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15 avril 2014 2 15 /04 /avril /2014 12:50
First Sea Lord Admiral Sir George Zambellas

First Sea Lord Admiral Sir George Zambellas

 

 

15 April 2014 Ministry of Defence

 

The First Sea Lord has said that the security of Scotland and the rest of the UK would be compromised if the Scottish choose independence.

Today, 15 April, Admiral Sir George Zambellas has written an article in The Telegraph about the potential impact of Scottish independence on the Royal Navy’s people, ships and submarines that help keep the United Kingdom safe.

In the article, the professional Head of the Royal Navy sets out why Scottish independence would damage Britain’s maritime security. He also writes about the bond between Scotland and the rest of the UK, and the vital role Scotland plays in maritime defence.

He said:

I believe that independence would fundamentally change maritime security for all of us in the United Kingdom and damage the very heart of the capabilities that are made up of the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Royal Fleet Auxiliary and the Fleet Air Arm.

While the continuing United Kingdom would eventually adapt and cope, the deeper impact would be felt in Scotland which would no longer have access of right to the security contribution of one of the finest and most efficient navies in the world.

Read the article in The Telegraph in full here.

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14 avril 2014 1 14 /04 /avril /2014 16:50
Ecosse : l’avenir de la base des sous-marins nucléaires de Faslane inquiète Londres

 

13 avril 2014. Portail des Sous-Marins

 

L’inquiétude demeure mesurée, mais elle est bien réelle. Dans les milieux de défense britanniques, des préoccupations s’expriment, à mesure que les intentions de vote montent pour un oui au référendum sur l’indépendance de l’Ecosse, le 18 septembre. Car l’Ecosse est d’importance stratégique : elle abrite de nombreuses installations militaires, dont la base de sous-marins nucléaires de Faslane.

 

Référence : Le Monde

Naval Base Clyde - Faslane photo UK MoD

Naval Base Clyde - Faslane photo UK MoD

Note RP Defense : View all Vanguard Class

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11 avril 2014 5 11 /04 /avril /2014 07:30
Ships of Op Recsyr Removing Chemical Weapons from Syria

 

20.02.2014 Photographer: L(Phot) Alex Knott - UK MoD

 

Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose (bottom right) takes formation with other ships from Norway and Denmark as part of Operation Recsyr (REmoval of Chemical weapons from SYRia) near Cyprus in February 2014.

 

The operation is a crucial step in the international mission to eliminate the chemical weapons programme of the Syrian Arab Republic by June 2014.

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8 avril 2014 2 08 /04 /avril /2014 11:45
HMS Portland photo Dean Wingrin

HMS Portland photo Dean Wingrin

 

 

07 April 2014 by Dean Wingrin

 

The British Royal Navy (RN) is making use of the opportunities provided by the Naval Base Simon’s Town maintenance facilities to conduct exercises with the South African Navy (SAN).

 

The Type 23 anti-submarine frigate HMS Portland arrived in Cape Town last Friday as part of a routine seven month deployment as the Royal Navy’s Atlantic patrol ship.

 

Having left Devonport on 13 January 2014, Portland has just spent three months on maritime security activities off the coast of West Africa before heading south to South Africa.

 

Commander Sarah West, Commanding Officer HMS Portland, said that the presence of Portland reinforces the particularly strong partnership that extends between the RN and the SAN, from the strategic to the tactical level. West is the first female Commander of a Royal Navy ship.

 

The Royal Navy sends two ships a year for a maintenance period in Simon's Town, with other ships using the facilities on an ad-hoc basis.

 

“That's because we value the work that goes on there. It also provides us with an excellent opportunity to work with the South African Navy,” West said.

 

Prior to her arrival in Cape Town, Portland conducted exercises for 24 hours with the South African Navy submarine SAS Charlotte Maxeke, during which time West said that the South African submarine “demonstrated her effectiveness and professionalism.”

 

West told defenceWeb that the South African Navy has the advantage in knowing the waters off southern Africa very well, making the exercises with the diesel-electric submarine (SSK) very challenging.

 

“The submarine took advantage of the distinct thermal layers,” West explained, including the ability to submerge below the sonar level.

 

“We think she took advantage of that and the environmental conditions because it was quite choppy out there, so we couldn’t actually see her periscope if it had come up,” West clarified.

 

Portland also launched her Lynx Mk 8 maritime helicopter during the exercise, although the helicopter is not fitted with sonar.

 

Despite the challenging conditions, West felt it was a very good experience, providing a tremendous training benefit for both the RN and the SAN.

 

“From a navy that does not have an SSK, it really is beneficial to us to be able to train with such an asset. It is very, very quiet, a very good piece of kit,” West noted.

 

Following a two day R&R break at the Table Bay V&A Waterfront, Portland will commence a two-week maintenance period at Naval Base Simon’s Town. Once alongside, the ship will disembark its Lynx helicopter to visit 22 Squadron at AFB Ysterplaat. This South African Air force squadron operates the Super Lynx and Oryx helicopters.

 

The aircrew of both units will engage in some enjoyable flying, but also conduct tactical and operational flying. Not only will they be able to exchange practices and procedures, but this will allow them to build up a shared experience while exercising should they be called upon to perform operations together.

 

The success of the joint exercise with the SAN certainly has made an impression on the RN. “We're looking to make that a regular occurrence, we're looking to bring more units down and do it on a more regular basis,” West said.

 

HMS Portland is one of thirteen Type 23 Duke Class frigates serving as the mainstay of the surface fleet in the Royal Navy. Commissioned into the RN on 3 May 2001, HMS Portland was originally developed to hunt submarines with a towed array sonar. She was upgraded in 2012 with improvements to her main 4.5” Mk 8 MOD1 gun and the installation of additional and improved sensors and computer systems. This, the RN says, makes her one of the most advanced frigates at sea today, able to operate globally and undertake a wide range of roles.

 

Whilst in Cape Town, the ship’s company will engage in various sporting outreach activities with children from the local community.

 

Following the maintenance period at Naval Base Simon’s Town, Portland will continue her patrol in the south Atlantic, visiting South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

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8 avril 2014 2 08 /04 /avril /2014 07:50
A Royal Navy's tied BAS glider in the Antarctic. Photo Royal Navy

A Royal Navy's tied BAS glider in the Antarctic. Photo Royal Navy

 

7 April 2014 naval-technology.com

 

The UK Royal Navy has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) to develop a framework to enable unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) to be deployed from anti-submarine warfare warships.

 

Under the terms of the agreement, the Royal Navy and NOC will work together and share ideas to develop a new working strategy.

 

NOC National Marine Facilities director Geraint West said that the NOC will apply its capabilities and considerable experience in marine autonomous systems.

 

"The Natural Environment Research Council has already invested considerable funding into this area over recent years, principally through the science minister's 'eight great technologies' initiative, and working with the Royal Navy, therefore makes good sense for the UK taxpayer," West said.

 

"The memorandum of understanding is a significant step in the relationship between the NOC and the Royal Navy that takes us into a new phase of mutual cooperation, enabling the two parties to work together in sharing ideas and developing a working strategy."

 

Although the Royal Navy does not have a mature UUV capability, its collaboration with the NOC will provide the basis for trialling and understanding how the UUVs can be best used.

 

Navy Command Headquarters commodore Guy Robinson said: "This is an exciting opportunity as we develop this new area of our capability."

"The memorandum of understanding is a significant step in the relationship between the NOC and the Royal Navy that takes us into a new phase of mutual cooperation."

 

Currently, plans are underway for the launch of two UUVs from the navy's warships; one from a survey ship in the south-west Approaches near Plymouth and the other from a minehunter in the Mediterranean.

 

The Royal Navy environmental information officer Nick Hammond said that the idea is to have the UUVs deployed on board the navy's anti-submarine warfare platforms.

 

"We chose the survey ship and minehunter because they both work with similar equipment," Hammond said. "The information that the UUVs provide would be essential to their operation and the aspiration from these trials is to demonstrate that UUVs would make a difference to anti-submarine warfare."

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7 avril 2014 1 07 /04 /avril /2014 16:50
Royal Marines launch final attack as part of exercise

Royal Marines from 40 Commando conducting a unit level attack on the Edingham Castle exercise area [Picture: Petty Officer Airman (Photographer) Sean Clee, Crown copyright]

 

7 April 2014 Ministry of Defence

 

As part of Joint Warrior, Royal Marines of 40 Commando were put through their paces on the damp fields of Edingham Castle in Scotland.


 

In what was their final attack, the 4 companies of marines waited in wet, muddy woods while surrounding a mocked-up village before firing blank rounds and dummy grenades at the ‘enemy’.

As part of the scenario there were also civilian casualties that needed treatment and fleeing citizens that required protection.

Royal Marines from 40 Commando
Royal Marines from 40 Commando prepare to deploy as an amphibious task force from Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel Lyme Bay [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Will Haigh, Crown copyright]

Royal Marines troop commanders made sure those that needed first aid were treated while trying to ensure villagers were not caught up in the attack.

Marine Chris McDougal, of 4 Troop, B Company, 40 Commando, said:

Battle prep for this has been going on for a while and we have been well prepared for what we might face.

We have been laying up since the early hours in a wood block, and it was rainy and wet, but as soon as we began the assault the adrenaline kicked in and we forgot about it.

Royal Marines board a Sea King helicopter
Royal Marines from 40 Commando board a Sea King helicopter on HMS Illustrious [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Will Haigh, Crown copyright]

To reach the enemy, troops from A,B,C and D companies had to fight their way through buildings and smallholdings with steep embankments and criss-crossed tracks, all of which was made harder by the mud and chilly conditions.

The assault, which began at around 5:00am, was the culmination of an exercise which began on Sunday night, with Royal Marines landing ashore from helicopters launched from HMS Illustrious at 3 locations in Luce Bay.

An RAF Chinook
An RAF Chinook on HMS Illustrious' flight deck [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Will Haigh, Crown copyright]

From there they had to free the Castle Kennedy Airfield from the enemy; part of a rebel army that opposed a fictional government as part of a Joint Warrior exercise scenario.

There were other major attacks before the marines made their way to the last enemy stronghold of Edingham Castle.

Marine McDougal added:

The exercise all this week has been really good and worthwhile for us; it has tested all our skills and put everything we know into operation. This morning is going to be a long assault as this is our final one.

A Royal Marine from 40 Commando
A Royal Marine from 40 Commando firing blank rounds during the unit level attack on the Edingham Castle exercise area [Picture: Petty Officer Airman (Photographer) Sean Clee, Crown copyright]

Exercise Joint Warrior involves all 3 military services but is Europe’s largest naval exercise.

More than 34 warships from the UK, US, the Netherlands, France, Denmark, Turkey and Norway are taking part, with the aim of testing the high readiness of the forces involved and the range of capabilities available for short-notice operations across the globe.

A Royal Marine evacuates a casualty
A Royal Marine evacuates a casualty during the unit level attack on the Edingham Castle exercise area [Picture: Petty Officer Airman (Photographer) Sean Clee, Crown copyright]

The personnel involved will use the exercise to prepare for imminent deployments to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East where they will carry out activities such as maritime security operations, reassuring allies and providing humanitarian disaster relief.

Exercise Joint Warrior finishes on 11 April.

Royal Marines treating a civilian casualty
Royal Marines from 40 Commando treating a civilian casualty [Picture: Petty Officer Airman (Photographer) Sean Clee, Crown copyright]
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7 avril 2014 1 07 /04 /avril /2014 12:50
Europe's largest military exercise impresses minister

Mark Francois at the Combined Joint Task Force Headquarters at RAF Halton during Exercise Joint Warrior [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, Crown copyright]

 

7 April 2014 Ministry of Defence

 

Armed Forces Minister Mark Francois has witnessed first-hand how Europe's largest military exercise is co-ordinated.

 

Joint Warrior, a multinational exercise currently taking place off the coast of Scotland, incorporates all 3 of the UK armed services; the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force. Over the course of 3 weeks it will engage more than 35 warships, 25 different types of aircraft, and a total of nearly 13,000 personnel from the various participating nations.

Last week, Mr Francois visited RAF Halton, which is acting as headquarters for the exercise, where he received a detailed update. While there the minister learned more about those participating, and the scope, complexities and massive scale of the exercise.

Mr Francois said:

Exercise Joint Warrior represents a valuable opportunity to demonstrate the vast range of capabilities available for contingency operations and provides excellent training to test the high readiness of our armed forces.

This exercise sees us working with many of our international allies and this year will be the largest live, tactically-focused exercise held in Europe.

The level of management and co-ordination required is formidable and I was extremely impressed by what I witnessed at Joint Warrior’s headquarters at RAF Halton.

Joint Warrior sees ships, submarines, aircraft and ground troops from the UK, United States, the Netherlands, France, Turkey and other Nato allies battling each other at sea, in the air and on land in an area which stretches from the Irish Sea, north to Cape Wrath and east to the Moray Firth.

The Royal Navy has 12 ships taking part in the exercise, ranging from amphibious vessels, destroyers and frigates to mine countermeasures vessels. The crews involved will use the exercise to prepare for their imminent deployments to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East.

There are also around 1,300 commandos from 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines, including force elements from 24 Commando Engineer Regiment and 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, embedded across the ships.

The Royal Air Force is providing fast jet aircraft in the form of Hawks, Tornados and Typhoons, simulating enemy aircraft and missiles as well as providing conventional air warfare capability.

The British Army is represented on the exercise by members of 16 Air Assault Brigade. They are supported by rotary assets from all 3 services, with Apache, Chinook, Sea King, Lynx, Merlin and Puma helicopters providing critical attack support and reconnaissance capabilities.

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5 avril 2014 6 05 /04 /avril /2014 16:50
HMS Trenchant photo Royal Navy

HMS Trenchant photo Royal Navy

 

April 4, 2014 By Richardd Tomkins  (UPI)

 

British engineering company Babcock has received a four-year support services contract for naval electronic warfare systems.

 

Babcock of Britain is to provide in-service support for the Communications Electronic Support Measures system on Royal Navy Trafalgar-class submarines.

 

The company said the four-year Ministry of Defense contract for the CESM system, known as Eddystone, encompasses post-design services and support for supporting infrastructure ashore.

 

Work will include engineering support, integrated logistics support, obsolescence management, configuration management, help desk, stores management, and ensuring fully functional capability on the in-service platforms.

 

CESM is an electronic warfare system that supports intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance sensors systems.

 

“The Eddystone system remains at the forefront of CESM capability and this contract award demonstrates confidence in Babcock’s ability to support this key capability, delivering a very high system availability with the systems performing well while on mission,” said Babcock Integrated Systems & Support Group Director Charles John. “This together with our Type 23 Hammerhead CESM system underline our increasing capability to deliver and meet the customer’s requirements as a one stop shop.”

 

The engineering and technology company was the prime contractor for the design and development of the system.

 

A value for the contract was not disclosed.

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1 avril 2014 2 01 /04 /avril /2014 19:50
UK Armed Forces participate in Exercise Joint Warrior 2014

UK Army personnel patrolling with Scimitar vehicles during a previous Exercise Joint Warrior. Photo: Mark Owens, Crown copyright.

 

1 April 2014 army-technology.com

 

The UK Armed Forces is participating in Europe's biggest tri-service military exercise, code-named Joint Warrior 2014, off the coast of Scotland.

 

The exercise, which started on 25 March, involves more than 35 warships, 25 different types of aircraft, and approximately 13,000 personnel from the various nations taking part, including Turkey, Germany, Belgium, France, Holland, Denmark, and the US.

 

All participating ships, submarines, aircraft and ground troops from the UK, US and other allies are battling each other at sea, in the air and on land in an area that stretches from the Irish Sea, north to Cape Wrath and east to the Moray Firth.

 

UK International Security Strategy Minister Dr Andrew Murrison said Joint Warrior continues to provide realistic training platforms for the UK Armed Forces, testing the vast capabilities of all three services.

 

"This exercise sees us working with our international allies, including the US, Netherlands, France, Turkey, Norway and Nato, and will be the largest live, tactically-focused exercise held in Europe this year," Murrison said.

 

The Royal Navy has deployed 12 ships, including amphibious vessels, destroyers, frigates and mine countermeasures vessels, which will be used by the crews to prepare for their imminent deployments to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East.

 

The UK Army is represented by 16 Air Assault Brigade personnel, who will be joined by the Royal Air Force (RAF), army and Commando Helicopter Forces, as well as Apache, Chinook, Sea King, Lynx, Merlin and Puma helicopters for the provision of critical attack support and reconnaissance capabilities.

 

As well as supplying fast jet aircraft such as Hawks, Tornados and Typhoons, the RAF will also simulate enemy aircraft and missiles, and provide conventional air warfare capability.

 

In addition to this, RAF surveillance aircraft will provide a detailed picture of enemy movements and positions to the Royal Navy, while the Tactical Supply Wing will supply logistic support to air assets.

 

Joint Warrior provides a valuable opportunity to demonstrate the range of capabilities available for contingency operations, while providing excellent training that tests the high-readiness capabilities of the armed forces.

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1 avril 2014 2 01 /04 /avril /2014 07:50
Inside HMS Queen Elizabeth
 

As the 100 day countdown begins the Daily Telegraph have released a video well worth watching

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1 avril 2014 2 01 /04 /avril /2014 07:50
Making the Most of The F35 B

 

One of the fundamental changes in SDSR 2010 was to select the F35C over the F35B. The rational for this was that the F35C could also replace the Tornado and cover the RAF’s Future Offensive Air System requirement as well as the Joint Combat Aircraft requirement designed to replace the Harrier. However once it became clear that the cost of converting the aircraft carriers would be in the £ 5 billion pound range the decision was taken to revert back to the B model. However despite the decision to revert back to the B model no decision was taken to replace the Tornado with something else. The F35B will now have to serve as both a Harrier replacement and a Tornado replacement.

 

Having F35B as a replacement for the Harrier will give us capabilities light years ahead of what we had. Despite the criticisms of the B model in comparison to the Harrier it is a major capability improvement. However as a replacement for the Tornado the F35B does have limitations. I believe there are some relatively simple fixes that the UK can use to overcome the limitations of the B model so that it can serve as an effective replacement for the Tornado.

 

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1 avril 2014 2 01 /04 /avril /2014 07:20
Northrop Grumman Wins Supplier Award for Role in Royal Navy's Astute Submarine Programme

 

LONDON – March 26, 2014 – Northrop Grumman Corporation

 

Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) has received the Customer Focus Award from BAE Systems Maritime-Submarines in recognition of the role the company has played in supplying the platform management system (PMS) for the U.K. Ministry of Defence's (MOD) Astute nuclear-powered submarine programme.

The award was presented during BAE's 2014 Annual Supplier Forum to Northrop Grumman's Sperry Marine business unit in recognition of its performance in the integrated deployment and management of the programme's resources and for continuously improving performance standards in delivery and support.

"Our extensive track record of delivering reliable, high-performance navigation and ship control solutions has helped to establish us as a preferred supplier for Royal Navy platforms," said Alan Dix, managing director, Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine. "This award is a great achievement and we are proud to be contributing to the most capable submarine ever built for the Royal Navy."

Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine is supplying the PMS to BAE Systems Maritime–Submarines for installation on the Royal Navy's Astute Boat 4 and under an innovative performance partnering arrangement for boats 5, 6 and 7 at its shipyard in Barrow-in-Furness, U.K.

The PMS includes control and monitoring software, human interface equipment and programmable logic controller-based hardware located throughout the submarine. All hardware has been system-engineered to meet naval standards for shock, vibration, temperature and electromagnetic compatibility requirements and meets the stringent safety requirements for this type of vessel.

Based on Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine's innovative approach to configuring commercial off-the-shelf hardware and software to meet exacting military and commercial applications, the PMS is expected to reduce life cycle costs and minimize programme risk for the MOD. The system provides an advanced network design that includes the stringent levels of safety and redundancy associated with nuclear submarine control systems. The open architecture design of the PMS is also expandable and versatile allowing it to interface with third-party equipment via standard field-bus technology.

Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine in the U.K. has had a long and successful relationship with the Royal Navy, supplying and supporting machinery control systems, navigation radars, gyrocompasses and other navigation equipment. The company has also provided the PMS for the Royal Navy's Type 45 destroyers and the Hunt Class Minehunters, and is supplying the integrated navigation and bridge System for the Queen Elizabeth Class carriers. The company has provided ships' inertial navigation systems for a variety of the Royal Navy's other surface ships and submarines.

The Sperry Marine business unit is headquartered in New Malden, U.K., and has major engineering and support offices in Hamburg, Germany. It provides smart navigation and ship control solutions for the international marine industry with customer service and support in numerous locations worldwide.

 

Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in unmanned systems, cyber, C4ISR, and logistics and modernization to government and commercial customers worldwide. Please visit www.northropgrumman.com for more information.

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28 mars 2014 5 28 /03 /mars /2014 20:50
Merlin Mk2 off the Lizard photo Ian Harding, Air International

Merlin Mk2 off the Lizard photo Ian Harding, Air International

 

04/03/2014 Royal Navy

 

The Royal Navy’s new submarine-hunting helicopters will face their greatest test yet when they head into the Atlantic this June in the biggest exercise of its kind this century.

 

Probably not since the days of the Cold War have so many Royal Navy helicopters been sent to sea on an aircraft carrier for the purpose of hunting submarines as on Exercise Deep Blue in the Western Approaches.

Nine Merlins from RNAS Culdrose in Cornwall will join HMS Illustrious to practise skills which were once the mainstay of the Royal Navy’s aircraft carrier operations at the height of the tensions with the Soviet Union.

It’s the first time the latest version of the Merlin – the Mk2 – has been tested en masse.

After more than a decade on the front line, the Merlin fleet – based at RNAS Culdrose in Cornwall – is in the midst of a £750m revamp which will help to keep them at the forefront of naval warfare until the end of the 2020s.

Two of the four Merlin squadrons have already been converted to the improved helicopter – which looks the same outwardly, but inside is a completely new box of tricks – including the first front-line unit, 820 Naval Air Squadron.

It will spearhead Deep Blue, with eight new Mk2s due to join the Portsmouth-based carrier, plus one Mk1 – the largest concentration of submarine-hunting helicopters in recent memory, and the largest ever concentration of Merlins at sea.

Nine Merlins on one carrier is a sight no-one has seen – and one no-one involved will ever forget,” said Cdr Ben Franklin, Commander of the Royal Navy’s Maritime Merlin Force.

“We’re looking forward to it big time – the younger guys especially. They’ve heard all the stories about what we did back in the days of the Cold War because, if the balloon goes up, this is what we do.”

A couple of next-generation Merlins from 820 NAS have just returned from a NATO anti-submarine exercise off Norway, Dynamic Mongoose, where they clocked up 60 hours in the skies over the North Sea.

For the first time a Mk2 tracked a boat using both its active ‘dipping sonar’, lowered into the Atlantic to look for boats, and active sonobuoys – which are dropped into the water to do the same.

Dynamic Mongoose was a ‘toe in the water’. Deep Blue is on a far grander scale.

For three Merlins to hunt submarines continuously around the clock – using either their dipping sonar, or passive sonobuoys (‘underwater ears’) listening for them – nine helicopters are needed, hence the size of the operation.

It will also demand the efforts of around 200 personnel, including 18 aircrew – two pilots, one observer and one aircrewman each.

After a week and a half’s training around the UK by day and night, Illustrious and her helicopters will move out into the expanse of the Atlantic for Deep Blue itself, which reaches its climax in mid to late June.

Nine Merlins on one carrier is a sight no-one has seen – and one no-one involved will ever forget

Commander Ben Franklin, Commander of the Royal Navy’s Maritime Merlin Force

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28 mars 2014 5 28 /03 /mars /2014 13:50
UK to lead major military exercise off coast of Scotland

Flight deck operations on HMS Illustrious during Exercise Joint Warrior (library image) [Picture: Petty Officer (Photographer) Ray Jones, Crown copyright]

 

27 March 2014 Ministry of Defence

 

Multinational forces will be training off Scotland this weekend as part of Europe's largest military exercise.

 

 

Exercise Joint Warrior will be hosted in the UK and will incorporate all 3 UK armed services: the Royal Navy, the British Army and the Royal Air Force (RAF).

The exercise, which began on 25 March, will engage more than 35 warships, 25 different types of aircraft, and a total of nearly 13,000 personnel from the various participating nations, which include the USA, Turkey, Germany, Belgium, France, Holland and Denmark.

Ships, submarines, aircraft and ground troops from the UK, US and other allies will be taking part, battling each other at sea, in the air and on land in an area which stretches from the Irish Sea, north to Cape Wrath and east to the Moray Firth.

Exercise Joint Warrior represents a valuable opportunity to demonstrate the range of capabilities available for contingency operations and provides excellent training which tests the high readiness capabilities of the armed forces.

Dr Andrew Murrison, Minister for International Security Strategy, said:

Exercise Joint Warrior is an initiative dating back over 30 years and continues to provide realistic training platforms for our armed forces, testing the vast capabilities of the 3 services.

This exercise sees us working with our international allies, including the US, Netherlands, France, Turkey, Norway and Nato, and will be the largest live, tactically-focused exercise held in Europe this year.

HMS Bulwark's landing dock
Royal Marines from 42 Commando prepare to launch an amphibious assault from HMS Bulwark's landing dock (library image) [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Nicky Wilson, Crown copyright]

The Royal Navy has 12 ships taking part in the exercise, including amphibious vessels, destroyers, frigates and mine countermeasures vessels.

The crews involved will use the exercise to prepare for their imminent deployments to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Middle East, where they will carry out activities including deterring adversaries, conducting maritime security operations, reassuring allies and providing humanitarian disaster relief.

Nearly 1,300 commandos from 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines, including force elements from 24 Commando Engineer Regiment and 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, will be embedded across the ships, enabling them to undertake a large-scale amphibious assault on a beach in Cumbria.

The RAF will provide fast jet aircraft in the form of Hawks, Tornados and Typhoons, and will simulate enemy aircraft and missiles as well as providing conventional air warfare capability. In addition to this, RAF surveillance aircraft will supply the Royal Navy with a detailed picture of enemy movements and positions.

The British Army will be represented on the exercise by members of 16 Air Assault Brigade, who will be joined by RAF, Army and Commando Helicopter Forces, with Apache, Chinook, Sea King, Lynx, Merlin and Puma helicopters providing critical attack support and reconnaissance capabilities.

Logistic support to air assets will be provided by the Tactical Supply Wing of the RAF.

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26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 17:50
100 days to go until new aircraft carrier is named

The Queen Elizabeth at the shipyard in Rosyth (library image) [Picture: Aircraft Carrier Alliance]

 

26 March 2014 Ministry of Defence and Defence Equipment and Support

 

The 100-day countdown to the naming of the Royal Navy's new aircraft carrier has begun.



oday, 26 March, marks 100 days to go until the historic event and major milestone in the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier programme.

The Queen Elizabeth will be officially named by Her Majesty The Queen in a ceremony at Rosyth on Friday 4 July. The naming of the carrier comes 5 years after the first steel was cut on the ship and only 33 months since the first section entered the dry dock at Rosyth marking the start of her assembly.

Ian Booth, Queen Elizabeth (QE) Class programme director at the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, said:

The excitement around the naming of the Queen Elizabeth continues to grow and the daily countdown will undoubtedly add further momentum to this. We’re working hard to prepare the ship and plan the celebrations which will mark this significant phase in the programme to deliver the nation’s flagships.

Getting to this point is testament to the hard work and commitment of everyone involved in the programme, from the teams across the Aircraft Carrier Alliance to our suppliers in every region of the country.

Computer-generated image of a Queen Elizabeth Class carrier
Computer-generated image of a Queen Elizabeth Class carrier alongside a Type 45 destroyer at sea (library image) [Picture: Aircraft Carrier Alliance]

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:

The naming ceremony in July will be a significant step forward for the Royal Navy and industry who have been working hard to make sure HMS Queen Elizabeth is on track to deliver carrier strike capability by 2020.

Combined with the Lightning II aircraft, the QE Class will bolster the Royal Navy’s ability to project power across the world and there is a lot of excitement about the ship nearing completion after years of hard work by thousands of highly skilled workers.

With the vessel now structurally complete, outfitting work continues on the carrier in the lead up to her naming and subsequent ‘flood up’, which will take place in mid-July. Meanwhile, work continues on sections of Queen Elizabeth’s sister ship, the Prince of Wales, at sites across the UK, with assembly at Rosyth beginning later this year.

The Queen Elizabeth at the shipyard in Rosyth
The Queen Elizabeth at the shipyard in Rosyth (library image) [Picture: Aircraft Carrier Alliance]

The aircraft carriers Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the Ministry of Defence.

The QE Class will be the centrepiece of Britain’s defence capability for the 21st century. Each 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier will provide the armed forces with a 4-acre military operating base which can be deployed worldwide operating Joint Strike Fighter Lightning II jets and a number of types of helicopter.

The carriers will be versatile enough to be used across the full spectrum of military activity from war-fighting to providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

Join in the conversation and countdown on Twitter @QEClassCarriers, and follow the programme’s progress on the Aircraft Carrier Alliance website.

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26 mars 2014 3 26 /03 /mars /2014 08:50
Britain's largest warship nears completion

Britain's two Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers are seen in an undated computer generated graphic provided by manufacturer BAE Systems. Britain will build both of its planned aircraft carriers and keep a "wide range" capabilities, ministers said on Sunday, as they sought to calm fears that next week's military review would severely degrade the armed forces.

 

26 Mar 2014 By Alan Tovey - telegraph.co.uk

 

In exactly 100 days, the Royal Navy’s biggest ever warship will be named by the Queen, who will smash a bottle of champagne on the 65,000 tonne aircraft carrier’s bow and name the vessel after herself.

The ceremony will mark 16 years of work on the £6.2bn project which now employs 10,000 people at 100 firms working in every region of the country.

 

Britain's largest warship nears completion

When the HMS Queen Elizabeth becomes operational in 2020, she will deliver a radical change in the Navy’s capabilities, with her 4.5 acres of flight deck and 40 F35B joint strike fighters able to deliver bombs with pinpoint accuracy hundreds of miles away.

Capt Simon Petitt, the senior naval officer on board, is an engineering specialist who leads 100 or so Navy personnel, working with staff from Babcock, British Aerospace and Thales who form the Carrier Alliance which is delivering the Navy’s new generation of carriers. Although he won’t go to sea in this 280m leviathan when she enters service, he describes his job as “writing the operating manual” for this new class of highly advanced ship.

“What we don’t want is lots of really clever equipment on board and the Royal Navy lagging behind it,” he says.

With a nod to the fact that the budget for the project — which is for two carriers, with the HMS Prince of Wales 20 months behind the first ship — has almost doubled from the initial £3.65bn price-tag, he adds: “We’ve got to make sure we get the most out of this investment … but you do get a lot of ship for your money.”

The HMS Queen Elizabeth’s most notable advance on the Harrier jump-jet carrying Invincible class which preceded her is size — her flight deck is almost three times as big.

“The larger flight deck means we generate 72 [flights] a day, surging to 108 if we have to,” he says. “But it’s not just about jets, we will also bring helicopters on board — for example the Apache which was used in Libya.”

The second difference he highlights is the level of automation, which cuts the “through life” cost of operating the ship because fewer sailors are needed.

One example is the ammunition system. At the touch of a keyboard, missiles and bombs for the aircraft are ordered up from the magazines deep in the ship, moving on computer-controlled sleds up through lifts to near the hangar deck where a human gets hands on them for the first time. Here they have fuses and fins fitted as they are “built” on what Capt Petitt likens to a “Model T Ford” production line, ready to be hung off aircraft.

The result is that just 32 sailors can do the work that once required 200. The HMS Queen Elizabeth needs only 679 crew to sail it, rising to 1,600 when including the personnel to operate its air wing. By comparison, the US Nimitz class carriers require 3,000 sailors to get under way and a further 1,800 to operate their aircraft.

The final major improvement over earlier vessels is the integration of the design. “If you take a destroyer or a frigate, it is a weapon system wrapped up in a ship to transport it around,” says Capt Petitt. “Carriers are different. Although the aircraft are our weapons, the essence to get them operating well is organisation.

“It will take 20 people half a day to replenish this ship. In previous carriers that job would take 100 people two or three days.”

Walking around such a huge vessel it was easy to get lost in its 3,000 compartments across 12 decks — until BAE Systems developed “Platform Navigation”, an encrypted app to guide people around ship. Using software loaded onto an ordinary Samsung smartphone, workers scan QR codes posted over the vessel to provide an on-screen route. Normal satellite navigation cannot penetrate the carrier’s armoured hull.

Mick Ord, managing director at BAE Naval Ships, said: “These are the largest and most powerful warships ever produced for the Navy so we need to keep finding smarter, safer and more efficient ways of working”.

The carrier was built in modules at six shipyards across the UK, which were brought together at Rosyth. You can stand in the ship with one foot in a piece that came from Portsmouth and the other in a module that came from Glasgow.

And putting it together has been no mean feat for the engineers at Rosyth.

“We are talking about tolerances of millimetres here,” says Capt Petitt. “Though it’s not as accurate as the submarines, the volume level means the cost of getting it wrong is immense.” Considering the size of the parts in this giant kit, that is a remarkable achievement — the largest section weighed 11,000 tonnes.

“To put that in perspective,” says Capt Petitt, “that’s bigger than most ships in the Navy. A Type 45 destroyer weighs 8,500 tonnes.”

This is the Blue Riband of British engineering. Tom Gifford, the integration manager responsible for bringing this massive project together at Rosyth, has been building ships for 49 years.

Looking up proudly at this massive vessel, he says he has no doubt about how he will feel once it’s finished. “Relieved,” he says with a smile.

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25 mars 2014 2 25 /03 /mars /2014 17:50
UK and US demonstrate new concepts for landing F-35 aircraft on carriers

An F35 simulator. Photof BAE Systems

 

25 March 2014 naval-technology.com

 

The UK and the US have jointly conducted piloted flight simulation trial at the BAE Systems' F35 Simulation facility at Warton to test new concepts for landing fixed wing aircraft on aircraft carriers.

 

The trials demonstrated a new shipborne rolling vertical landing (SRVL) manoeuvre concept, designed by BAE for recovering the UK Ministry of Defence's (MoD) Lockheed Martin-built F-35C Lightning II joint strike fighter on to the deck of its new Queen Elizabeth-class (QEC) aircraft carriers.

 

Both the nations have developed enhanced aircraft flight controls and displays for the F35C carrier variant arrested recovery and the F35B short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) variant SRVL recovery to the aircraft carrier.

 

During the testing, the enhanced control law modes for F35C arrested recoveries have been validated to a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, resulting in positive feedback from the US Navy and F35 test pilots.

 

The US Naval Air Systems Command Aeromechanics division James Denham said: "During this trial we've identified improvements to deliver more accurate touchdowns, less bolters and reduced pilot training.

 

"Ultimately, what we've been able to test in this simulated environment allows us to inform future concepts of operation," Denham added.

 

The SRVL manoeuvre offers enhanced 'bring back' payload, including weapons and fuel, capability for the F-35 aircraft when compared to vertical landings owing to the wing lift created by forward airspeed at touchdown.

 

Further trials to test the same control law mode for F35B SRVL recoveries are scheduled to commence soon for the UK's QEC aircraft carriers with the US Navy observing.

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19 mars 2014 3 19 /03 /mars /2014 08:50
Wildcat Type 45 Destroyer Deck Landing First

 

18/03/2014 by Paul Fiddian - Armed Forces International's Lead Reporter

 

The Royal Navy's next-generation AgustaWestland Wildcat helicopter has landed on a Type 45 Destroyer's deck for the first time. The landing paves the way for the Wildcat to start replacing the Fleet Air Arm's Westland Lynx HMA8 helicopter from 2015 onwards.

 

Currently, the Wildcat is being trialled by 700W Naval Air Squadron based at RNAS Yeovilton, Somerset, UK. Five Wildcat airframes are being routinely put through their paces ahead of the type's scheduled entry-into-service next year.

 

Two variants of the Wildcat have been developed - one for the Royal Navy, the other for the British Army. The Fleet Air Arm will get 28 Wildcats and they'll be equipped with two new weapons - the LMM (Lightweight Multirole Missile) and the FASGW (Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon) - along with heavy and general purpose machine guns.

 

Wildcat Destroyer Landing

 

The Wildcat Destroyer landing trial involved HMS Dragon - the fourth Type 45 ship produced, which was handed over to the Royal Navy in August 2011. Like its counterparts HMS Daring, HMS Dauntless, HMS Diamond, HMS Defender and HMS Duncan, HMS Dragon is a multirole-capable vessel capable of undertaking surveillance, anti-piracy, disaster relief aid and other missions.

 

Its flight deck can accommodate two Wildcats or a single Westland Merlin HM1 anti-submarine helicopter and its armament includes the Sea Viper air defence system, Harpoon anti-ship missiles and a 4.5 inch Mark 8 naval gun.

 

Type 45 Deck Trials

 

"Today is a small, but exciting, step in the progression of this new capability and I am delighted that HMS Dragon was able to help", commanding officer, Captain Iain Lower, explained in a statement on the Type 45 deck trials. "I look forward to seeing what the aircraft can do when we put it through its paces later this month."

 

"This year will be one of many firsts for the Wildcat crews as we work with our industry partners to get the aircraft to sea as soon as we can", added 700W NAS' commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Simon Collins, in the MoD's Wildcat deck landing press release. "Deck landings on board a Type 45 at sea are a real milestone and it was a pleasure to join the HMS Dragon team to show them what Wildcat can do."

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18 mars 2014 2 18 /03 /mars /2014 19:50
New Wildcat helicopter drops in on HMS Dragon

    A Wildcat, the navy's next-generation helicopter, has landed for the first time on the flight deck of a Type 45 destroyer at sea.

 

Mar 18, 2014 ASDNews Source : Ministry of Defence

 

The Royal Navy’s Wildcat, the maritime attack variant of the Lynx helicopter, is currently undergoing extensive trials with 700W Naval Air Squadron. As part of those trials, the aircraft has been working at the MOD’s aerial range in Cardigan Bay.

 

From next year, Wildcat will begin to replace the Lynx Mark 8 as the helicopter which supports Royal Navy destroyer and frigate operations around the world.

 

Read more

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13 mars 2014 4 13 /03 /mars /2014 13:50
La sécurité des sous-marins britanniques en question après une fuite radioactive

 

13.03.2014 Par Eric Albert (Londres, correspondance) LE MONDE

 

Une fuite radioactive dans un centre de recherche de l'armée britannique, tenue secrète pendant plus de deux ans, pose aujourd'hui la question de la durée de vie des quatre sous-marins nucléaires Vanguard, qui transportent l'armement atomique britannique.

Révélé le 6 mars à la Chambre des communes par le ministre de la défense, Philip Hammond, cet incident aura pour conséquence le remplacement anticipé du réacteur nucléaire d'au moins un de ces sous-marins, peut-être de deux, pour un coût qui ira jusqu'à 270 millions de livres (320 millions d'euros). « C'est comme une voiture rappelée à l'usine pour vice de forme », persifle un bon connaisseur militaire.

La fuite a eu lieu dans le laboratoire militaire Vulcan Naval Reactor Test Establishment, à Dounreay, dans le nord de l'Ecosse. Un réacteur nucléaire expérimental du même modèle que ceux utilisés dans les Vanguard y est installé. Pour l'armée britannique, c'est une façon de le tester et de le pousser au maximum, pour détecter à l'avance de potentielles failles dans les sous-marins.

 

LE RÉACTEUR EXPÉRIMENTAL ARRÊTÉ DANS L'URGENCE

En janvier 2012, « des niveaux faibles de radioactivité ont été détectés dans le circuit d'eau de refroidissement entourant le coeur du prototype », a expliqué M. Hammond. Selon lui, la fuite est due à « une rupture microscopique » du revêtement métallique du combustible.

Le ministre s'est voulu rassurant. L'incident nucléaire est classé de « niveau zéro », « sans signification sur la sécurité ». Personne n'a été mis en danger. L'agence écossaise de protection de l'environnement, la SEPA, confirme. Mais elle souligne que les émissions de gaz rares radioactifs ont fortement augmenté pendant cette période, de 4 % à 43 % de la limite autorisée. Dans la mesure où les seuils limites n'ont pas été franchis, elle n'a pas alerté la population.

Reste pourtant de nombreux éléments troublants. Après l'incident, le réacteur expérimental a dû être arrêté dans l'urgence. Il a fallu ensuite attendre onze mois, soit jusqu'en novembre 2012, pour qu'il reprenne du service. « Le même incident dans un sous-marin qui patrouillerait serait bien plus sérieux, estime l'analyste Hugh Chalmers, du Royal United Services Institute. Cela forcerait à le retirer du service et cela mettrait en danger ceux qui sont à l'intérieur. »

 

SENSIBLE À SIX MOIS DU RÉFÉRENDUM SUR L'INDÉPENDANCE

De plus, les autorités militaires se sont murées dans un silence complet. Lors des réunions trimestrielles avec les associations de riverains et les autorités locales, les responsables de Vulcan ont affirmé n'avoir « pas grand-chose à rapporter ».

Ce silence provoque la colère des indépendantistes, au pouvoir en Ecosse. « Le ministère de la défense a activement trompé la communauté locale. Comment est-ce que les gens vont le croire, maintenant ? », attaque Rob Gibson, le député écossais local. Pour les nationalistes, qui ont promis de mettre fin au nucléaire en Ecosse et ne veulent plus accueillir l'arsenal atomique, le sujet est très sensible à six mois du référendum sur l'indépendance.

Enfin, le gouvernement britannique tire une conclusion militaire importante de cet incident. Il va remplacer le cœur nucléaire du Vanguard, le plus ancien des quatre sous-marins, lors de sa prochaine mise à sec de trois ans, programmée à partir de fin 2015. Le réacteur, installé en 2002, était pourtant prévu pour durer jusqu'en 2024. « Il n'aura réalisé que la moitié de son service prévu », souligne M. Chalmers.

 

AGACEMENT ET DÉMORALISATION DANS LES RANGS DE LA NAVY

L'opération va coûter 120 millions de livres (140 millions d'euros). L'armée britannique se réserve ensuite la possibilité de faire de même sur le Victorious, le deuxième plus ancien sous-marin de la flotte, lors de sa maintenance prévue en 2018. Cela coûterait 150 millions de livres.

Ces coûts supplémentaires s'inscrivent dans le cadre d'un budget de la défense déjà tendu. En vingt ans, la flotte de la Royal Navy a été réduite par deux, au point de provoquer agacement et démoralisation dans les rangs de l'ancienne première puissance maritime du monde.

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12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 19:50
£20 million contract for new Royal Navy ships

An Amazonas Class offshore patrol vessel built for the Brazilian Navy [Picture: Copyright BAE Systems]

 

12 March 2014 Ministry of Defence and Defence Equipment and Support

 

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has signed a £20 million contract to buy parts for the Royal Navy's 3 new offshore patrol vessels (OPVs).

 

It was announced in November last year that MOD would purchase the ships which will be built, subject to approval, by BAE Systems.

Today, 12 March, during a visit to the company’s shipyards on the Clyde in Scotland, Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Philip Dunne announced that MOD has committed £20 million to the programme.

The contract will enable BAE Systems to begin work on parts such as the engines and gearboxes, which require a longer time to make and therefore have to be ordered in advance of the main shipbuilding programme.

The Royal Navy’s OPVs are set to be built later this year by BAE Systems at their Clyde shipyards, which employ approximately 3,000 people.

Computer-generated image of the Royal Navy’s new OPV
Mick Ord, Managing Director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, and Defence Minister Philip Dunne view a computer-generated image of the Royal Navy’s new OPV [Picture: Copyright BAE Systems]

Mr Dunne said:

This £20 million is a significant milestone, critical to the successful delivery of these 3 vessels for the Royal Navy.

The OPVs will not only provide an additional capability for the UK but also, at its peak, the OPV programme will safeguard more than 800 vital skilled roles in the shipbuilding industry.

OPVs can be used to support counter-terrorism, counter-piracy and anti-smuggling operations in the waters around the UK and other UK interests abroad.

Compared to the current River Class ships, the new OPVs will be larger, with more storage and accommodation facilities and a larger flight deck for Merlin helicopters.

The first OPV is expected to be delivered to the Royal Navy in 2017.

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7 mars 2014 5 07 /03 /mars /2014 13:50
HMS Vanguard - photo Royal Navy

HMS Vanguard - photo Royal Navy

 

 

6 March 2014 Ministry of Defence and Defence Equipment and Support

 

The nuclear reactor in HMS Vanguard is to be refuelled, the Defence Secretary has announced.

 

 

In an oral statement to the House of Commons, the Defence Secretary, Philip Hammond, has announced his decision to refuel the nuclear reactor in HMS Vanguard during its planned deep maintenance period which begins in 2015.

The decision comes after low levels of radioactivity were detected in a prototype core that has been running at the Naval Reactor Test Establishment at Dounreay in Scotland since 2002.

The purpose of the prototype is to help assess how the reactor cores within submarines will perform over time. It has therefore been run for significantly longer periods and at a significantly higher intensity than those cores of the same type in submarines to allow MOD to identify early any age- or use-related issues that may arise later in the lives of the operational reactor cores.

Radiation exposure for workers and discharges from the site have remained well inside the strictly prescribed limits set by the regulators. Workers therefore remain safe and the local community is not at risk.

Indeed, against the International Atomic Energy Agency’s measurement scale for nuclear-related events this issue has been classed as ‘Level 0’, described as ‘below scale – no safety significance’. The Naval Reactor Test Establishment is, and remains, a very safe and low-risk site.

The refuelling of HMS Vanguard will enable her to operate successfully and safely in the future.

During his statement, Philip Hammond said:

The safety of the UK’s naval nuclear reactor at the test establishment at Dounreay and on our submarines is of critical importance to us, as is the maintenance of continuous at-sea deterrence. That is why I have taken the decision to apply the precautionary principle, even though there is no evidence at this stage that the problem detected with the test reactor is likely to present in the operational reactors.

The refuelling will increase our confidence that Vanguard will be able to operate effectively and safely until the planned fleet of Successor submarines begins to be delivered from 2028.

The refuelling will be conducted within the currently planned dry dock maintenance period for Vanguard, which starts in late 2015 and will last for around 3-and-a-half years, and is therefore expected to have no impact on deterrent operations. The additional cost of refuelling Vanguard is estimated to be around £120 million over the next 6 years.

These low levels of radioactivity are a normal product of a nuclear reaction that takes place within the fuel, but they would not normally enter the cooling water. This water is contained within the sealed reactor circuit, and there has been no detectable radiation leak from that sealed circuit.

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5 mars 2014 3 05 /03 /mars /2014 08:50
HMS Tireless steams past Type 23 frigate HMS Westminster during an exercise

Photo by UK MoD


Trafalgar Class nuclear submarine HMS Tireless steams past Type 23 frigate HMS Westminster during an exercise, as seen from Westminster's Lynx helicopter. [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Dan Rosenbaum, Crown copyright]

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18 février 2014 2 18 /02 /février /2014 21:50
Hydroid REMUS 600 UUV Royal Navy Contract Extension

 

February 18, 2014 by Think Defence

 

The MoD has just awarded an £1.5m contract extension to Hydroid to support and maintain the Royal Navy REMUS 600 (RECCE) Underwater Unmanned Vehicles (UUV) out to 31st March 2016

 

Hydroid are now part of the Kongsberg Group

 

The REMUS 600 came into service in 2009complimenting the smaller REMUS 100 UUV’s that entered service a few years early.

10215388466 8659a4b65c z Hydroid REMUS 600 UUV Royal Navy Contract Extension Royal Navy Mine Countermeasures

10215388266 87c7507c70 z Hydroid REMUS 600 UUV Royal Navy Contract Extension Royal Navy Mine Countermeasures

10215276594 e8e59ab22b z Hydroid REMUS 600 UUV Royal Navy Contract Extension Royal Navy Mine Countermeasures

10215277174 f6bd211b23 z Hydroid REMUS 600 UUV Royal Navy Contract Extension Royal Navy Mine Countermeasures

 

Read more on Think Defence about naval mines countermeasures and hydrographic survey (it is subject I have written quite a bit about)

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/09/dsei-2013-highlight-mine-countermeasures-sea-land/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/09/ship-shore-logistics-09-current-capabilities/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/10/ship-shore-logistics-14-expeditionary-port-access-concept-1-survey-munitions-clearance/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/05/icmx-2013/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2012/10/international-mine-countermeasures-exercise-2012/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2012/10/maritme-mines-countermeasures-update/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2011/10/naval-mine-countermeasures/

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2011/05/counter-port-denial-in-misrata/

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16 février 2014 7 16 /02 /février /2014 11:50
Le HMS « Daring » intégré au GAN « Charles de Gaulle »

 

 

15/02/2014 Marine nationale

 

Actuellement dans la dernière phase de l’opération « Bois Belleau », le groupe aéronaval constitué autour du porte-avions « Charles de Gaulle » vient d’intégrer la frégate de défense aérienne de la Royal Navy le HMS « Daring ». Elle s’inscrit dans la montée en puissance incrémentale du Combined Joint Expeditionary Force (CJEF).

 

Quelques jours après le sommet franco-britannique entre le ministre de la Défense Jean Yves Le Drian et son homologue Philip Hammond, ayant notamment permis la conclusion de différents accords bilatéraux, la collaboration en matière de défense entre la France et le Royaume-Uni a encore une fois été mise en lumière de façon concrète. Cette intégration s’inscrit dans la perspective de la montée en puissance incrémentale du « Combined Joint Expeditionnary Force » (CJEF), dans sa composante maritime. Du 8 au 15 février, la frégate de défense aérienne type T45 de la Royal Navy « Daring »,de retour d’une mission de longue durée, a été intégrée au sein du groupe aéronaval placé sous le commandement du contre-amiral Eric Chaperon. De la Mer Rouge à la Méditerranée, en passant par le Canal de Suez, le rôle de cette frégate a été d’assurer aux côtés de la FDA «       Forbin », la protection rapprochée du porte-avions « Charles de Gaulle ».

 

Au titre de cette mission primordiale, les marins britanniques ont multiplié les manœuvres aux côtés de leurs homologues français afin de renforcer leurs aptitudes à opérer au cœur d’un groupe aéronaval. Ainsi, plusieurs ADEX*, entraînements aussi utiles pour les pilotes de Super Etendard Modernisé et de Rafale Marine, que pour les marins chargés de la protection anti-aérienne des unités du GAN, ont été réalisés.

 

Le 15 février au matin, le HMS « Daring » a reçu « liberté de manœuvre » pour terminer son déploiement indépendant. Cette intégration au cœur de la « French Navy Gobal Strike Force »  conforte l’utilité d’une coopération pragamatique et incrémentale entre ces deux marines, les deux premières en Europe. Le Combined Joint Expeditionnary Force (CJEF) maritime en sera le couronnement.

 

* Air Defense Exercise

Le HMS « Daring » intégré au GAN « Charles de Gaulle »
Le HMS « Daring » intégré au GAN « Charles de Gaulle »
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