Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
5 juin 2015 5 05 /06 /juin /2015 20:55
D-Day Remembered


5 juin 2015 by US Navy

 

June 6th marks the 71st anniversary of D-Day, and serves as a reminder of the sacrifices made by the greatest generation.

Partager cet article

Repost0
5 juin 2015 5 05 /06 /juin /2015 07:20
USS Virginia (SSN-774) - photo US Navy

USS Virginia (SSN-774) - photo US Navy

 

GROTON, Conn., June 4, 2015 /PRNewswire

 

The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Electric Boat a $6.5 million contract modification to support development of the Virginia Payload Module (VPM). Electric Boat is a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

 

The VPM will comprise four large-diameter payload tubes in a new hull section to be inserted in Virginia-class submarines. The section will extended the hull by 70 to 80 feet and boost strike capacity by 230 percent while increasing the cost by less than 15 percent.

 

This modification is part of an overall engineering contract supporting the Virginia Class Submarine Program. The contract was initially awarded in 2010 and has a potential value of $965 million.

 

More information about General Dynamics is available at www.generaldynamics.com.

Partager cet article

Repost0
3 juin 2015 3 03 /06 /juin /2015 16:20
photo Royal Navy

photo Royal Navy



28 mai 2015 by Royal Navy

 

A group of Royal Navy and Royal Air Force personnel were at sea onboard USS WASP, joining American colleagues in the latest F-35B Lightning II fast jet trials.

Lightning II is a STOVL aircraft: Short Take Off Vertical Landing. It will place the UK at the forefront of fighter technology, giving the RAF a true multi-role all weather, day and night capability, able to operate from well-established land bases, deployed locations or the Royal Navy's Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers.

The Royal Navy’s vision for tactical integration of the F-35B into their current arsenal is similar to the Marine Corps’ plan to integrate the F-35 with legacy aircraft, such as the AV-8B Harrier and the F/A-18 Hornet, and gradually phase out legacy aircraft over the coming decades.

Read the full story: http://ow.ly/NylS6

Partager cet article

Repost0
3 juin 2015 3 03 /06 /juin /2015 16:20
photo US Navy

photo US Navy


3 juin 2015 by US Navy

 

ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 2,2 015) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57), in formation with the French tallship the Hermione in the Virginia Capes, welcomes the French vessel on the U.S. Navy's behalf. The original the Hermione brought French General Marquis de Lafayette to America in 1780 to inform General Washington of France's alliance and impending support of the American Revolutionary War. The symbolic return of the Hermione will pay homage to Lafayette and the Franco-American alliance that brought victory at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781. The Hermione will visit Yorktown, Va., June 5 and then continue up the east coast visiting cities of Franco-American historical significance. (U.S. Navy video/Released)

Partager cet article

Repost0
3 juin 2015 3 03 /06 /juin /2015 11:20
photo US Navy

photo US Navy

 

Le 2 juin en fin de journée, Le destroyer USS Mitscher accueille l'Hermione, la réplique de la Frégate du Marquis de La Fayette sur les côtes de Norfolk (USA) en Virginie . Un hommage aux marins disparus lors de la bataille décisive de Yorktown en 1781 est rendu en mer à cette occasion.

 

L'Hermione est actuellement à quai à Norfolk pour procéder aux formalités administratives avant de rejoindre Yorktown le 5 mai matin (locale) à 8h00 (14:00 HF) pour sa toute première escale publique du 5 au 8 juin 2015.

Partager cet article

Repost0
2 juin 2015 2 02 /06 /juin /2015 16:20
X-47B First to Complete Autonomous Aerial Refueling photo US Navy

X-47B First to Complete Autonomous Aerial Refueling photo US Navy

 

May 17, 2015: Strategy Page

 

The U.S. Navy’s X-47B UCAS (unmanned combat air system) continues to break or make records. Thus in 2015 this included the world's first fully autonomous aerial refueling in April, performed with a KC-707 tanker. During the last few years this unmanned combat aircraft has successfully carried out numerous operations aboard aircraft carriers. These tests were often firsts for UCAS. Thus an X-47B made its first catapult launch from an aircraft carrier on May 14th 2013. That was followed by several touch and go landings on a carrier. The first carrier landing, as expected, followed soon after. Later in the year more flight tests further stressed the capabilities of the automatic landing system, especially in high speed and complex (different directions) winds. The autolanding systems passed all these tests. The X-47B was also the first UAV to land and be off the carrier deck in less than 90 seconds, just like manned aircraft. There were a lot of other tests to see how effectively and reliably the X-47B could operate on the carrier and hanger deck and do it alongside manned aircraft. All this is part of a long-term navy plan to introduce an UCAS replacement for the F-35 (which is soon to replace the F-18s) in the 2030s. But if the UCAS progress continues to be swift and the costs low (compared to manned aircraft), the F-35 could find its production run much reduced to make room for an UCAS.

 

While software controlled landing systems have been around for decades, landing on a moving air field (an aircraft carrier) is considerably more complex than the usual situation (landing on a stationary airfield). Dealing with carrier landings requires more powerful hardware and software aboard the aircraft. The navy expected some glitches and bugs and appears to be rapidly catching up to the reliability of commercial landing software (which has been used very successfully on UAVs) within months rather than decades.

 

Rather than begin development on the slightly larger X-47C, which was be the first naval UCAV to enter service, the navy changed that plan and is now seeking new designs for a UCLASS (unmanned carrier-launched airborne surveillance and strike) aircraft. There will be a competition by development aircraft in 2016. It’s likely, but not certain, that one of those 2016 competitors will be the X-47C.

 

All this comes after the navy rolled out the first X-47B in 2008. This was the first carrier-based combat UAV, with a wingspan of 20 meters (62 feet, and the outer 25 percent folds up to save space on the carrier) and stay in the air for up to twelve hours. The 20 ton X-47B weighs a little less than the 24 ton F-18A and has two internal bays holding two tons of smart bombs. It is a stealthy aircraft. As it exists right now the X-47B could be used for a lot of bombing missions, sort of a super-Reaper. The navy has been impressed with the U.S. Air Force success with the Predator and Reaper. But the propeller driven Reaper weighs only 4.7 tons. The much larger X-47B uses a F100-PW-220 engine, which is currently used in the F-16 and F-15.

 

The X-47C was expected to be closer to 30 tons and have a payload of over four tons. The X-47B was never mean to be the definitive carrier UCAV, but the navy hoped it would be good enough to show that unmanned aircraft could do the job. Normally, "X" class aircraft are just used as technology demonstrators. The X-47 program has been going on for so long, and has incorporated so much from UAVs already serving in combat that it was thought that the X-47 may end up eventually running recon and bombing missions as the MQ-47C. But in February 2015 the navy stated that the X-47B was too costly and insufficiently stealthy to become it's carrier UCAV, and the two prototypes will be turned into museum exhibits upon completion of all flight testing, extant and length of which is not ultimately decided yet.

 

The U.S. is far ahead of other nations in UCAS development, and this is energizing activity in Russia, Europe, and China to develop similar aircraft. A Chinese UCAS, called the Li Jian was photographed moving around an airfield under its own power back in early 2013, which is the sort of thing a new aircraft does before its first flight (which took place in November, 2013). Since 2011 the Li Jian has been photographed as a mock up, then a prototype, and now taxiing around and in flight. The Li Jian is similar in size and shape to the U.S. Navy X-47B.

 

It’s generally recognized that robotic combat aircraft are the future, even though many of the aviation commanders (all of them pilots) wish it were otherwise. Whoever gets there first (an UCAV that really works) will force everyone else to catch up, or end up the loser in their next war with someone equipped with UCASs. China may have just copied pictures of the X-47B, or done so with the help of data obtained by their decade long Internet espionage operation. Whatever the case, the Li Jian is not far behind the X-47B.

 

These aircraft are meant to operate like current armed UAVs or like cruise missiles (which go after targets under software, not remote, control). Enemy jamming can interfere with remote control and you have to be ready for that. This means pre-programmed orders to continue the mission (to put smart bombs on a specific target, the sort of attack cruise missiles have been carrying out for decades) or attempt that but turn around and return to base if certain conditions were not met (pre-programmed criteria of what is an acceptable target). Fighter (as opposed to bomber) UCASs can be programmed to take on enemy fighters (manned or not) with some remote control or completely under software control. This is the future and China wants to keep up.

 

The U.S. Navy has done the math and realized that they need UCASs on their carriers as soon as possible. The current plan is to get these aircraft into service by the end of the decade. But a growing number of navy leaders want to get the unmanned carrier aircraft into service sooner than that. The math problem that triggered all this is the realization that American carriers had to get within 800 kilometers of their target before launching bomber aircraft. Potential enemies increasingly have aircraft and missiles with a range greater than 800 kilometers. The X-47B UCAS has a range of 2,500 kilometers and is seen as the solution.

 

The Department of Defense leadership is backing the navy efforts and spurring the air force to catch up. At the moment, the air force is cutting orders for MQ-9s, which are used as a ground support aircraft, in addition to reconnaissance and surveillance, because American troops are being pulled out of Afghanistan, and it is believed Reaper would not be very useful against China, North Korea, or Iran. But, as the Navy is demonstrating, you can build UCASs that can carry more weapons, stay in the air longer, and hustle to where they are needed faster. The more the navy succeeds, the more the air force will pay attention and probably use a lot of the navy developed UAV hardware and software technology.

Partager cet article

Repost0
29 mai 2015 5 29 /05 /mai /2015 16:35
photo EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

 

29/05/2015 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Les 16 et 17 mai 2015, dans le cadre de l’exercice Kitsune 2015, le BPC Dixmunde, la FLF Aconit, ainsi que le porte-hélicoptère japonais Oshumi et le destroyer américain Preble, ont réalisé des manœuvres amphibies en mer de Chine.

 

Durant le transit Shanghai – Sasebo, un porte-hélicoptères japonais et un destroyer américain ont rejoint les bâtiments français, ce qui a donné l’occasion aux équipages du Dixmude et de l’Aconit de travailler en coopération avec les deux marines partenaires pendant deux jours et deux nuits.

 

Première journée de l’exercice Kitsune 2015, le 16 mai 2015 était ainsi consacré à des vols d’hélicoptères et à des manœuvres tactiques entre les quatre bâtiments. Dès 8h30, l’exercice a commencé avec des transferts entre les militaires des trois nations. Une première rotation en PUMA entre le BPC et le porte-hélicoptère Oshumi a permis l’échange de marins français et japonais, qui ont pu participer à l’activité du bâtiment allié et échanger leurs expériences. Puis vers 9h, l’hélicoptère américain s’est présenté sur la plate-forme du Dixmude pour y déposer le commandant du l’USS Preble.

 

Ces échanges effectués, l’exercice a continué par des manœuvres tactiques interalliées longuement préparées en passerelle par les quatre bâtiments. Ces exercices, qui ont mis à l’épreuve les compétences des chefs de quart, ont aussi constitué une bonne opportunité pour les élèves officiers de mettre en pratique les acquis de leur formation.

 

Alors que l’Aconit quittait le groupe dans l’après-midi pour rejoindre la Corée, le Dixmude a continué à faire route vers le Japon pendant la nuit. Avant son arrivée à Sasebo, le bâtiment a à nouveau participé à une journée de manœuvres amphibies avec l’Ohsumi.

 

Le 17 mai 2015, les équipes du Dixmude se sont mises à l’œuvre dès 5h du matin. Les bâtiments japonais et français se sont préparés à échanger leurs engins de débarquement, « exercice qui renforce notre interopérabilité », a commenté l’officier chargé de l’organisation de Kitsune. A 8h30, le Landing Craft And Cushion (LCAC) japonais, impressionnant par sa puissance, est arrivé sur le BPC Dixmude. Au début de sa présentation, le LCAC a dégonflé ses jupes pour se poser au fond du radier du Dixmude et permettre à un second LCAC de se présenter, ce qui constituait une grande première.

 

Les mouvements amphibies terminés, le personnel du pont d’envol du Dixmude était déjà paré pour accueillir l’hélicoptère japonais CH47 (Chinook). A son bord se trouvaient le commandant de la 7e flotte américaine et le commandant en chef de la flotte d’autodéfense japonaise, dont la rencontre visait à consolider les relations avec les forces américaines et japonaises.

 

L’amiral commandant la zone maritime Pacifique, présent à bord lors de cette traversée, a félicité l’équipage pour la réussite de cet exercice « qui demandait une extrême préparation et la réalisation de manœuvres complexes ».

 

Identifié comme zone stratégique majeure par le Livre blanc de 2013, le Pacifique constitue un espace d’intérêt partagé avec nos partenaires américains et japonais. Présente dans le cadre de son dispositif des forces prépositionnées en Polynésie Française et en Nouvelle Calédonie et par le déploiement d’un commandement maritime permanent dans la zone de responsabilité Asie-Pacifique (ALPACI), la France entretient une coopération bilatérale et multilatérale riche avec les pays alliés. Parmi les partenaires régionaux, le Japon fait partie de ceux avec lesquels la France entretient un dialogue stratégique renforcé depuis 2014. Sur le plan militaire, cette coopération s’articule essentiellement autour d’échanges d’expertises et d’actions de formation et par une volonté croissante du Japon de participer aux interactions multilatérales.

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

Partager cet article

Repost0
18 mai 2015 1 18 /05 /mai /2015 07:20
Flight Ready: Magic Carpet

 

14 mai 2015  NAVAIRSYSCOM

 

MAGIC CARPET, which stands for Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies, is a new technology designed to lift the stress off of naval pilots who have to land on carriers. Watch to learn more about this control system that will reduce the pilot's workload and make carrier landings easier and safer.

Partager cet article

Repost0
13 mai 2015 3 13 /05 /mai /2015 11:35
Le groupe-école Jeanne d’Arc va faire escale au Japon

 

12 mai 2015 par portail des Sous-Marins

 

Le ministère japonais de la défense annonce ce mardi l’arrivée du groupe “Jeanne d’Arc”. A cette occasion, des bâtiments japonais et américains participeront pendant 3 jours à des exercices avec les navires français, à l’ouest de Kyushu.

 

Les exercices se dérouleront les 16, 17 et 23 mai.

 

Dans l’intervalle, les 2 navires français, le BPC Dixmude et la frégate Aconit feront escale à Sasebo, dans la préfecture de Nagasaki.

 

Parmi les navires participants, une frégate américaine et un navire japonais de transport. Des hélicoptères japonais effectueront des appontages sur les navires français.

 

Référence : Japan Times

Partager cet article

Repost0
13 mai 2015 3 13 /05 /mai /2015 11:20
USS Rushmore (LSD 47) Departs San Diego for a Deployment


12 mai 2015 by US Navy

 

The amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47) departs San Diego for a deployment in support of the Navy's maritime strategy, May 11. Rushmore is assigned to Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 3 and with the embarked 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU) is part of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group. (U.S. Navy video/Released)

Partager cet article

Repost0
11 mai 2015 1 11 /05 /mai /2015 11:35
photo US Navy

photo US Navy


10 mai 2015 by US Navy

 

SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 10, 2015) USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), USS Gridley (DDG 101) and KD Lekir (FSG 26) participate in a PASSEX exercise, aimed at developing and expanding bi-lateral exercises with the Malaysian Royal Navy. Carl Vinson Strike group is deployed to the 7th Fleet area of operation supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Samuel LeCain/Released)

Partager cet article

Repost0
29 avril 2015 3 29 /04 /avril /2015 11:30
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

 

28/04/2015 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Le 26 avril 2015, dans le cadre de son déploiement opérationnel en Méditerranée orientale, la  frégate de défense aérienne Forbin a conduit avec le destroyer américain USS Laboon différentes activités de coopération opérationnelle.

 

Cette rencontre a permis aux deux unités de partager leur expérience de la zone et de mener à bien de nombreux exercices conjoints : défense aérienne (ADEX), navigation de groupe, exercice de tirs, entraînement à l’utilisation de fréquences tactiques et de liaisons de données… Les activités aériennes n’ont pas été en reste, le Panther du détachement 36F du Forbin a pu réaliser une séance  d’appontages sur la plateforme hélicoptère de l’USS Laboon.

 

Accompagnant le commandant de l’USS Laboon, une délégation américaine composée de quartiers-maîtres, officiers mariniers et officiers de toutes spécialités (cuisinier, manœuvrier, secrétaire, opérateur du central operations, mécanicien, etc.) a été accueillie par les marins du Forbin. Cela a été l’occasion de leur faire découvrir les capacités opérationnelles du bâtiment autant que la gastronomie française, le temps du déjeuner.

 

Parallèlement, des représentants du Forbin se sont rendus à bord du destroyer américain pour améliorer leurs connaissances du fonctionnement d’une unité de l’US Navy.

 

A l’issue d’une journée riche en partage d’expérience, les deux bâtiments ont repris leur patrouille en Méditerranée orientale. Ces contacts à la mer sont autant d’occasion de renforcer l’interopérabilité avec l’US Navy, dans la perspective d’une coordination toujours plus fluide lors d’engagements conjoints.

 

Le déploiement de bâtiments de la Marine nationale en Méditerranée centrale et orientale se réalise dans le cadre d’une mission de présence quasi-permanente des armées françaises dans cette zone d’intérêt stratégique.  Il s’inscrit dans le cadre des fonctions stratégiques « connaissance – anticipation » et « prévention ». Lors de ces déploiements, les actions de coopération avec les marines alliées sont régulières.

photo Marine Nationalephoto Marine Nationale
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

Partager cet article

Repost0
28 avril 2015 2 28 /04 /avril /2015 11:20
photo US Navy

photo US Navy


23 avr. 2015 by US Navy

 

PATUXENT RIVER, Md. (April 22, 2015) The X-47B successfully conducted the first ever Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR) of an unmanned aircraft April 22, completing the final test objective under the Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System demonstration program. (U.S. Navy video/Released)

Partager cet article

Repost0
27 avril 2015 1 27 /04 /avril /2015 11:30
photo EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

 

17/04/2015 Sources : Etat-major des armées

 

Le 11 avril 2015, dans le cadre de l’opération Chammal, le pétrolier-ravitailleur Meuse a ravitaillé le porte-avions américains Carl Vinson.

 

Plusieurs heures avant le début du ravitaillement, alors que la Meuse approche du point de rendez-vous convenu, le Carl Vinson apparait au radar. Rapidement, la silhouette de l’imposant navire se dessine sur l’horizon. Ce soutien logistique est un défi technique de taille. En effet le navire américain, par sa taille et ses 93 000 tonnes, nécessite une adaptation inédite de la part de l’équipage de la Meuse. Le porte-avions Carl Vinson déplace une telle masse d’eau qu’il est impossible de trop s’en approcher sans risquer un effet d’aspiration et donc une colision.

 

Le ravitaillement s’est donc effectué à une distance de sécurité, quasiment aussi loin que le permettent les manches de transfert des carburéacteurs. La communication s’est faite en anglais, la tenue de poste du porte-avions américain a été parfaite, et la concentration des soldats français et américains a été totale. Sur chaque bord, la curiosité apparaissait sur les visages des marins.

 

Cette opération a été couronnée de succès, fruit d’une longue préparation commune avec l’état-major américain. Cette mission est emblématique de notre coopération franco-américaine en matière de ravitaillement et de soutien logistique. C’est aussi une illustration des capacités de la Marine française en matière de soutien logistique et d’interopérabilité avec nos alliés.

 

Lancée depuis le 19 septembre 2014, l’opération Chammal mobilise 3 200 militaires. Elle vise, à la demande du gouvernement irakien et en coordination avec les alliées de la France présents dans la région, à assurer un soutien aérien aux forces irakiennes dans la lutte contre le groupe terroriste autoproclamé Daech. Le dispositif complet est actuellement structuré autour de douze avions de chasse de l’armée de l’Air (six Rafale et six Mirage 2000D), d’un avion de contrôle aérien E3F, d’un avion de patrouille maritime Atlantique 2, et du groupe aéronaval et de son groupe aérien embarqué (douze Rafale Marine, neuf Super Etendard modernisés et un Hawkeye).

photo EMA / Marine Nationalephoto EMA / Marine Nationalephoto EMA / Marine Nationale
photo EMA / Marine Nationalephoto EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

Partager cet article

Repost0
17 avril 2015 5 17 /04 /avril /2015 21:30
Une journée à bord du porte-avions américain USS Carl Vinson (U.S. Navy)

 

17 avr. 2015 Crédit : État-major des armées / Marine nationale

 

Opération Chammal, avril 2015
 

Partager cet article

Repost0
13 avril 2015 1 13 /04 /avril /2015 16:30
Passex franco-américaine pour le « Cassard »

 

10/04/2015 Sources : Etat-major des armées

 

Le 7 au 8 avril 2015, la frégate antiaérienne Cassard, déployée en Méditerranée depuis le 26 mars, a conduit aux larges des côtes de Chypre, une série des manœuvres conjointes avec les unités de la marine américaine présentes dans cette zone.

 

Le Cassard a réalisé des exercices avec les deux destroyers de l’US Navy l' USS Laboon et l' USS Ross, qui sont, au même titre que les bâtiments français, des acteurs incontournables dans la  Méditerranée, région d’intérêt stratégique pour la France. L’objectif de ces manœuvres était le renforcement de l’interopérabilité des deux marines alliées.

 

Transferts de personnels, tirs d’artillerie conjoints, évolutions tactiques et appontages et décollages de l’hélicoptère français Panther sur les bâtiments américains ont rythmé ces deux journées. Au cours de ces activités, notamment par la précision de leur tir, les équipages français et américains ont pu constater qu’ils avaient un savoir-faire et des procédures très similaires, permettant d’obtenir des performances équivalentes.

 

Ce type de coopération permet aussi de partager avec nos alliés dans cette région des procédures communes, mais aussi des informations, analyses des menaces et retour d’expériences différents qui participent pleinement à l’appréciation générale de situation. Cet entraînement a aussi renforcé l’interopérabilité et les liens de confiance qui existent depuis des décennies entre les deux marines amies.

 

Déployée en Méditerranée orientale depuis le 20 mars, la frégate Cassard y a relevé la frégate La Fayette. Dans cette partie de la Méditerranée traversée par d’importants flux maritimes et dont plusieurs pays riverains connaissent de graves tensions, le Cassard prend part à la sécurisation et au contrôle des voies maritimes et participe au recueil de renseignement et à l’entretien de la connaissance générale de la zone.

 

Au cours de leurs missions en méditerranée orientale, les bâtiments français conduisent régulièrement des entraînements avec les pays riverains, mais également avec des navires alliés présents dans la zone afin d’améliorer notre interopérabilité et d’être en mesure d’effectuer des missions opérationnelles conjointes ou en coalition.

Passex franco-américaine pour le « Cassard »
Passex franco-américaine pour le « Cassard »
Passex franco-américaine pour le « Cassard »

Partager cet article

Repost0
10 avril 2015 5 10 /04 /avril /2015 11:20
L’USNS « Rainier », vu depuis la « Meuse » - photo Marine Nationale

L’USNS « Rainier », vu depuis la « Meuse » - photo Marine Nationale

 

5 avril 2015 par PR Meuse

 

Jeudi dernier, les marines françaises et américaines ont démontré une nouvelle fois que l’interopérabilité était une des clés du succès des armées.

 

Pour remplir ses soutes de carburéacteur F44 (un combustible spécialement destiné aux avions de chasses tels que les Rafales et les Super-Étendards Modernisés du porte-avions « Charles de Gaulle »), la « Meuse » fait habituellement étape au gigantesque terminal pétrolier de Jebel Ali (Émirats Arabes Unis, voir l’article JAFZA by night sur le journal de bord en ligne).

 

Quelques heures seulement avant l’arrivée à Jebel Ali, de forts vents de terre ont réduit à néant nos espoirs de s’approvisionner à temps en F44. La visibilité quasi-nulle à cause de la poussière de sable et l’état de la mer rendant risquée toute tentative d’accostage. L’état-major du CTF 53 a trouvé une solution simple et pratique. Nous avons fait route vers le Nord-Ouest, afin de rejoindre l’USNS « Rainier », un pétrolier-ravitailleur américain dont les soutes sont pleines de F44.

 

C’est la conséquence utile de l’intégration de la « Meuse » à la Task Force 53 : pour assurer la continuité du soutien logistique, l’US Navy peut nous fournir directement du carburéacteur.

 

Réactivité, adaptabilité, interopérabilité : moins de 24 heures après la déconvenue météorologique, nous sommes prêts à nous présenter sur le travers bâbord de l’américain. L’exercice est délicat, car différent de celui que nous connaissons bien. Aujourd’hui, nous sommes le ravitaillé. Les conditions de mer sont acceptables mais exigent de faire attention. Notre présentation est prudente, le ravitaillement se passe bien.

L’américain, qui dispose de capacités de pompage supérieures aux nôtres, parvient à établir un débit de 800 m3/heure, soit plus de 220 litres par seconde ! Dès le début du transfert, il faut procéder aux contrôles de qualité qui permettront de garantir le produit délivré au porte-avions.

 

Pour une fois, c’est la « Meuse » qui appose sa marque sur le probe d’un ravitailleur

Pour une fois, c’est la « Meuse » qui appose sa marque sur le probe d’un ravitailleur

 

Quand vient l’heure de se séparer, les marins procèdent aux traditionnels échanges de casquettes et de porte-clés à l’effigie des bâtiments, ainsi qu’à l’incontournable pose de l’autocollant du ravitaillé sur le probe du ravitailleur.

 

Le bilan de la journée est excellent : en quelques heures, la « Meuse » s’est approvisionnée en carburéacteur, rattrapant ainsi le soutage annulé de Djebel Ali. La coopération avec la marine américaine a permis de pallier les déconvenues d’une tempête de sable. L’expérience est un succès, elle sera peut-être reconduite.

Partager cet article

Repost0
2 avril 2015 4 02 /04 /avril /2015 16:20
USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) - photo US Navy

USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) - photo US Navy

 

Apr 1, 2015 ASDNews Source : US Navy

 

The joint high speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) completed acceptance trials at the Austal USA shipyard March 13, the Navy announced March 24. The week-long trials were held in the Gulf of Mexico and overseen by the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). INSURV worked alongside the shipyard to demonstrate the ship's equipment and system operation to ensure it is ready for delivery and fulfills all contractual requirements.

 

Read more

Partager cet article

Repost0
2 avril 2015 4 02 /04 /avril /2015 11:20
USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) - phot US Navy

USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) - phot US Navy

 

BATH, Maine, April 1, 2015 /PRNewswire/

 

The U.S. Navy has awarded funding for the construction of DDG 122, the Fiscal Year 2015 Arleigh Burke-class destroyer under contract at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. This $610.4 million contract modification fully funds this ship which was awarded in 2013 as part of a multi-ship competition for DDG 51 class destroyers. The total value of the five-ship contract is approximately $3.4 billion. General Dynamics Bath Iron Works is a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

Fred Harris, president of Bath Iron Works, said, "This announcement allows us to continue efforts associated with planning and construction of DDG 122. We appreciate the leadership of Senators Collins and King and the strong support of our entire delegation in matters of national defense. We are grateful for their recognition of the contributions made by the people of BIW to the U.S. Navy's important shipbuilding programs."

There are currently three DDG 51 destroyers in production at Bath Iron Works, Rafael Peralta (DDG 115), Thomas Hudner (DDG 116) and Daniel Inouye (DDG 118). The shipyard began fabrication on DDG 115 in November 2011, and delivery to the Navy is scheduled for 2016. Fabrication on DDG 116 began in November 2012, and that ship is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy in 2017. Fabrication has just begun on DDG 118, the first ship of the 2013 multi-ship award.

Bath Iron Works is also building the three ships in the planned three-vessel Zumwalt-class of destroyers, Zumwalt (DDG 1000), Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) and Lyndon Johnson (DDG 1002).

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is a multi-mission combatant that offers defense against a wide range of threats, including ballistic missiles. It operates in support of carrier battle groups, surface action groups, amphibious groups and replenishment groups, providing a complete array of anti-submarine (ASW), anti-air (AAW) and anti-surface (ASUW) capabilities. Designed for survivability, the ships incorporate all-steel construction and have gas turbine propulsion. The combination of the ships' AEGIS combat system, the Vertical Launching System, an advanced ASW system, two embarked SH-60 helicopters, advanced anti-aircraft missiles and Tomahawk anti-ship and land-attack missiles make the Arleigh Burke class the most powerful surface combatant ever put to sea.

 

Bath Iron Works currently employs roughly 5,600 people.

More information about General Dynamics Bath Iron Works can be found at www.gdbiw.com.

More information about General Dynamics is available at www.gd.com.

Partager cet article

Repost0
2 avril 2015 4 02 /04 /avril /2015 07:30
Navy airstrike against Daesh staging area near Mosul, Iraq, March 26

 

1 avr. 2015 US Navy

 

The strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the ISIL terrorist group and the threat they pose to Iraq, Syria, the region, and the wider international community. The destruction of ISIL targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the terrorist group's ability to project terror and conduct operations. Coalition nations which have conducted airstrikes in Iraq include Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Jordan, Netherlands, United Kingdom and U.S. Coalition nations which have conducted airstrikes in Syria include Bahrain, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and the U.S.

Partager cet article

Repost0
1 avril 2015 3 01 /04 /avril /2015 16:55
photo Marine Nationale

photo Marine Nationale

 

1 Avril 2015 Source : Marine nationale

 

À l’occasion du passage du groupe aéronaval américain articulé autour du porte-avions Théodore Roosevelt, les Rafale de la flottille 12F et les F18 américains ont réalisés des vols d’entraînement conjoint.

 

Samedi 28 mars au matin, les pilotes et les techniciens des  deux pays s’activent sur la base de Landivisiau et sur le porte-avions Roosevelt. Des manœuvres se préparent au large de Ouessant. Les moteurs rugissent, prêts au combat simulé.

 

Deux Rafale Marine décollent de la base pour rejoindre deux F18 catapultés du porte-avions américain dans une zone prévue pour un entraînement au combat aérien.

 

L’après-midi, l’entraînement s’intensifie,  quatre Rafale décollent pour un exercice tactique contre quatre F18.

 

Ces manœuvres s’inscrivent dans le cadre de la coopération franco-américaine. Depuis de très nombreuses années, une amitié particulière lie l’aéronautique navale française et américaine.

Partager cet article

Repost0
1 avril 2015 3 01 /04 /avril /2015 11:30
photo EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

 

01/04/2015 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Le 22 mars a débuté l’exercice Artémis Trident 15, au large de Bahreïn dans le golfe arabo-persique, conduit par le groupe de guerre des mines, en coopération avec les armées britannique et américaines.

 

Cet exercice, d’une durée de 15 jours, a pour objectif de développer l’interopérabilité entre le groupe de guerre des mines en déploiement dans le golfe arabo-persique, et les unités de guerre des mines britanniques et américaines stationnées dans cette zone.

 

Le scénario de cet exercice porte sur un pays soupçonné de miner certaines routes de navigation afin d’avoir plus de poids lors de négociations internationales, créant ainsi un fond de tensions diplomatiques. Pour permettre de rétablir les flux, notamment commerciaux, une coalition composée de la France, des Etats-Unis et de la Grande-Bretagne doit alors engager quatre Task Groups. Le premier comprend des hélicoptères Sea Dragons stationnés à Bahreïn et remorquant des dragues et des sonars. Le second est composé de chasseurs de mines anglais, américains et du navire chasseur des mines Aigle. Le troisième groupe correspond quant à lui aux plongeurs démineurs britanniques et américains mettant en œuvre des drones. Enfin, le quatrième Task Group comprend des chasseurs de mines anglais et américains en plus du navire chasseur de mine Andromède.  L’ensemble de la force est protégé par la frégate britannique Dauntless et un patrouilleur américain.

 

L’exercice Artémis Trident est une occasion remarquable d’entrainement à la guerre des mines dans le golfe arabo-persique. En effet, il permet de mettre en œuvre un panel complet de moyens de guerre des mines : hélicoptères, drones, plongeurs-démineurs, chasseurs de mines, dragueurs. Il constitue également aussi un entrainement réaliste de protection avec une frégate britannique et un patrouilleur américain.

 

Depuis fin janvier et jusqu’au mois de juin 2015, un groupe de guerre des mines composé d’un état-major, d’un détachement du groupe des plongeurs démineurs de l’Atlantique et des chasseurs de mines tripartites L’aigle et Andromède, est déployé dans le golfe arabo-persique. Ses missions sont d’approfondir notre connaissance de cette zone stratégique, d’assurer la sécurité de la navigation vis-à-vis de la menace mines, d’effectuer des actions de coopération avec les marines partenaires présentes dans le Golfe et d’approfondir notre interopérabilité avec les forces britanniques et américaines.

photo EMA / Marine Nationalephoto EMA / Marine Nationale

photo EMA / Marine Nationale

Partager cet article

Repost0
27 mars 2015 5 27 /03 /mars /2015 08:20
Flight Ready: F/A-18 Center Barrel Replacement



26 mars 2015 NAVAIRSYSCOM

 

What does it take to nearly double the service life of a Navy aircraft? Engineers and technicians at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast in Jacksonville, Fla., perform a complete overhaul of the aging F/A-18 Hornet to get these fighters fit for the fleet and back on the flight line.

Partager cet article

Repost0
25 mars 2015 3 25 /03 /mars /2015 08:20
MK 38 25mm gun live fire exercise



24 mars 2015 US Navy

 

PACIFIC OCEAN (March 17, 2014) Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) fire an MK 38 25mm gun during a live fire exercise. The MK-38 is a 25-mm machine gun installed for ship self-defense to counter High Speed Maneuvering Surface Targets (HSMST). It was first employed aboard combatant and auxiliary ships conducting Mid-East Force escort operations and during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. MK 38 Mod 1s are maintained in a rotatable pool for temporary installation aboard deployed ships. Following the October 2000 attack on USS Cole (DDG 67), Task Force Hip Pocket identified an improved MK 38 Machine Gun System (MGS) as a means to increase shipboard self defense against small boat threats. In 2003, the Chief of Naval Operations documented the requirement and directed the development and fielding of the MK 38 Mod 2. Installed aboard CG, DDG, FFG, LSD, LPD, LHD, LHA, LCC, PC, OSV, and USCG FRC class ships and planned for installation aboard CVN, AS, and MK VI class ships, the MK 38 Mod 2 MGS is a low cost, stabilized self defense weapon system that dramatically improves ships' self-defense capabilities. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Patrick Dionne/Released)

Partager cet article

Repost0
24 mars 2015 2 24 /03 /mars /2015 13:50
USS Theodore Roosevelt on visit to the UK - photo Sky News

USS Theodore Roosevelt on visit to the UK - photo Sky News



24 mars 2015 Royal Navy

 

As images of US-UK partnership working goes they don’t come much stronger than this – the USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Stokes Bay near Gosport.

The 100,000 tonne ship and her escort – the destroyer Winston S Churchill – will be in Portsmouth waters until the end of the week as the carrier’s first port of call on her global deployment.

With a 4.5 acre flight deck that can launch aircraft every 30 seconds the USS Theodore Roosevelt has a crew of 5,000 sailors, many of which were keen to offer advice to Royal Navy sailors for when they join the UK’s new aircraft carriers – HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales.

Lt Courtney Callaghan said: “I am really excited about the news that the Royal Navy will get two new aircraft carriers. There is nothing like serving on a carrier – it is a completely different environment to other ships. My top tip would be to really learn about your department, learn who is in your department and how it integrates with the others on the ship. It is a huge space to learn your way around so they need to take their time and just enjoy it.”

Partager cet article

Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories