baltic airspace and making it safer for civilian air traffic. Detachment Commander, Wing Commander Stu Smiley said: “As we enter our second month of policing the Baltic airspace, this is the fourth intercept tasking we have had. It’s much as expected. Today’s double intercept easily demonstrates the capability we bring to the mission”.

Flt Lt Griffin simply summed it up: “ It’s a bit like waiting for a bus. You wait so long and then two turn up at once. But we are trained to do that.”

An-26 Curl transport aircraft - photo RAF.jpg

An-26 Curl transport aircraft - photo RAF.jpg

Partager cet article
Repost0
4 juin 2015 4 04 /06 /juin /2015 12:50
Typhoon in mutil-role fit with Brimstone missile and Paveway IV

Typhoon in mutil-role fit with Brimstone missile and Paveway IV

 

May 29, 2015 by Think Defence

 

Getting ready for Tornado out of service and continued evolution of the aircraft with Brimstone, Storm Shadow, Paveway IV, Meteor and E-Scan radar, the Typhoon continues to grow, at a glacial pace perhaps but slow and steady is not always a bad thing.

 

The MoD has let a £1.7m contract to BAE to research a common weapon launcher for Typhoon that can be used to carry multiple weapons on a single hardpoint, much like the existing Brimstone launcher but also to include other weapons, principally, Meteor Paveway IV and a future SPEAR Cap 3.

 

In the delicate balancing act between Typhoon and F35B (and beyond) I have started to think for a while we need to get behind Typhoon and reconsider our Tranche 3 commitment.

Partager cet article
Repost0
3 juin 2015 3 03 /06 /juin /2015 16:30
RAF strike on ISIL vehicle in Iraq May 27


29 mai 2015 by Defence HQ

 

On Wednesday 27 May, Tornado GR4s from RAF Akrotiri flew in support of Kurdish peshmerga attacks on terrorists in northern Iraq. An armed pick-up truck was spotted, partly concealed under trees, and destroyed with a Brimstone missile.

Partager cet article
Repost0
3 juin 2015 3 03 /06 /juin /2015 16:30
photo Saudi Air Force

photo Saudi Air Force

 

May 31, 2015: Strategy Page

 

As Saudi Arabia carries out the longest air campaign (against Yemen) in its history it was noted that the Saudis were sending up to fifty British made Typhoon and Tornado fighter-bombers a day on combat missions. The Saudis have 80 Tornados and 48 Typhoons with another 72 Typhoons on order. In contrast Britain has 125 Typhoons and 98 Tornados. Because of budget cuts and the resulting shortages of spare parts and maintenance personnel Britain could not put as many Typhoons and Tornados into action as Saudi Arabia. This is another example of how just having a lot of combat aircraft can be misleading. If you cannot afford to keep them flying your air force becomes much less capable than it appears.

 

For Britain this is nothing new. Since the late 1990s Britain's RAF (Royal Air Force) has had to deal with year after year of budget cuts. By 2011 the years of cutting corners because of shrinking budgets reached the point where a lack of spare parts for the new Eurofighter Typhoon limited the amount of time pilots could spend in the air. This, in turn, led to only eight pilots being certified as qualified to perform ground attack duties in the Eurofighter. While the Eurofighter is mainly an air-superiority ("fighter") aircraft, there is very little call for that sort of thing at the moment. Ground attack, on the other hand, was very much in demand during 2011 when NATO agreed to provide support for Libyan rebels. Now the RAF now finds that the Saudi Air Force has more pilots capable of flying bombing missions than Britain and can put more combat aircraft into the air than the RAF.

 

The two decades of cuts had already led to cancellations of orders for new aircraft. In 2009 Germany and Britain both decided to cut back on the number of Typhoons they would buy. Thus the final 37 Typhoons Germany agreed to buy for its Luftwaffe (air force) were instead offered for export. Germany would have preferred to just cancel the final 37 aircraft but this would have resulted in over a billion dollars in cancellation fees. But the export option will hurt the Typhoons project as Germany will sell their 37 aircraft for whatever they can get, thus denying the Typhoons (Eurofighter) consortium export sales.

 

At the same time Britain decided to not take all of its third batch of 88 Typhoon fighters. This cost Britain $2 billion in increased maintenance costs and penalties. Britain did take 40 of the fighters from the third batch and resold another 24 to Saudi Arabia. In effect, Britain was pulling out of the Eurofighter program, and cancelling 16 of the aircraft it was to have received from the third batch. The British government believed that 184 Typhoons would be sufficient and that it could not afford any more than that. That was optimistic and Britain ended up with 125 mew Typhoons and 80 older Tornados that will be retired by the end of the decade. The new American F-35 is supposed to replace the Tornados and some of the older Typhoons. Britain wanted buy 138 F-35s but it looks like 80 is a more realistic, or optimistic number.

 

Originally, Britain planned to buy 232 Typhoons. Germany was to get 180, Italy 121, and Spain 87. Most of those orders shrank in the 1990s. There are currently 430 Typhoon in service, after entering service in 2003. There are over a hundred still on order but total production will probably not be much more than 600.

 

Development of the Eurofighter began in the 1980s, and the first flight took place in 1994. Each aircraft costs over $170 million, including development costs. The Typhoon is a somewhat stealthy multi-role fighter. It is fast, maneuverable, and carries a lot of weapons. It also can be used for ground attack missions. This 23 ton aircraft will be the principal fighter in the air forces of Britain, Spain, Germany, and Italy. The Typhoon is closer in capability to the F-15, than the F-22, and is competing with the F-35 for many export sales. The Typhoon was purchased by Saudi Arabia mainly to provide protection from Iran.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2015 3 27 /05 /mai /2015 17:30
RAF Strike on ISIL 19 May

 

26 mai 2015 by Defence HQ

 

A Reaper identified a series of fortified positions; it successfully attacked one bunker with a Hellfire missile, then helped direct three attacks by the Tornado GR4s, which used Paveway IV precision guided bombs to destroy an artillery position and two other bunkers.

Partager cet article
Repost0
27 mai 2015 3 27 /05 /mai /2015 17:30
 RAF Strike on ISIL 21 May


26 mai 2015 by Defence HQ

 

RAF Tornados attack an ISIL weapons store in a tunnel and in the course of this strike, a camouflaged position nearby was spotted by the aircrew, confirmed as hostile, and was also bombed.

Partager cet article
Repost0
20 mai 2015 3 20 /05 /mai /2015 16:50
Commemorative “Battle of Britain” Painted RAF Typhoon Jet


20 mai 2015 by Royal Air Force

 

2015 is the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. To commemorate this and acknowledge the immense sacrifice and bravery of all who fought in the battle the RAF has painted a Typhoon fast jet in a Battle of Britain colour scheme. The aircraft is also painted with the 249 Squadron identification number of the only Fighter Command pilot to be awarded a Victoria Cross medal during the battle: Flight Lieutenant James Brindley Nicolson VC DFC. http://www.RAF.mod.uk

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mai 2015 2 19 /05 /mai /2015 20:30
RAF Strike on ISIL 17 May

 

19 mai 2015 by Defence HQ

 

RAF Tornado GR4s supported Iraqi army operations in the Bayji area, and safely destroyed with a Brimstone missile a car-bomb which the terrorists had positioned ahead of the advancing Iraqi troops.

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mai 2015 2 19 /05 /mai /2015 12:50
Defence Secretary Michael Fallon: My key defence priorities

Rt Hon Michael Fallon MP Secretary of State for Defence visited Army HQ in Andover  to speak to senior officers on his plans for Defence over the next five years of Conservative Government. He was met by General Sir Nick Carter, Chief of General Staff. The Secretary of State emphasised the need for the Army to remain 'ready' to deter against threats and protect the UK and our NATO allies.

 

MOD News Team, 18 May 2015 — Ministerial comment

 

It was a great honour to be asked by the Prime Minister to accept again the role of Defence Secretary. Continuity is important, but make no mistake: this is a new Government, elected with a clear mandate to implement the Conservative manifesto.

 

When the Prime Minister re-appointed me, he stressed just how important he believes our role is in Defence. We are here to deliver.

 

The incredible VE Day 70 celebrations recalled the triumph of the forces of freedom over the forces of fascism. We need no reminding that the world today remains an equally dangerous place. In the Middle East, ISIL barbarians perpetrate atrocity after atrocity while, on the fringes of Europe, an aggressive Russia agitates against the Ukraine and threatens NATO. Meanwhile, other disasters both natural and man-made continue to demand our response.

 

In just the last few weeks, our roster of activity has included:

    targeting terrorists in Iraq

    policing Baltic skies

    supplying equipment to Ukrainian forces

    taking part in the largest ever NATO anti-submarine exercise off Estonia

    assisting in the relief effort in Nepal

    and sending HMS Bulwark and three of our Merlin helicopters to the Mediterranean to alleviate the migrant crisis

 

It is critical for us to remain ready respond to concurrent crises on multiple fronts in the future. That’s why I have identified three key priorities in the coming months.

 

First, to take a leading role in the Strategic Defence and Security Review. This will enable us to establish where, when and from whom future threats may come.

 

Second, to make sure we have the right capabilities to do the job. That means getting the right mix of manpower in our Armed Forces - whether Regulars, Reserves or civilians. That means making the most of our £163bn Equipment Plan to give our Armed Forces the high-end capability they need. And it means ensuring we maintain our Continuous-At-Sea Deterrence by building the next generation of Successor submarines.

 

Lastly, my third priority is to strengthen our international partnerships. Global problems require global solutions. We need to do everything we can to work bi-laterally with our partners such as the US and France – and I will be speaking to my counterparts in those countries this week. We also need to work multilaterally, with NATO – the cornerstone of our Defence, and with our other European partners.

 

Ultimately, success in all these areas depends on the quality of our people both military and civilian. That is why I am going out and about to meet our staff up and down the country.  I’ve already spoken already to Defence colleagues in London, Andover and High Wycombe.

 

That is why we will be building on the success of our Armed Forces Covenant, ensuring Armed Forces personnel, veterans and their families continue to get the resources they need. And that is why we will be acting decisively to ensure our Armed Forces overseas are not subject to persistent human rights claims that undermine their ability to do their job.

 

So there’s an enormous amount to be getting on with. But there's a mandate behind our momentum. And make no mistake, we will inject all our energy and enthusiasm into the task. Doing everything in our power to guarantee the safety, the security and the prosperity of citizens across the United Kingdom.

Partager cet article
Repost0
30 avril 2015 4 30 /04 /avril /2015 14:50
photo Royal Air Force

photo Royal Air Force

 

30 avr. 2015 by Royal Air Force

 

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, has completed overseas training ahead of the 2015 season. The Squadron - which flies Hawk T1 fast-jets - is seen here in Greece performing some of the moves which will be watched by hundred of thousands of people across the UK and overseas this year. The team was awarded Public Display Authority on 30 April, which is the formal start of the the Red Arrows' season.

Partager cet article
Repost0
10 avril 2015 5 10 /04 /avril /2015 14:50
Le XV de l'air entonne fièrement la Marseillaise

Le XV de l'air entonne fièrement la Marseillaise

 

10/04/2015 Armée de l'air  

 

Mercredi 1er avril 2015, le XV de l’Air, sélection nationale de rugby de l’armée de l’air, a accueilli son homologue de la Royal Air Force pour un match haut en couleurs.

 

Après deux jours en préparation au centre national des sports de la défense de Fontainebleau, les deux équipes se sont retrouvées à Versailles sous un soleil printanier pour accueillir un public nombreux.

 

Thomas Lièvremont, ancien joueur international français, a donné le coup d’envoi de la rencontre. Les chocs furent rudes tout au long du match et le niveau de jeu très élevé. Après un duel de buteur, les deux équipes étaient à égalité 6 – 6 à cinq minutes de la fin. Les assauts répétés des avants britanniques ont finalement percé la défense du XV de l’Air, qui a encaissé deux essais en trois minutes.

 

Résultat : 20-6, une lourde défaite qui ne reflète pas la physionomie du match. Les deux équipes se sont d’ores et déjà donné rendez-vous l’année prochaine pour une revanche en Angleterre !

Rugby : XV de l’Air vs Royal Air Force
Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mars 2015 4 26 /03 /mars /2015 13:45
photo UK MoD

photo UK MoD

 

26 March 2015 Ministry of Defence

 

An RAF C-130 aircraft will today leave RAF Brize Norton, on a UN mission to deliver vital supplies to remote Malakal in South Sudan.

 

This is the first deployment of a UK C-130 to the UN in Africa as part of the UN’s Air Transport Fleet. The aircraft, which has been deployed with a small support team, will conduct several flights between Juba, the capital of South Sudan, and the remote northern town of Malakal, in support of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). This will enable the delivery of vital loads of food, water and building supplies to UN camps.

The C-130 is desperately needed both to help the UN’s transport infrastructure which is in great demand, and to provide critical supplies to a country in the grip of a humanitarian crisis. The civil war in South Sudan has given rise to 112,000 internally displaced civilians seeking shelter in UN camps, particularly Malakal.

Group Captain Polly Perkins, Head of Establishment for RAF Brize Norton said:

The station is proud to be providing this crucial UK contribution towards UN peacekeeping operations in South Sudan. This deployment demonstrates our capability and commitment to provide humanitarian and security assistance, where ever in the world we’re needed.

The operation is expected to last until mid-April, and will form a key part of the UK’s wider engagement with the UN, including the 14 staff officers currently on secondment in African missions, 4 of them in UNMISS, and the 264 British troops contributed to the UN peacekeeping mission in Cyprus.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mars 2015 4 26 /03 /mars /2015 13:35
A Royal Air Force Chinook helicopter operating over Afghanistan - photo RAF

A Royal Air Force Chinook helicopter operating over Afghanistan - photo RAF

 

26 March 2015 by Flt Lt Henderson – Royal Air Force

 

After thirteen years supporting operations in Afghanistan, the first of the three remaining Royal Air Force Chinooks left Kabul this morning to begin the journey home.

 

Since the end of combat operations in Afghanistan in October 2014, three RAF Chinooks were retained in the country to assist British troops in non-combat roles but they are now on their way home.

 

In the early hours of Wednesday 25th March, the first of the heavy lift support helicopter from RAF Odiham in Hampshire was loaded on to the C17, marking the end of the UK Chinook Force’s contribution to operations in Afghanistan.

 

Synonymous with operations in Afghanistan over the last thirteen years, the Chinook Force has flown over 41,000 hours, extracted 13,000 casualties and its crews have been awarded numerous gallantry awards, including twenty three distinguished flying crosses for bravery in the air.

 

Group Captain Richard Maddison, RAF Odiham’s Station Commander, said, “The sight of a Chinook in Afghanistan will be iconic to many that have served there, or have witnessed the events from afar. The commitment of the personnel from the Chinook Force – whether in Afghanistan or supporting from the UK and other overseas locations – has been first rate.”

 

“We return with enormous pride at our contribution over this very testing period and wish those of the Puma Force the very best success as they continue to provide helicopter support in the country”.

 

Squadron Leader Paul Butler, Officer Commanding Operation TORAL Aviation Detachment said, “It is an honour and privilege to be the last Commanding Officer of the last Chinook detachment in Afghanistan.”

 

“I have been humbled by the dedication and steadfast work-ethic of the men and women working on the Chinook Force.”

 

“I am extremely proud of the contribution made by the Chinook Force during combat operations in this country, whether that be providing essential air mobility, moving coalition troops and equipment around theatre or undertaking lifesaving medical evacuation for injured troops.”

 

“Our role in Afghanistan has changed significantly since the end of Operation HERRICK, our mission on Operation TORAL, whilst different, is no less important. Providing aviation support to coalition troops working to ensure the institutional development of the Afghan government is a fitting end to our time in Afghanistan.”

 

A RAF Chinook helicopter is loaded into a C17 Globemaster for the long journey back to the UK from Afghanistan. - photo RAF

A RAF Chinook helicopter is loaded into a C17 Globemaster for the long journey back to the UK from Afghanistan. - photo RAF

The return of the Chinooks from Afghanistan also coincides with Defence Secretary Michael Fallon’s announcement to send two Chinooks to the Falkland Islands as part of measures designed to ensure defence resilience. He said:

 

"These measures will include the return of military support helicopters which were removed in 2006 to support operations in Afghanistan. On current plans this will involve the deployment of two Chinooks, which will be operational by the middle of next year.

 

"This is a significant capability which will provide reactive 24/7 tactical mobility in order to allow a swift and decisive response to any emerging incidents. The helicopters will also bring a heavy lift capability and will enhance the training opportunities available to the resident infantry company.”

 

The Chinook aviation detachment in Kabul will handover to the RAF Puma 2 Force from RAF Benson, on the 1st April 2015, the Puma 2 crews will remain in Afghanistan until the mission is complete.

A Royal Air Force Chinook helicopter operating over  Afghanistan

A Royal Air Force Chinook helicopter operating over Afghanistan

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mars 2015 4 26 /03 /mars /2015 13:30
MOD responds to Defence Committee report on ISIL action

 

25 March 2015 Ministry of Defence

 

The Government has responded to the Defence Select Committee’s report on the UK’s activity to tackle ISIL, rejecting the suggestion that the UK’s contribution has been “modest”.

 

The UK has been and remains at the forefront of the international diplomatic and military effort to support the Iraqi Government and moderate Syrian Opposition to defeat ISIL. The Committee’s conclusions are based on out of date or inaccurate information and do not recognise the major role the UK Government has played since the beginning of operations.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon Said:

The report recognises the UK is right to respond actively to the threat posed by ISIL but we reject the Committee’s conclusion that we are making a ‘strikingly modest’ contribution. We have played a major role in the military campaign from the start and have conducted 194 airstrikes in Iraq, second only to the US.

Throughout the campaign we have focused our military contribution where it can have the most impact – supporting Iraqi forces from the air, providing vital intelligence, surveillance and air-to-air refuelling capabilities. The RAF has contributed assets that few coalition partners can match and the US and other partners have acknowledged the impact these are having on the campaign.

The UK now has over 600 military personnel supporting operations, including over 140 in Iraq. We have trained over 1000 Iraqi ground forces and have gifted around 400 tonnes of equipment and ammunition. As a world leader in countering improvised explosive devices (C-IED) we are leading the coordination of the coalition’s C-IED training programme.

Clear strategy - In contrast with the Committee view that the UK lacks a clear strategy for the fight against ISIL the Government has been clear that the first priority is to minimise the threat to UK security and interests in the Middle East by pursuing three objectives. These include disrupting threats to the UK, working as part of an international coalition to defeat ISIL and to discredit its violent ideology and to mitigate the impact of ISIL and other violent extremist groups. The criticisms of the Service Chief’s “inability or unwillingness… to provide a clear, and articulate statement of the UK’s objectives” are unfounded and based around an outdated understanding of their role within Defence as responsibility for setting out a clear governance structure for military strategy does not lie with the Service Chiefs.

Number of airstrikes - The Committee also stated that the UK has only conducted 6% of air strikes – this is inaccurate. It is based on figures for Iraq and Syria and we only have parliamentary permission to conduct strikes over Iraq.

Number of military personnel - The Committee has also inaccurately compared the UK’s commitment with that of other countries, for example they stated that there were 400 Australian military personnel outside of Kurdish regions compared to only three UK military personnel. To date the Australians have deployed a similar number to the UK’s current deployment of around 140 military personnel.

Outside of Defence, the UK has contributed £39.5 million in humanitarian support to Iraq and the UK Government is supporting Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s steps towards political reconciliation and economic reform. Furthermore, the UK is taking action to counter ISIL’s finances and messaging and to restrict the flow of foreign fighters.

Partager cet article
Repost0
26 mars 2015 4 26 /03 /mars /2015 12:50
photo RAF - UK MoD

photo RAF - UK MoD

 

25 mars 2015 Aerobuzz.fr

 

Le 9 février 2014, un Airbus A330 « Voyager » de la Royal Air Force avait connu de brusques changements d’attitudes alors qu’il était en vol de croisière. L’appareil, qui rentrait d’Afghanistan avec 198 militaires à son bord, avait violemment piqué avant de retrouver une situation normale après une trentaine de secondes. 24 passagers et 7 membres d’équipage avaient été blessés pendant la manœuvre impromptue qui avait plaqué les passagers non attachés au plafond de la cabine. Le rapport publié hier par la Military Aviation Authority britannique confirme que l’incident a été provoqué par le commandant de bord qui avait déposé un appareil photo sur la console de gauche, entre l’accoudoir de son siège et le manche latéral. L’homme avait ensuite avancé son siège, bloquant l’appareil photo contre le manche lui même poussé en butée avant. L’avion avait alors perdu 4400 ft en 27 secondes, mais il était resté contrôlable et récupérable à l’issue de son piqué grâce à la protection automatique de l’enveloppe de vol souligne le rapport.

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mars 2015 4 19 /03 /mars /2015 17:35
photo UK MoD

photo UK MoD

 

19 March 2015 Department for International Development, The Rt Hon Justine Greening MP and Ministry of Defence

 

Britain is responding rapidly to help people affected by cyclone Pam.

 

A Royal Air Force C-17 plane carrying shelter and lighting from the UK has landed in Vanuatu, International Development Secretary Justine Greening announced today.

The plane arrived in Vanuatu at 0300 GMT on Thursday 19 March, carrying 1,640 shelter kits which can house families of five people and more than 1,900 solar lanterns with inbuilt mobile phone chargers.

These supplies will help protect some of the most vulnerable people affected by the cyclone, especially women and children.

Also on board were two humanitarian experts from the Department for International Development who are now based in country to ensure that emergency supplies reach people in the region and assess what further assistance Britain can provide.

Justine Greening said:

Britain’s rapid response to humanitarian disasters on the other side of the world is something to be incredibly proud of.

Cyclone Pam’s trail of destruction has left thousands of people without their home and access to power. Our emergency shelter kits and solar lanterns, which have arrived thanks to the swift and invaluable support of the Royal Air Force, will help meet people’s basic needs.

Britain stands ready to assist further to ensure supplies get to those in need and will continue to support the Government of Vanuatu as part of the wider Commonwealth effort.

Partager cet article
Repost0
19 mars 2015 4 19 /03 /mars /2015 08:50
photo Royal Air Force

photo Royal Air Force

 

March 19, 2015 By: Craig Hoyle - FG

 

London - Several of the Royal Air Force’s Lockheed Martin C-130J tactical transports have been upgraded for extended-range operations, the UK Ministry of Defence says.

Nine of the service’s Hercules have been equipped with external fuel tanks under a modification activity valued at around £7 million ($10.3 million), minister for defence equipment, support and technology Philip Dunne said earlier this month, responding to a parliamentary question.

 

Read more

Partager cet article
Repost0
18 mars 2015 3 18 /03 /mars /2015 13:35
A UK Royal Air Force's Puma HC Mk2 helicopter in flight. Photo RAF

A UK Royal Air Force's Puma HC Mk2 helicopter in flight. Photo RAF

 

18 March 2015 airforce-technology.com

 

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has deployed its newly upgraded Puma HC Mk2 helicopters to Afghanistan.

 

The first operational deployment of the helicopters comes more than three weeks after declaration of initial operating capability (IOC).

 

These helicopters will be flown by 33 and 230 Squadrons at RAF Benson in Oxfordshire, UK.

 

They are scheduled to relieve the Chinook force in Kabul, from providing aviation support to the UK and coalition troops who remain in Afghanistan in non-combat roles assisting the Afghan Government and the Afghan National Defence and Security Forces.

 

33 Squadron commanding officer wing commander Mark Biggadike said: "Our role will be to move troops and equipment around Kabul by air, which is more efficient than moving personnel who would otherwise be travelling by road.

 

"Puma 2 is ideal for operating in urban environments such as Kabul, it's small enough to land in fairly built up areas without creating too much downwash and disruption and it is relatively fast so we can move around the city quickly."

 

Approximateky 24 RAF Puma helicopters are being upgraded by Eurocopter under a £260m Puma life extension programme (LEP) contract awarded in September 2009, with an aim to extend their service life until 2025.

 

The Puma 2 upgrade includes the integration of two Turbomeca Makila engines, new gearboxes and tail rotors, and new engine controls, as well as a digital autopilot, a flight management system, an improved defensive aids suite, and ballistic protection for helicopter crew and passengers.

 

Biggadike said: "The upgrades to the aircraft mean it will fly further for longer, with greater loads in more extreme environments, such as the high attitudes and hot summers we will experience in Kabul."

 

The Puma Mk2 is air-transportable by C-17 Globemaster transport aircraft. It can carry up to 16 fully-equipped troops, and requires only four hours to be ready for deployment in support of both combat and humanitarian missions.

Partager cet article
Repost0
16 mars 2015 1 16 /03 /mars /2015 17:35
RAF carries UK aid to cyclone-hit Vanuatu


16 mars 2015 Defence HQ

 

The aircraft departed from RAF Brize Norton early on Monday 16 March and will travel to the Royal Australian Air Force base at Amberley in Australia, where it will join the international relief effort. The plane is carrying 1,640 shelter kits for use by families of five people and more than 1900 solar lanterns with inbuilt mobile phone chargers. These supplies will help to provide protection to some of the most vulnerable people affected by the cyclone.

Partager cet article
Repost0
13 mars 2015 5 13 /03 /mars /2015 08:50
photo FBC - Armée de l'Air

photo FBC - Armée de l'Air

 

12/03/2015 Armée de l'Air

 

À l’occasion de la 5econférence annuelle de Défense du Franco-British Council (FBC) organisée à Londres les 11 et 12 mars 2015, le général Denis Mercier, chef d’état-major de l’armée de l’air (CEMAA), et son homologue britannique, l’Air Chief Marshal Andrew Pulford, livrent leur vision respective de la coopération entre les deux forces aériennes. Mme Claire Chick, chef du pôle « Defence » au FBC, a recueilli leurs propos.

 

Claire Chick : Mon général, le partenariat franco-britannique entre les deux armées de l’air est une coopération qui fonctionne bien depuis longtemps. Qu’est-ce que les accords de Lancaster House lui ont apporté?

 

Général Denis Mercier : La coopération entre la Royal Air Force et l’armée de l’air française repose sur une base historique forte, qui a pris corps dès le début de l’aviation. Le deuxième conflit mondial a contribué à forger un fond de culture commune, où les pilotes français et britanniques ont appris à voler sur les avions de leurs partenaires de guerre. L’aviateur René Mouchotte est une figure emblématique de cette entente pragmatique au-dessus de la Manche. Aujourd’hui, l’excellente qualité de notre relation découle aussi en grande partie de notre expérience commune au sein de l’Otan. Nous opérons ensemble en permanence. L’Otan est un catalyseur d’interopérabilité que nous utilisons dans la relation franco-britannique, qui nous permet de développer les mêmes concepts de réactivité. Cette harmonisation des procédures et concepts d’emploi est une spécificité qui est propre aux aviateurs et qui constitue un socle fort de coopération. Reste que l’apport des accords de Lancaster House est clair : depuis bientôt cinq ans, nous allons plus loin sur l’échelle du rapprochement bilatéral, tant au niveau tactique qu’au niveau stratégique.

 

Quelle est par exemple la valeur ajoutée de la Combined Vision and Strategy (CVS) établie fin 2013? Permet-elle de progresser sur la voie d’une formulation stratégique commune?

La CVS est justement un produit concret des traités franco-britanniques de 2010. Les axes qui ont été retenus pour avancer sur la voie d’une influence commune ont ouvert cinq domaines de coopération: le C2, les capacités ISR, la projection stratégique, la force de combat et d’appui et enfin, l’éducation et l’entraînement. La mise en place du comité stratégique board to board est une initiative typiquement franco-britannique, que nous ne connaissons avec aucun autre partenaire, et qui nous permet de déterminer ensemble les objectifs de nos deux armées. Dans la pratique, c’est une démarche qui nous rapproche et nous permet de parler d’une seule voix dans les instances internationales. La European Air Chiefs Conference (EURAC) et la Nato Air Chiefs Conference (NACS) sont à cet égard des plateformes où nous avons l’occasion de formuler ensemble des propositions, et d’initier des projets en affirmant notre leadership.

 
photo EMA

photo EMA

 

Au plan opérationnel, quand pourra-ton parler d’une force de commandement Air franco-britannique pour intervenir dans la gestion des crises?

La Nato Response Force illustre notre volonté de partager et intégrer nos compétences. Quand l’armée de l’air est leader de la composante aérienne, elle reçoit un très fort soutien de la RAF et vice versa. Bien sûr, de nombreuses autres nations sont impliquées mais les capacités de commandement et contrôle françaises et britanniques constituent une force. Au niveau bilatéral, les exercices mis en place dans le cadre du calendrier soutenu de la CJEF sont très satisfaisants. Mais la prochaine étape doit être l’intégration. Nous devons nous projeter sur la constitution d’un détachement franco-britannique, et le partenariat renforcé par les accords de Lancaster House y contribue.

Dans le sillage de ce rapprochement de défense en évolution, le partage capacitaire entre l’armée de l’air et la RAF représente-t-il une ambition?

Une capacité c’est avant tout un groupe d’hommes qui utilise un équipement avec une doctrine d’emploi et une organisation spécifique. Le partage capacitaire intègre donc avant tout les hommes. Et avec les Britanniques, nous commençons à le faire. La mise en place d’un réseau d’officiers d’échange est un pas décisif dans cette direction, et par exemple, l’expérience de pilotes français et britanniques qui volent alternativement sur Eurofighter et Rafale contribue à confirmer la qualité du partenariat de défense. Plus l’intégration opérationnelle entre nos deux armées est forte et plus le partage capacitaire franco-britannique deviendra réalisable. C’est vrai pour les avions ravitailleurs et les transporteurs, c’est vrai aussi pour les drones. Sur le dossier FCAS, aujourd’hui, c’est l’industrie qui a la main pour préparer les choix technologiques de 2016. Mais les militaires doivent réfléchir de leur côté à un concept capacitaire commun. Le défi est de taille mais je suis optimiste, la volonté commune d’y arriver est réelle.

 
photo UK MoD

photo UK MoD

 

Le CEMAA et le CAS sont-ils des incitateurs à la mutualisation du soutien des matériels à l’échelle européenne?

Pour préserver la cohérence de nos équipements, nous estimons que la mise en oeuvre de normes européennes communes est un chantier prometteur. Avec L’EMAR (European Military Airworthiness Requirements), la France et le Royaume-Uni contribuent largement à l’effort d’harmonisation des règles de navigabilité militaire en Europe. Pour le soutien, il est vrai que l’externalisation pratiquée par les Britanniques sur les MRTT nous empêche d’envisager une coopération dans le domaine de la formation et de la maintenance. Le partenariat public-privé matérialisé par le mécanisme du PFI (Private Finance Initiative) n’existe pas en France à ce niveau. Mais sur d’autres dossiers, les initiatives franco britanniques sont des catalyseurs comme cela a été le cas pour le développement de l’European Air Group (EAG) né du groupe aérien Franco-Britannique. Enfin, le contrat franco-britannique de maintien en condition opérationnelle (MCO) des A400M marque le début d'une coopération inédite dans le soutien aéronautique. Le défi sera d’étendre, plus tard, cet effort de standardisation aux cinq autres pays partenaires.

 

Quelle(s) priorité(s) faut-il donner à l’entente bilatérale des aviateurs pour les cinq prochaines années?

Il faut placer le facteur humain au cœur de la relation franco-britannique de défense. Il faut que nos militaires se rencontrent pour que demain ils se déploient ensemble. Il faut que les aviateurs de tous niveaux se connaissent. Aujourd’hui, il existe des rencontres très fréquentes et de bonnes relations entre nos généraux et nos colonels. Il faut que nos jeunes officiers et sous-officiers se rencontrent plus souvent. Nous étions en Afrique récemment avec l’Air ChiefMarshal Pulford pour rendre visite aux aviateurs de la force Barkhane. Les rencontres au poste de commandement interarmées de N’Djamena et aux détachements de chasse et de drones ont permis d’afficher notre entente et d’être à l’écoute de nos unités. Il serait intéressant d’échanger sur nos pratiques en matière de ressources humaines. Et, par exemple, mettre en avant la question du barrage de la langue, même si en France la maîtrise de l’anglais devient un critère d’excellence dans le recrutement de nos militaires. Je suis sûr que bientôt, plus d’aviateurs de la RAF parleront aussi français!

 

Qu’est-ce qui vous divise ?

Le partage du renseignement reste une difficulté. La confiance mutuelle engrangée entre nous est conséquente. On ne peut bien sûr pas tout partager, mais on peut aller plus loin.

 

Retrouvez l’interview de l’Air Chief Marshal Andrew Pulford, Chief of the Air Staff, sur la Franco-British Defence cooperation

Partager cet article
Repost0
12 mars 2015 4 12 /03 /mars /2015 08:30
Air strikes in Iraq (Last updated: 11 March 2015)

 

11 March 2015 Ministry of Defence

 

British forces have continued to conduct air operations to assist the Iraqi government in its fight against ISIL.


 

Royal Air Force (RAF) aircraft have again struck a series of ISIL terrorist targets in Iraq.

 

RAF Tornado and Reaper aircraft have continued to fly missions over Iraq as part of the international coalition’s campaign to support the Iraqi government in their fight against ISIL. On Wednesday 4 March, a Reaper, which was providing air support to Iraqi army units, spotted the muzzle flash of a heavy calibre weapon. Close investigation allowed the Reaper’s crew to locate an ISIL towed artillery piece, which was then destroyed with a Hellfire missile. Investigation allowed the Reaper’s crew to locate an ISIL towed artillery piece which was destroyed with a Hellfire missile.

 

The following day, other Reapers continued to provide close air support to Iraqi ground forces in the west of the country. An ISIL vehicle was destroyed during Thursday morning, and then in the evening a series of Hellfire engagements took place. An ISIL vehicle check-point was neutralised, an attempt by terrorists to launch an attack on Iraqi troops was disrupted by three successful missile strikes, and finally an armed pick-up truck was destroyed late that night. The Reapers also provided surveillance support to two further air strikes by coalition fast jets.

 

On Sunday 8 March, a Reaper armed reconnaissance patrol provided surveillance for a coalition attack on an armed terrorist truck, then conducted an Hellfire attack on a second vehicle. Monday afternoon saw a pair of Tornado GR4s conduct close air support for Kudish peshmerga on the offensive south of Kirkuk. When the peshmerga came under fire from ISIL terrorists the GR4s were able to conduct successful strikes with Paveway IV guided bombs. In the early hours of Wednesday 11 March, a Tornado patrol located a camouflaged 130mm heavy artillery piece near Al Qaim in western Iraq, and destroyed it with Brimstone missiles.

 

An RAF Voyager air-to-air refuelling tanker continues to provide essential support both to our Tornados and other coalition aircraft, and RAF Sentry aircraft make a significant contribution to the coalition’s surveillance effort. In northern Iraq, the British military team has completed delivering a programme of infantry training for the Kurdish peshmerga, and is now refocusing on training assistance to help the Iraqi ground forces deal with the threat from improvised explosive devices, on which ISIL are increasingly reliant when they are forced to retreat.

Previous air strikes

 

1 March: A Reaper tracked an ISIL truck loaded with weapons and ammunition, and scored a direct Hellfire hit.

In the north of Iraq, meanwhile, British and coalition military instructors continue to provide infantry training for the peshmerga as they prepare for further offensives to extend the areas they have already liberated from terrorist control. HMS Dauntless and HMS Kent remain in the Gulf, supporting air strike operations by US and French aircraft carriers.

 

2 March: A pair of RAF Tornado GR4s led other coalition aircraft in an attack on a series of ISIL fortified positions south of Kirkuk. These bunkers posed a potential threat to offensive operations by the Kurdish peshmerga, who have also benefitted from equipment and extensive training provided by British and coalition military instructors.

 

Meanwhile, in western Iraq, RAF Reapers provided close air support to an Iraqi Army offensive in Anbar province. The retreating ISIL terrorists sought to hold up the Iraqi advance with numerous improvised explosive devices. One vehicle-borne bomb posed a particular obstacle to the Iraqi ground forces, so a Reaper destroyed the vehicle with a Hellfire missile. Later that night, another Reaper assisted Iraqi troops who had come under fire from the terrorists, carrying out an attack with a Hellfire missile on the ISIL position.

 

Military support is just one part of the UK government’s contribution to the global coalition strategy to defeat ISIL – we are also taking action to counter the terrorist network’s finances, are restricting the flow of foreign fighters and have provided vital humanitarian relief to help those affected by ISIL’s brutality. The RAF contribution includes Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, which, like the Tornados, provide reconnaissance and close air support to the Iraqi ground forces; a Voyager air-to-air refuelling tanker; a Sentry airborne surveillance and command aircraft; and air transport aircraft as necessary.

 

British military training teams continue to teach infantry and first aid skills to the Kurdish peshmerga, and liaison teams are embedded within Iraqi and coalition headquarters. Having previously provided military equipment to the Iraqi forces, Britain plans to gift improvised explosive device (IED) detectors to help the Iraqi and Kurdish soldiers protect themselves against the numerous improvised explosive devices on which ISIL are increasingly relying as they are forced back by successful offensives. In the Gulf, the Royal Navy’s Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless is operating in direct support of the US Navy’s aircraft carrier, USS Carl Vinson, which provides a significant part of the coalition’s air effort.

 

Details of previous airstrikes can be found here.

Partager cet article
Repost0
6 mars 2015 5 06 /03 /mars /2015 08:50
photo Cpl Goddard RAF

photo Cpl Goddard RAF


March 05, 2015 defense-aerospace.com

(Source: Royal Air Force; issued March 05, 2015)
 

The A400M Atlas, the Royal Air Force’s newest airlift aircraft, delivered a cargo of vital freight into Cyprus this week on its first operational mission as it prepares for initial operational capability later this year.

The aircraft, ‘City of Bristol’, flew into RAF Akrotiri delivering operational freight, making this training flight also Atlas’ first operational tasking. In the Captain’s seat on this historic flight was 24 Squadron pilot, Flight Lieutenant Jamie “JJ” Jackson. He said:

“This flight was incredibly significant for the RAF demonstrating the capability of the aircraft and that we are able to use it to support operations even before we are declared operational. Once we were airborne the aircraft performed well throughout all phases of flight and was great to fly.”

Destined to replace the C130 Hercules, the Atlas is a significantly larger aircraft that has been designed to project tactical air mobility capabilities at range, direct to the point of need. Wing Commander Simon Boyle, Officer Commanding 70 Squadron, said:

“This task illustrates how we are developing the use of the aircraft in this early period. We have been able to support defence operations whilst continuing to grow the experience of our Force’s aircrew instructors, before they begin to train the crews destined for 70 Squadron later this year.”

The aircraft’s load consisted of a variety of freight. Speaking at the Atlas’ UK base at RAF Brize Norton, Simon added:

“The delivery of operational freight is central to the mission of the Atlas Force. This is an important step towards the declaration of an initial strategic Air Transport capability on Atlas in RAF service, and bodes well for 70 Squadron becoming operational as the front-line Atlas squadron later this year.”

Also taking part in the aircraft’s first operational flight was 70 Squadron’s Senior Loadmaster, Master Aircrewman Ian Price. He said:

“Given Akrotiri’s pivotal role as a staging post for the RAF, this trip has provided a fantastic opportunity for us to work alongside the movements team here as we continue to develop our understanding of the impressive payload capabilities of our new aircraft.”

photo Cpl Goddard RAF

photo Cpl Goddard RAF

Partager cet article
Repost0
6 mars 2015 5 06 /03 /mars /2015 08:30
Air strikes in Iraq (updated 4 March 2015)

 

4 March 2015 Ministry of Defence

 

British forces have continued to conduct air operations to assist the Iraqi government in its fight against ISIL.

 

The ISIL terrorist network has again been struck by Royal Air Force (RAF) aircraft in Iraq.

 

On the morning of Monday 2 March, a pair of RAF Tornado GR4s led other coalition aircraft in an attack on a series of ISIL fortified positions south of Kirkuk. These bunkers posed a potential threat to offensive operations by the Kurdish peshmerga, who have also benefitted from equipment and extensive training provided by British and coalition military instructors.

 

Meanwhile, in western Iraq, RAF Reapers provided close air support to an Iraqi Army offensive in Anbar province. The retreating ISIL terrorists sought to hold up the Iraqi advance with numerous improvised explosive devices. One vehicle-borne bomb posed a particular obstacle to the Iraqi ground forces, so a Reaper destroyed the vehicle with a Hellfire missile. Later that night, another Reaper assisted Iraqi troops who had come under fire from the terrorists, carrying out an attack with a Hellfire missile on the ISIL position.

Partager cet article
Repost0
3 mars 2015 2 03 /03 /mars /2015 17:50
Britain invests in facilities for F-35 aircraft

 

LONDON, Feb. 23 (UPI)

 

Britain says it is building facilities for operation of its future F-35 Lightning II aircraft fleet at a Royal Air Force base in the east of the country.

 

Nearly $462 million is being invested in Eastern England for facilities to handle F-35 Lightning II aircraft, the Ministry of Defense reported. The funding will be directed at RAF Marham, with work planned to begin on infrastructure and facilities by the end of this year. The construction work will create 1000 new jobs directly in the construction phase of the project and an additional 700 jobs in the supply chain, the ministry said.

 

Read more

 

Partager cet article
Repost0
3 mars 2015 2 03 /03 /mars /2015 12:50
Photo Steve Lympany - RAF Brize Norton

Photo Steve Lympany - RAF Brize Norton

 

28.02.2015 source RAF Brize Norton

 

The RAF takes possession of its second Airbus A400M at RAF Brize Norton. The aircraft, ZM402, arrived at the airfield on the afternoon of the 27th February and was met by Officer Commanding LXX Squadron, Wing Commander Simon Boyle.

 

More info about RAF Brize Norton:

www.raf.mod.uk/rafbrizenorton/

Partager cet article
Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories