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11 novembre 2015 3 11 /11 /novembre /2015 20:35
Weapons: Snipers Break Another Distance Record

 

November 11, 2015: Strategy Page

 

Note RP Defense: "visiblement" nos amis américains ne lisent pas le français.

 

The distance record for sniper kills has been broken again [in 2012 !!], this time by two Australian snipers in Afghanistan using M82A1 12.7mm (.50 caliber) rifles. In a coordinated shot at a Taliban leader 2,800 meters away the two snipers fired simultaneously and six seconds later the Taliban chieftain fell dead. It will never be known which of the two shots got him. The victim would not have heard the shot, the rifles were so far away and the bullet was travelling faster than the speed of sound. About two seconds later anyone with the dead Taliban man would have heard the two shots, but faintly as the shooters were nearly three kilometers (two miles) away.

 

The previous record shot was made in November 2009 by a British sniper (corporal Craig Harrison) who killed two Taliban in Afghanistan, at a range of 2,620 meters (8,596 feet). He did this with a L115A3 rifle firing the 8.6mm Lapua Magnum round. Before that the record was held by a Canadian soldier, corporal Rob Furlong, who dropped an al Qaeda gunman at 2,573 meters (7,972 feet) in 2002, also in Afghanistan with a 12.7mm rifle. These weapons are good at 2,000 meters or more, but weigh twice as much as the 6.8 kg (15 pound) 8.6mm rifles.

 

In 2007 the British Army began replacing most of its 3,000 7.62mm L96A1 sniper rifles with one modified to use the .338 (8.6mm) Lapua Magnum caliber round. This Accuracy International "Super Magnum" rifle is basically a L96A1 "Arctic Warfare" rifle modified to handle the larger, 8.6mm Lapua Magnum round. The L115A1 weighed 6.8 kg (without a scope), was 1.27 meters (fifty inches) long and had a 686mm (27 inch) barrel and a five round magazine.

 

Snipers in Iraq, and especially Afghanistan, had been calling for a smaller long range round because they found the 12.7mm weapons too heavy. The .338 (8.6mm) Lapua Magnum round has an effective range (about 1,500 meters) about 50 percent greater than the 7.62mm standard NATO round. Like most long range rounds, if the weather (clear) and winds (calm) are right, you can hit targets farther away. Those were the conditions Harrison encountered when he took his three shots (the third one hit the machine-gun the two Taliban were using.)

 

The 8.6mm round entered use in the early 1990s, and became increasingly popular with police and military snipers. Dutch snipers have also used this round in Afghanistan with much success, and have a decade of experience with these larger caliber rifles. Recognizing the popularity of the 8.6mm round, Barrett, the pioneer in 12.7mm sniper rifles, came out with a 7 kg (15.5 pound) version of its rifle, chambered for the 8.6mm.

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1 octobre 2015 4 01 /10 /octobre /2015 16:56
Tir longue distance: record du monde pour un militaire du 1er RCA

 

01/10/2015 armée de Terre

 

3695 m avec un fusil de précision 408 Cheytac : c’est la portée du tir réalisé par l’adjudant Benjamin le 22 août dernier. Record du monde battu !

 

Trois ans de préparation ont été nécessaires à l’adjudant, chef de peloton blindé au 1er régiment de chasseurs d’Afrique (1er RCA – Canjuers), et à son équipe pour surpasser le précédent record à 3400 m. «  En juin 2014, lors d’un entraînement  à 2960 m, nous sommes parvenus à mettre 4 balles sur 7 dans une cible de 200 cm x 200 cm. C’est à cet instant que nous avons pris conscience des capacités extraordinaires du calibre 408 Cheytac, idéal pour le tir longue distance».

 

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30 juillet 2015 4 30 /07 /juillet /2015 11:55
photo Armée de Terre

photo Armée de Terre

 

29/07/2015 Armée de Terre

 

Le caporal Sébastien nous livre ses impressions sur son travail de spotter.

 

Le spotter accompagne le tireur, veille sur sa sécurité et s'assure qu'il puisse faire son travail le mieux possible. Il donne au tireur la position des cibles repérées à la jumelle et lui transmet également des informations sur la force et la direction du vent. Découvrez son témoignage.

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29 juillet 2015 3 29 /07 /juillet /2015 12:55
Portrait d'un tireur d'élite

 

29/07/2015 Armée de Terre

 

Le soldat de 1re classe Lenny nous livre ses impressions sur son travail de tireur d'élite.

 

Le binôme tireurs d'élite (TE) est composé d'un tireur d'élite et d'un spotter qui peuvent se voir attribuer diverses missions allant du renseignement à la destruction de cibles. Ils agissent fréquemment au-delà des lignes adverses, dans la profondeur, et de manière autonome. Le tireur agit sur commande et doit être capable d'éliminer une cible à longue distance, si possible en un tir. Si vous voulez en savoir plus, rendez-vous demain pour le portrait du spotter.

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13 février 2015 5 13 /02 /février /2015 17:20
Serenity sensor Pods on a Kestrel-stabilized frame.- photo US Army

Serenity sensor Pods on a Kestrel-stabilized frame.- photo US Army

 

February 11, 2015: Strategy page

 

In 2014 there were further advances in sniper detection systems. The latest one (Serenity) incorporates acoustic and heat sensors as well as cameras (actually vidcams that are used in real time) and a RWS (Remote Weapons System) turret that is linked to the sensors and uses special software to quickly locate the source of the fire (rifle, machine-gun, mortar, rocket) and point the vidcams and RWS weapon (usually a 12.7mm machine-gun) at the source of the fire, enabling the human operator to immediately open fire before the enemy (especially a sniper) gets away. The software also captures video and other data for every instance that the system is alerted by what seems to be an attack. This all such events, whether they led to return fire or not, can be studied and analyzed. Serenity was developed by a U.S. Army research organization (AMRDEC) and was able to work with over a decade of similar work in this area.  Part of Serenity, the acoustic detection (called Firefly) is sometimes used separately.

 

Acoustic gunfire (sniper) detectors have been in the field for over a decade, and have gotten better each year. By 2010 over 60,000 sniper detectors had been shipped to American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, where they were increasingly useful and generated a continuous flow of user suggestions for improvements. These were addressed and that resulted in new and improved models appearing every year.

 

The first sniper detection systems simply provided directional information about where the snipers are. The troops always wanted detectors that were faster and more accurate and after several generations of these systems showing after that first heavy use in 2004 you end up with something like Serenity. A really important improvement was manufacturers tweaking these systems to decrease the number of false alarms. Also important was improved user interface and increased accuracy. There were other reasons for all this progress, including major advances in computing power, sensor quality and software development. By 2010 the latest sniper detectors could provide nearly instant, easy to comprehend and accurate location info on the sniper.

 

One of the first, and most useful, sniper detection system was Boomerang, which was it was developed in a few months, in response to a 2004 U.S. Department of Defense request for an affordable acoustic sniper detector. Testing delayed it from entering service immediately. Boomerang was mounted on vehicles, was in wide use by 2o06 and cost about $5,000 each. Boomerang was effective enough to get initial orders for over 10,000 units, and lots of use from the troops who had it. There were two major upgrades, prolonging the service life of the system.

 

British, American, French and Israeli manufacturers have produced most of these systems, which are also sold to police organizations. The systems have varied greatly in capabilities, and price. Some of the first ones cost over $200,000, but prices have been dropping rapidly over the last five years, as the technology matured.

 

An example of the constant development of new tech was SWATS (Soldier Worn Acoustic Targeting Systems). In 2011 U.S. Army infantry in Afghanistan began receiving SWATS sniper detectors. About 1,500 a month were delivered and there were never enough of them once the usefulness of the system became known. These 183 g (6.4 ounce) devices come in two pieces. One is the sensor, which is worn on the shoulder, while the cell phone size controller, with small LCD display, is worn in front, where it can be quickly glanced at. SWATS calculates (from the sound weapon fired) direction of fire in a tenth of a second. SWATS cost about $2,000 each. SWATS was also be mounted on vehicles, and worked when the vehicle is moving at speeds of 80 kilometers an hour or more.

 

At the same time German firm Rheinmetall introduced a similar vehicle-mounted acoustic sniper detection system called ASLS (Acoustic Shooter Locating System). The Germans had been working on this for over a decade and were following the American firms that had, because of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan taken the lead in this effort.

 

As the capability and reliability of these devices has improved, the troops came to depend on sniper detectors and these detectors saved hundreds of American lives in Iraq and Afghanistan because with a sniper detector troops could quickly turn on the enemy shooter and deliver accurate fire of their own. This made it difficult, if not impossible, for the sniper to get off a second shot and made the sniper more vulnerable to getting shot. Moreover Arab and Afghan snipers were not always good enough to always get a hit with their first shot and the nervousness created by the knowledge that the American troops would quickly fire where the sniper was because of sniper detectors made it even more likely that the first shot would miss. It got to the point where trying to get off a second shot was suicidal and Taliban and Iraqi snipers were trained to only take a first shot if they were certain of a hit and be ready to immediately duck and move after that first shot.

 

The new Serenity system is meant for base protection or mounting on vehicles. Parts of the Serenity system were sent to Afghanistan in 2012 for field testing.

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4 février 2015 3 04 /02 /février /2015 12:30
Infantry: Israel Makes Life Hard For Snipers

 

January 23, 2015:  Strategy Page

 

During the 50 Day War with Hamas in July-August 2014 Israel tested some new infantry equipment. This consisted of a new bullet-proof protective vest that is 15 percent lighter than existing ones. Israeli infantry do not regularly wear this type of heavy vest, but a lighter one that protects from shell and grenade fragments as well as most pistol bullets and ricochets from rifle and machine-gun bullets. To provide protection from snipers and machine-gun bullets SAPI (Small Arms Protective Inserts) were developed. These ceramic or polycarbonate plates are inserted in the front and rear of the protective vest. The basic "Level 3" SAPI plates are 25.4x305cm (10x12 inches) and weigh 2.1 kg (4.6 pounds) each. The new Israeli plates are lighter and thus easier for soldiers to wear for long periods. It’s very hot in Israel most of the time so the weight soldiers have to carry is particularly important. The SAPI plates double the weight of a protective vest so most of the time Israeli troops go without it. The lighter weight SAPI plates were popular in Gaza, particularly since Hamas used a lot of snipers. Only 400 of the new SAPI vests were available for testing, but 20,000 more are being ordered so large numbers of troops can use them is needed.

 

Also tested were new goggles, both day and night versions. These use shatterproof material and proved popular. Also much appreciated were the new ear protection, which kept very loud noises out. Max peak noise reduction was 30 db. Normal conversation is 65 db, a loud motorcycle is 110 db, a nearby jet engine is 140 db, a nearby shotgun blast is 165 db and battlefield explosions are often 180 db. Thus a 30 db reduction makes a big difference because noises over 140 db can be painful and lead to temporary or permanent hearing loss. With the new ear plugs troops could adjust these ear plugs to different levels of sound suppression.

 

There is also a new helmet in development that is lighter and provides better protection from sniper bullets. Providing better protection from high-powered sniper rifle bullets is important as Hamas and Hezbollah have learned that this is a very effective way of killing Israeli soldiers. In general Israeli troops will quickly defeat Hamas or Hezbollah gunmen in a fire fight, but a few snipers not only increases Israeli fatalities but also forces the Israeli troops to operate more deliberately and slowly, allowing more Arab gunmen to get away from a battle they are losing.  Israel has also pioneered the development and manufacturing of sniper detection equipment. But this is only useful after a sniper has fired. For pretection before that you need SAPI.

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19 mars 2014 3 19 /03 /mars /2014 08:20
USAF Declares Initial Operational Capability for LM's Sniper ATP-SE

 

 

Mar 17, 2014 ASDNews Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation

 

The U.S. Air Force declared initial operational capability (IOC) for Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] Sniper® Advanced Targeting Pod - Sensor Enhancement (ATP-SE) and has now deployed the system to support combat operations in theater.

 

An enhanced configuration of Sniper ATP, Sniper ATP-SE provides U.S. Air Force strike fighter and bomber aircraft with advanced modes for non-traditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; improved combat identification; expanded air-to-air and maritime capability; and two-way data link communication. Lockheed Martin won the U.S. Air Force’s ATP-SE competition in 2010.

 

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22 novembre 2013 5 22 /11 /novembre /2013 08:20
Les systèmes de détections «Deep Vision» équiperont les «Colt» des «snipers» canadiens

Colt Canada est depuis longtemps un fournisseur de fusils et d'armes légères pour l'armée canadienne et ses tireurs d'élite (Colt)

 

21/11/2013 par Jacques N. Godbout - 45eNord.ca

 

Deep Vision et Colt Canada signent un accord en vue d’intégrer le système de détection autonome de Deep Vision aux systèmes de contrôle de tir automatiques Colt Canada, y compris le système «Sword» (Sniper Weapon & Observer Reconnaissance Devices (SWORD) Technology Demonstrator).

Le système SWORD de Colt non seulement permet à l’observateur de désigner des cibles pour plusieurs tireurs, mais, avec ce système, les tireurs d’élite peuvent également partager des données à travers le réseau (Colt)

Deep Vision a déclaré par voie de communiqué à ce propos que cet accord permettra aux systèmes automatisés de contrôle de tir de Colt de se démarquer grâce à l’intégration de son système de détection automatique de cible.

Colt Canada pour sa part affirme dans le communiqué annonçant cet accord que l’entente avec Deep Vision permettra d’augmenter la capacité , les opportunités de marché et la valeur de son offre de systèmes de contrôle de tir automatiques en intégrant la technologie d’ exploitation de la sonde Deep Vision.

Le protocole d’entente vise à établir des principes concernant cette proposition de collaboration qui, disent les deux sociétés, devrait aboutir à des résultats commerciaux positifs mutuellement bénéfiques pour les deux parties – en particulier en ce qui a trait à l’amélioration des prototypes de systèmes de contrôle de tir de Colt Canada et démontrer ainsi clairement la capacité qu’a Deep Vision d’améliorer leur capacité fonctionnelle en ce qui concerne l’autonomie , l’exactitude , l’utilité et la précision .

Deep Vision développe des capteurs et systèmes de perception pour l’industrie de la défense et l’aérospatiale.

La technologie de Deep Vision permet le suivi d’objets en temps réel.

Le système de «tracking» Deep Vision (Deep Vision)

Les données des capteurs sont traitées rapidement et présentées dans une forme qui permet un classement et une analyse efficace.

Les images, créées à partir des données brutes, couplé avec leur position sur le capteur et les positions relatives dans le temps, fournissent la base pour le suivi d’objets en temps réel.

Avec et sans connaissance préalable des objets ciblés, ou de leurs caractéristiques, la technologie de suivi d’objets de Deep Vision offre une solution de verrouillage de cible fiable, en temps réel.

Quant à Colt Canada, il est est depuis longtemps un fournisseur de fusils et d’armes légères pour l’armée canadienne et ses tireurs d’élite, en plus d’être le fournisseur de plusieurs corps de police dans le monde.

«Pendant plus de 35 ans», souligne le communiqué de l’entreprise, «les armes Colt Canada ont été testées et éprouvée au combat à travers la jungle de la boue, la neige et la glace arctique, le désert et les conditions de combat extrêmes.».

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8 juillet 2013 1 08 /07 /juillet /2013 20:55
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)

08/07/2013 defense.gouv.fr

 

Du 24 au 28 juin 2013, le challenge TELD (tireur d'élite longue distance) s'est déroulé au CEITO. 17 groupes provenant de régiments d'infanterie ont répondu à l'invitation.

En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)
En plein dans le mille (Diaporama)

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8 juillet 2013 1 08 /07 /juillet /2013 05:55
Challenge national pour les tireurs d’élite

06/07/2013 Sources : EI Armée de Terre

 

Du 24 au 27 juin 2013, l’école de l’infanterie, en partenariat avec le CEITO (Centre d’Entraînement de l’Infanterie au Tir Opérationnel), a organisé pour la première fois un challenge national de tireur d’élite longue distance (TELD) du niveau groupe.

 

L’objectif de ce challenge tactique était d’évaluer les groupes TELD de différentes unités dans un environnement tactique, dans des conditions proches du combat. 9 ateliers de jour et 3 ateliers de nuit ont permis aux groupes de se mesurer les uns aux autres dans une saine émulation : tirs longues distances après effort entre 600 et 1650m, course d’orientation avec tirs entre 250 et 950m, tir aux points à 500m, déplacement tactique avec tirs entre 600 et 1800m, test d’identification, etc. Au terme de ces 4 jours et 3 nuits, le 126erégiment d’infanterie (126eRI) s’est distingué en remportant la 1eplace.

 

Ce premier challenge a été un franc succès, grâce à la motivation et au bon esprit qui animaient les 17 groupes issus de 15 régiments d’infanterie, mais aussi grâce à l’implication du personnel du CEITO et à la disponibilité de ses infrastructures de tir (le camp dans son intégralité était dédié au challenge).

 

Rendez-vous est d’ores et déjà pris pour l’année prochaine.

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