Overblog
Suivre ce blog Administration + Créer mon blog
12 novembre 2015 4 12 /11 /novembre /2015 08:45
 HSI32 interceptor photo CMN

HSI32 interceptor photo CMN

 

10 November 2015 by defenceWeb

 

A group of Mozambican sailors has completed training on the new HSI32 interceptors the country is receiving from France.

 

French shipyard Constructions Mecaniques de Normandie (CMN), which is building the vessels at its facilities in Cherbourg, completed the training of 34 Mozambican sailors on Friday, after six weeks of theoretical and practical training.

 

Over the course of two weeks, the sailors made a dozen voyages, with the final trips being under complete Mozambican crew control. After their training, the Mozambican soldiers were awarded diplomas at a ceremony, Mer et Marine reports.

 

With the completion of personnel training, the first three HSI32 vessels will be delivered to Mozambique by early next year. They will be transported to Africa via a cargo ship. Deliveries are expected to begin in December.

 

On September 5, 2013, the Mozambican government signed a 200 million euro deal with CMN to build the three Ocean Eagle 43s, three HSI32 interceptors and 24 fishing vessels over a two year period. In January Mozambique ordered another three interceptors, which will be delivered from December 2015 at a rate of one every two months. The first Ocean Eagle was launched on January 22 this year and the first HSI32 was launched at CMN’s facility in Cherbourg on 18 March.

 

The HSI 32s have a length of 32.2 metres and a width of 6.4 metres. Crew complement is 12. The type is made from aluminium for light weight and agility. Sensor options can include a surveillance radar, electro-optical sensors and a satellite link for transferring images and other data.

 

The HSI32 interceptors are able to reach speeds of up to 43 knots and can undertake patrols for three days, with a range of 800 nautical miles at 12 knots or 580 nautical miles at 33 knots. Weapon options include a remotely operated 20 mm cannon and two 12.7 mm machineguns. A 4.8 metre RHIB can be launched from the back of the boat. Crew complement is 12. These vessels are ideal for anti-piracy, anti-terrorism and anti-smuggling missions.

 

The Ocean Eagle 43 patrol vessel features an innovative trimaran design ideal for shallow waters. The model has a top speed of 30 knots and a range of 3 000 miles at 20 knots or 5 000 miles at 12 knots. Crew complement is seven, but another eight people can be accommodated aboard. A small helipad can accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) like the Schiebel Camcopter while a seven metre rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) can be launched from a ramp at the back of the vessel. Weapons options include a 20 or 30 mm cannon above the bridge and two 12.7 mm machineguns at the stern.

 

The new vessels ordered from France will provide a major boost to Mozambique’s navy, especially in light of recent offshore oil and natural gas finds. At present the country’s small navy comprises a single Conejera class patrol craft (Pebane) donated by Spain, a couple of Namacurra class harbour patrol boats donated by South Africa and around ten small patrol craft, including RHIBs.

Partager cet article

Repost0
20 mars 2015 5 20 /03 /mars /2015 08:45
C-47TP maritime patrol aircraft

C-47TP maritime patrol aircraft

 

19 March 2015 by Kim Helfrich – defenceWeb

 

The decrease in pirate activity off Africa’s east coast has probably contributed to an SA National Defence Force (SANDF) Joint Operations decision to withdraw air operations from Pemba in support of the anti-piracy Operation Copper.

 

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) counter-piracy tasking is now in its fifth year of operation with South Africa as the major contributor of both personnel and equipment. Mozambique and Tanzania are the other two SADC nations who have committed to the operation in the Mozambique Channel since its inception in 2011.

 

The first Operation Copper deployment was early in 2011 following the hijacking of a Mozambican fishing vessel by Somali pirates in the northern reaches of the Mozambique Channel. Lindiwe Sisulu, at the time Defence and Military Veterans Minister, said South African warships were deployed to northern Mozambique along with a C-47TP maritime patrol aircraft from 35 Squadron and a 22 Squadron Super Lynx maritime helicopter. This hardware was supported by a total of 377 uniformed personnel from the air force, military health services and the navy.

 

Captain (SAN) Jaco Theunissen, Joint Operations spokesman, confirmed this week that Pemba and hence 35 Squadron would no longer be a part of Operation Copper.

 

“Maritime operations will continue from an SA Navy platform,” he said, declining to answer questions on whether the SAAF would still be part of Op Copper.

 

At present the offshore patrol vessel (OPV) SAS Galeshewe is on station in the Mozambique Channel having replaced one of her sister ships, SAS Isaac Dyobha.

 

At various times since the deployment started the Navy has put Valour Class frigates and the supply ship SAS Drakensberg into the seas off the lower east African coast as a piracy deterrent. More recently this task has been the exclusive preserve of the serving OPVs, all converted Warrior Class strikecraft.

 

The normal OPV crew requirement for an Operation Copper deployment is around the 60 mark including a Maritime Reaction Squadron component, divers, an ops medic and two Mozambican sea riders.

 

The only South African platform to have been an active part of a counter-piracy operation was Drakensberg. She acted as southern stopper for the EU Naval Force to prevent a suspected pirate ship from escaping the multi-national task force based off the Horn of Africa.

 

It is not known at present if the term of Operation Copper will be extended. It was last extended for 12 months by President Jacob Zuma, in his capacity as SANDF Commander-in-Chief, until the end of March this year.

Partager cet article

Repost0
11 septembre 2014 4 11 /09 /septembre /2014 16:45
First Mozambican patrol boat hull delivered

 

11 September 2014 by defenceWeb

 

The first of three hulls for Mozambique’s new Ocean Eagle 43 patrol boats is on its way to the CMN shipyard in France, where it will be motorised and equipped. Mozambique has three patrol boats, three interceptors and 24 fishing trawlers on order from the French company.

 

CMN Shipyards on Tuesday announced that the first hull left the H2X Shipyard workshops on September 8 and was due to depart La Ciotat, France, on September 12 to reach Cherbourg aboard the cargo vessel Spirit. CMN will then complete the vessel.

 

The other two hulls are already under construction. One will be removed from its mould during the week for a delivery in mid-November and the third is scheduled for mid-January 2015, CMN said.

 

The Ocean Eagle 43 patrol vessel features an innovative trimaran design ideal for shallow waters. The model has a top speed of 30 knots and a range of 3 000 miles at 20 knots. Crew complement is seven, but another eight people can be accommodated aboard. A small helipad can accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) like the Schiebel Camcopter while a seven metre rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) can be launched from a ramp at the back of the vessel. Weapons options include a 20 or 30 mm cannon above the bridge and two 12.7 mm machineguns at the stern.

 

On September 5, 2013, the Mozambican government signed a 200 million euro deal with Constructions Mecaniques de Normandie (CMN) to build the three Ocean Eagles, three HSI 32 interceptors and 24 fishing vessels over a two year period.

 

The HSI 32 interceptors are able to reach speeds of up to 45 knots and can undertake patrols for three days, with a range of 800 miles. Weapon options include a remotely operated 20 mm cannon and two 12.7 mm machineguns. A RHIB can be launched from the back of the boat. Crew complement is 12. These vessels are ideal for anti-piracy, anti-terrorism and anti-smuggling missions.

 

The order for 24 trawlers involves the CMN 23.5 model, crewed by eight and having an endurance of ten days. Deliveries should take place by 2016.

 

The new vessels ordered from France will provide a major boost to Mozambique’s small navy, especially in light of recent offshore oil and natural gas finds. At present the country’s small navy comprises a single Conejera class patrol craft (Pebane) donated by Spain, a couple of Namacurra class harbour patrol boats donated by South Africa and around ten small patrol craft, including RHIBs.

 

The order was well timed for CMN, which was struggling with a small order book and was about to lay off staff. It was the biggest contract in the company’s history.

 

Mozambique is paying for the vessels with money from loans from Credit Suisse and VTB Capital, Bloomberg reports. Last year Mozambique set up Empresa Mocambicana de Atum SA, or Mozambican Tuna Co., (Ematum), which secured a $500 million loan from Credit Suisse and $350 million from VTB Capital. Ematum is 34% owned by the Institute for the Management of State Holdings (IGEPE). The other shareholders are the state fishing company Emopesca and GIPS (Management of Investments, Holdings and Services), with 33% each. GIPS was set up in December 2011, and its main shareholder is the social services of the State Intelligence and Security Service (SISE)

Partager cet article

Repost0
9 juillet 2014 3 09 /07 /juillet /2014 07:45
Aerostar Completes Overhaul and Upgrade of Mozambique AF MiG-21 Fighters

 

Jul 8, 2014 ASDNews Source : Aerostar S.A.

 

Aerostar S.A – the leading Romanian aerospace company – has announced the completion of an overhaul and upgrade programme for eight MiG-21 fighters for the Mozambique Air Force.

 

The contract under which this work was carried out was a complex package which also included the overhaul of an L-39 jet trainer and a full training programme for ground staff and pilots.

 

Read more

Partager cet article

Repost0
7 avril 2014 1 07 /04 /avril /2014 19:45
Mozambican MiGs stuck in Germany

 

 

07 April 2014 by defenceWeb

 

Three MiG-21 fighter jets destined for Mozambique are stuck in Germany due to a lack of necessary permits. They are part of a batch of eight being shipped from Romania.

 

Romanian company Aerostar is overhauling six MiG-21bis and two MiG-21UM trainer aircraft for the Mozambique Air Force and is also providing training for Mozambican MiG-21 pilots. Three MiG-21s were seen flying at Aerostar’s Bacau facility last year.

 

On Sunday Germany’s Der Spiegel reported that three MiG-21s were transported from the Romanian capital Bucharest by train in six containers and were to have been subsequently shipped to Mozambique from the Germany port of Bremerhaven.

 

However, although the aircraft were declared according to procedure, their transport was done without the necessary permits and they were stopped. Der Spiegel reported that Germany’s public prosecutor will investigate the possible breach of arms control laws. The publication noted that Aerostar was found guilty of a similar incident in 2008.

 

In 2012 German customs officials confiscated MiG-29 engines for Algeria and Tu-142 engines for India over the lack of necessary permits.

 

The Mozambique Air Force is slowly rejuvenating, considering that until recently it was almost entirely inoperable, suffering poor serviceability since independence from Portugal in 1975 and the collapse of the Soviet Union and its financial support in the early 1990s. The arrival of the MiG-21s will give the Air Force a jet capability not had in years, as its existing MiG-21s have fallen into disrepair and are grounded.

 

In addition to the MiG-21s, Mozambique has apparently bought two Aerostar Festival side-by-side light aircraft and will get an overhauled Aero Vodochody L-39ZO jet trainer. Late last year it emerged that Mozambique’s Air Force would also receive two second hand Antonov An-26B transport aircraft after they have been refurbished in the Ukraine.

Partager cet article

Repost0
24 mars 2014 1 24 /03 /mars /2014 17:45
Operation Copper now only with SA and Mozambique

 

20 March 2014 by Guy Martin - defenceWeb

 

Operation Copper, the mission to provide maritime security and prevent piracy in the Mozambique Channel, is now a bilateral operation between South Africa and Mozambique after Tanzania withdrew.

 

According to Lieutenant Colonel Piet Paxton of the SANDF's Joint Operations Division, Tanzania withdrew from the operation some 18 months ago.

 

During the height of piracy in 2011, Somali pirates ventured far south and began attacking vessels in the waters between Africa and Madagascar. In December 2010 two vessels were attacked off Mozambique and a Mozambique-flagged fishing vessel was hijacked.

These incidents prompted South Africa in 2011 to establish Operation Copper to patrol the Mozambique Channel and in early 2012 sign a memorandum of understanding with Southern African Development community (SADC) members Mozambique and Tanzania to maintain the anti-piracy watch and. Since then, frigates, offshore patrol vessels and maritime surveillance aircraft have been deployed to Mozambican waters.

 

The Navy frigate SAS Spioenkop with a Super Lynx helicopter is currently on station in the Mozambique Channel while a C-47TP maritime surveillance aircraft is based in Pemba. At the moment there are around 220 SANDF personnel on land and at sea as part of Copper, with the majority aboard the frigate. The frigate will be rotated sometime next month as it is due to depart for Simons Town on March 31.

 

Mozambique’s contribution to Operation Copper includes personnel stationed on the frigates or strike craft – usually a dozen personnel on the frigate and less than half a dozen aboard the strike craft.

 

Paxton said that Operation Copper has been very successful with no piracy incidents in the last three years that the South African Navy has been patrolling the region. If pirates get their foot in the door, then the busy Cape sea lane will be threatened. He said that South Africa will continue with Copper, until president and commander-in-chief Jacob Zuma decides that it is time to withdraw.

 

Speaking to the media in February, defence minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula said the reduction in piracy, “is as a result of our presence in the Mozambique Channel. Now they know they can’t go down that far,” she said. “The presence of the SANDF serves as a deterrent…if we go, the pirates may come back.”

 

SA Navy Fleet media liaison officer, Commander Adrian Dutton, said all four frigates – SAS Amatola, SAs Isandlwana, SAS Mendi and SAS Spioenkop – as well as the Navy’s replenishment vessel, SAS Drakensberg, and two of it its offshore patrol vessels (OPVs), SAS Galeshewe and SAS Isaac Dyobha, have done time on station in the Mozambique Channel.

 

These platforms have been supported by elements of the SA Air Force, notably a 35 Squadron C-47TP based at Pemba in Mozambique, as well as Oryx helicopters from the Durban, Hoedspruit and Zwartkop air force bases.

 

Drakensberg is the only SA Navy vessel to have been involved in a pirate incident when she was requested to take up a stopper position by the European Union Naval Force to prevent a suspected pirate ship from escaping EU pursuit in April 2012.

 

For the 2013/14 period, some R585 million was allocated for anti-piracy operations as part of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Maritime Security Strategy. Operation Copper cost R150 million in 2011 and 2012, according to a written parliamentary reply.

 

Note: After this story was published, Joy Peter, the defence minister's spokesperson, said the agreement between Mozambique, Tanzania and South Africa was still in place.

Partager cet article

Repost0
12 novembre 2013 2 12 /11 /novembre /2013 12:45
Antonov An-26

Antonov An-26

 

07 November 2013 by Guy Martin – defenceWeb

 

The Mozambique Air Force will soon receive two second hand Antonov An-26B transport aircraft, which are currently being refurbished in the Ukraine.

 

The An-26B-100s have been worked on for the last few months at Kiev-Zhuliany in the Ukraine, according to Air Forces Daily. One was seen in July painted in Force Aerea de Mocambique colours while a second was seen test flying in late July. It is not clear exactly how many An-26s are destined for the Mozambique Air Force or when exactly they will be delivered.

 

It is not clear from where the aircraft originated, but it is certain that they are not ex-Mozambican examples, as these are unserviceable. Six derelict An-26s are in open storage at Maputo, two are at Beira and one at Cuamba, reports Air Forces Daily. Mozambique’s Air Force received around ten An-26s from 1978. One crashed on March 30, 1986, whilst trying to land at Pemba Airport, killing 3 crew and 41 of 46 passengers on board.

 

Reports of the An-26 acquisition are the latest to emerge regarding the modernisation of the Mozambique Air Force, which until recently almost ceased to exist. Earlier this month it was reported that the country will soon receive eight MiG-21s (six Mig-21Bis and two MiG-21UM trainers) from Romanian company Aerostar once their overhaul is complete, together with an L-39 jet trainer and two Festival light aircraft.

 

The arrival of the MiG-21s will give the Air Force a jet capability not had in years, as its MiG-21s have fallen into disrepair and are grounded.

 

Another recent acquisition occurred in September when the Air Force took delivery of a second hand Hawker 850XP business jet, built in 2005.

Partager cet article

Repost0
15 septembre 2013 7 15 /09 /septembre /2013 21:45
FAZSOI : Exercice Oxide 2013

13/09/2013 Sources : EMA

 

Du 30 août au 6 septembre 2013, les forces armées en zone sud de l’océan Indien (FAZSOI) ont participé au Mozambique à l’exercice naval Oxide 2013.

 

Organisée au large de Maputo, la troisième édition de cet exercice (les précédentes ont eu lieu en 2008 et 2011) rassemblait les marines française, sud-africaine et mozambicaine. La frégate de surveillance Nivôse et de son hélicoptère Panther (qui appartient aux FAZSOI) ont été engagés aux côtés de la frégate sud-africaine « Isandlwana » et son Super-Lynx, de la corvette lance-missile « Isaac Dyobha », du sous-marin « Queen Modjaji », d’un C130 Hercule, d’un C47 Dakota et d’une équipe de sauvetage aéroportée. Les forces armées mozambicaines ont elles aussi été associées à l’événement par l’intégration d’officiers au sein de l’équipage du « Nivôse » et de l’état-major embarqué sur l’Isandlwana.

 

Les trois premières journées  passées en commun ont été consacrées à la préparation des exercices. La présence à quai a permis d’enchainer démonstrations dans les domaines de la sécurité et de la protection/défense et tables rondes visant à affiner la cinématique des exercices à la mer et des activités de cohésion (séances de sport collectives, échanges dans les carrés). Les équipages ont ainsi appris à mieux se connaître avant de prendre la mer.

 

Dans les jours qui ont suivi, les exercices se sont succédés à un rythme soutenu : remorquages, exercices de visite, treuillages croisés, recherche et interception de navires suspectés de divers trafics ou en pêche illicite. Cette coopération s’est étendue aux « Maritime rescue coordination center (MRCC) » de Pretoria, et au Centre régional opérationnel de surveillance et de sauvetage (CROSS) de la Réunion au travers d’un scénario de sauvetage d’un sous-marin qui s’est clôturé par un parachutage de forces spécialisées dans le domaine.

 

L’exercice Oxide 2013 a tout d’abord offert aux différentes marines la possibilité de valider leurs procédures d’interopérabilité. Il a également fourni une occasion privilégiée d'échanges entre militaires de trois pays riverains, partageant les mêmes préoccupations face aux menaces dans la zone. Cet exercice a aussi donné l’opportunité au général de division Jean François Hogard, commandant supérieur des FAZSOI de prendre contact avec les autorités civiles (ministre de la défense) et militaires (chef d'état-major des armées) mozambicaines et de renouveler les offres de coopération militaire de la France.

 

Les FAZSOI ont pour mission de protéger le territoire national, les installations stratégiques et contribuer au maintien de la sécurité ; d’assurer la prévention et la préservation des intérêts de la France dans la zone de responsabilité contre toute forme d’agression extérieure ; de soutenir l’action de l’Etat et contribuer aux conditions de stabilité et de développement des collectivités territoriales par la mise en œuvre de moyens militaires ;  d’affirmer la souveraineté française. En cas de crise, elles sont en mesure de conduire ou participer à une opération militaire et/ou de mener des opérations de secours d’urgence (assistance humanitaire, catastrophes naturelles).

FAZSOI : Exercice Oxide 2013FAZSOI : Exercice Oxide 2013
FAZSOI : Exercice Oxide 2013FAZSOI : Exercice Oxide 2013

Partager cet article

Repost0
10 septembre 2013 2 10 /09 /septembre /2013 18:45
Mozambique signs patrol, interceptor vessel contract with CMN

10 September 2013 by defenceWeb

 

The Mozambican government has signed a $200 million deal with French shipyard CMN to build three patrol vessels, three fast interceptors and 24 fishing trawlers. The contract represents a major boost to Mozambique’s small Navy.

 

Constructions Mecaniques de Normandie (CMN) will spend two years building the vessels, which include three 32 metre and three 42 metre patrol vessels, according to MCN owner Iskandar Safa, who announced the deal at a press conference on Thursday.

 

The contract covers three Ocean Eagle 43 patrol vessels, featuring an innovative trimaran design ideal for shallow waters. The model has a top speed of 30 knots and a range of 3 000 miles at 20 knots. Crew complement is seven, but another eight people can be accommodated aboard. A small helipad can accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) like the Schiebel Camcopter while a seven metre rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) can be launched from a ramp at the back of the vessel. Weapons options include a 20 or 30 mm cannon above the bridge and two 12.7 mm machineguns at the stern.

 

The HSI 32 interceptors are able to reach speeds of up to 45 knots and can undertake patrols for three days, with a range of 800 miles. Weapon options include a remotely operated 20 mm cannon and two 12.7 mm machineguns. A RHIB can be launched from the back of the boat. Crew complement is 12. These vessels are ideal for anti-piracy, anti-terrorism and anti-smuggling missions.

 

The order for 24 trawlers involves the CMN 23.5 model, crewed by eight and having an endurance of ten days. Deliveries should take place by 2016.

 

The new vessels ordered from France will provide a major boost to Mozambique’s small navy, especially in light of recent offshore oil and natural gas finds. At present the country’s small navy comprises a single Conejera class patrol craft (Pebane) donated by Spain, a couple of Namacurra class harbour patrol boats donated by South Africa and around ten small patrol craft, including RHIBs

Partager cet article

Repost0
6 septembre 2013 5 06 /09 /septembre /2013 06:55
Commmande de 200 M EUR pour les chantiers cherbourgeois CMN (direction)

CHERBOURG (France), 05 sept 2013 marine-oceans.com  (AFP)

 

Le Mozambique a passé une commande de 30 bateaux d'une valeur de 200 millions d'euros aux Constructions mécaniques de Normandie (CMN), qui emploie près de 350 personnes à Cherbourg, a annoncé jeudi le propriétaire des chantiers navals, l'homme d'affaires libanais Iskandar Safa.

 

Il s'agit de 24 chalutiers, trois patrouilleurs de 32 mètres et trois patrouilleurs de 42 m, a-t-il précisé lors d'une conférence de presse à Cherbourg en présence du ministre du Redressement Productif Arnaud Montebourg, du ministre délégué au Budget et ancien député-maire de Cherbourg Bernard Cazeneuve et de la ministre du Commerce extérieur Nicole Bricq.

 

Le ministre de l'Economie de Mozambique Manuel Chang était également présent.

 

Cela représente plus de deux ans de plan de charge pour les CMN, selon la direction.

 

"Pour les CMN, il était temps que ce contrat arrive. Les chantiers deviennent ainsi les premiers constructeurs de chalutiers en France", a déclaré Bernard cazeneuve.

 

"C'est le triomphe du made in Cherbourg et donc du made in France", a ajouté Arnaud Montebourg.

 

"C'est une partie d'un contrat que le groupe Safa a signé avec le Mozambique", a expliqué M. Safa.

 

L'ensemble de la commande au groupe Safa inclut une trentaine d'autres bateaux pour les autres chantiers du groupe (situés notamment en Allemagne et à Abou Dabi), a précisé M. Safa.

 

Les CMN affichent un chiffre d'affaires annuel d'environ 50 à 100 millions d'euros, selon les années, selon la direction.

Partager cet article

Repost0
28 août 2013 3 28 /08 /août /2013 11:45
African military profile: Mozambique

23 August 2013 by Guy Martin – defenceWeb

 

Since the end of Mozambique’s civil war in 1992, the Armed Forces for the Defence of Mozambique (FADM) have struggled to become a coordinated, cohesive and well-equipped force. Click here to find out more about the FADM.

A limited defence budget has resulted in the majority of the military’s equipment being unserviceable. Such challenges come at a time when Renamo militia are causing instability inside the country.

Partager cet article

Repost0

Présentation

  • : RP Defense
  • : Web review defence industry - Revue du web industrie de défense - company information - news in France, Europe and elsewhere ...
  • Contact

Recherche

Articles Récents

Categories