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6 octobre 2015 2 06 /10 /octobre /2015 16:45
General Rodriguez commander of U.S. Africa Command

General Rodriguez commander of U.S. Africa Command

 

05 October 2015 by Africom - defenceWeb

 

The commander of U.S. Africa Command, U.S. Army Gen. David Rodriguez, finished a weeklong trip to Djibouti, Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda with U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs Amanda Dory Oct. 2. Dory and Rodriguez met with officials in each country to discuss how AFRICOM and the U.S. Department of Defense can continue to help partner nations strengthen their military capacity.  “Defense cooperation is one of our core missions at U.S. Africa Command because we know that partnering with African states and regional organizations to constantly improve their capabilities and knowledge is important in addressing shared security challenges,” Rodriguez said.

 

Legions of Merit for AMISOM Support

Rodriguez also presented the Legion of Merit to six officers from the Uganda People’s Defence Force Sept. 30. The recipients are among less than 200 foreign citizens who’ve received the U.S. award and the first from Uganda. The awards specifically recognized the Ugandan officers for contributing to the African Union Mission in Somalia, known as AMISOM, which is charged with reducing the threat of violent extremist organizations like al-Shabbab. First deployed in March 2007, the AMISOM military component has achieved significant territorial gains against the al-Qaeda-affiliated terror group al-Shabaab.  “Continued support to AMISOM is one of the important multinational efforts in place today. As a result of improved security, the Somali people and government have greater opportunities to make progress in the development of governance and economic institutions,” Rodriguez said. In 2014, the Ugandan People’s Defense Force liberated the port city of Barawe, Somalia, cutting off al-Shabaab’s access to what was a base and source of revenue. The UPDF also foiled a major al-Shabaab terrorist attack in Kampala. In Kenya, Rodriguez and Dory oversaw the formal establishment of the Massachusetts National Guard as the U.S. military partner for Kenya as part of the Defense Department’s State Partnership Program Oct. 1. The State Partnership Program is a coordinated effort between the Defense Department, the Department of State, the National Guard Bureau and the combatant commands where the partnered efforts occur.  “Our shared objective is to build professional militaries that, not only are capable of delivering on security priorities, but also respect human rights and adhere to the rule of law,” Rodriguez said. The partnership between the Massachusetts National Guard and Kenya is one of 12 ongoing state partnerships in Africa.  “AFRICOM recognizes the importance of partnership. A stable Africa ultimately means greater opportunities for collaboration toward shared goals and values that bind all our countries together,” Rodriguez said.

 

Recognizing Partner Efforts

During the trip Rodriguez also discussed how partner militaries in Djibouti, Ethiopia and Somalia support regional security:

Djiboutian training for the Somali National Army has strengthened Somalia’s capacity to defend its government and its people from al-Shabaab. In addition, Djibouti hosts Camp Lemonnier, the sole enduring presence for the U.S. military in Africa.

The Ethiopian National Defense Force contributes troops in support of United Nations peacekeeping forces worldwide, making it the fourth largest contributor globally and the largest in Africa.

With support from the U.S. Department of State and Department of Defense, the Somali Armed Forces continue to make progress in partnership with AMISOM to secure ungoverned space, defeat al-Shabaab, and create the conditions for a peaceful Somalia.

Rodriguez said Africa is home to some of the fastest growing economies in the world, and global leaders are increasingly recognizing the power of Africa’s diversity in people, resources and economies.

 “The link between security and prosperity is undeniable. For this reason, President Obama also identified building defense capacity among African partners as essential to advancing peace and security on the continent. As it works to meet these challenges, Africa is full of opportunity and promise and is becoming a major international player in world security,” Rodriguez added.

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3 octobre 2015 6 03 /10 /octobre /2015 16:45
U.S., Senegal train on sea-to-land tactics

Compagnie Fusilier de Marin Commandos depart after raiding a simulated enemy position during the final exercise with U.S. service members in Dakar, Senegal, Sept. 17, 2015. The Marines and Coast Guardsmen with Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Africa spent four weeks training the COFUMACO on basic infantry tactics and small-boat operations as a part of a Maritime Security Force Assistance mission to increase interoperability with Senegal’s and strengthen the bond between the partner nations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Olivia McDonald/Released)

 

01 October 2015 by Africom - defenceWeb

 

U.S. Marines, Coast Guardsmen and Senegalese Compagnie Fusilier de Marin Commando completed a monthlong security cooperation exercise in Dakar, Sept. 17.

 

U.S. service members with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Africa trained with Senegalese forces focusing on infantry tactics and small boat operations. This is the final “train-the-trainer” iteration of the maritime security force assistance mission in Senegal.

 

The sea-to-land tactics exchanged over the four weeks of training are essential to the Senegalese commandos maintaining stability in the region.

 

“Most of our missions are very much like the training we’ve done," said Senegal 1st Lt. Goumalo Sall, a company commander with the commando unit. “Most of the time they are patrolling in the south Casamance region or throughout the river.”

 

The unit's leaders received training on the Marine Corps planning process to expand upon the French military system for planning that they’re familiar with. Although many of the commandos are experienced, the Marines still brought a lot to the table and helped to refine skills such as field craft and tactical site exploitation on land and formations and communication on small boats.

 

They conducted their final exercise, a beach raid, encompassing all the skills covered over the four weeks the Marines and Coast Guardsmen were in the country. After hitting the beach by boat, the commandos conducted reconnaissance and ambushed an enemy position before extracting via boats in another location.

 

“They were quick, discrete and aggressive,” Sall said. “At the end, they executed their mission just as we expected.”

 

The performance and improvement throughout the training is what makes the partnership with the Marines is so important, added Sall, who has worked with U.S. Marine Corps security cooperation teams since 2012.

 

“The work they did everyday went beyond our expectations,” said Sall. “That’s why we need the training with the Marines.”

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14 septembre 2015 1 14 /09 /septembre /2015 16:45
LOGCAP IV Tent Installation and Construction at Forward Operating Base - photo Fluor Corporation

LOGCAP IV Tent Installation and Construction at Forward Operating Base - photo Fluor Corporation

 

14.09.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

 

La société américaine Fluor Corporation, l'un des trois firmes (avec DynCorp et KBR) retenues dans le cadre du LOGCAP IV (le Logistic Civil Augmentation Program), a annoncé qu'elle avait été choisie pour assurer le soutien des opérations de l'AFRICOM en Afrique, de l'Union africaine et des organisations régionales de sécurité d'Afrique. Lire le communiqué ici.

Fluor assurera le même type de missions au profit du SOUTHCOM (Caraïbes, Amériques centrale et latine).

Au siège de ces deux commandements (Stuttgart pour l'AFRICOM et Miami pour le SOUTHCOM), Fluor va détacher un responsable de la planification.

Pour en savoir plus sur Fluor et son rôle dans les contingency operations, cliquer ici.

Fluor fait aussi partie des huit firmes retenues dans le cadre de l'Air Force Contract Augmentation Program IV (AFCAP IV); ce programme de 6 ans débute le 1er octobre prochain.

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13 mai 2015 3 13 /05 /mai /2015 11:45
photo Owolabi, Olufemi A. SSgt - United States Africa Command

photo Owolabi, Olufemi A. SSgt - United States Africa Command


12.05.2015 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

Le patron de l'Africom a révélé la semaine dernière à Stuggart que les forces rapides d'intervention US en Afrique peuvent compter sur  11 "cooperative security location" (CSL), des tremplins en quelque sorte pour des projections d'urgence.

Le général David Rodriguez n'a pas précisé la liste des pays d'accueil, liste que l'Africom refuse aussi de donner. Toutefois,  des CSL sont implantées au Sénégal, au Ghana, au Gabon, en Ouganda, au Burkina, au Maroc, au Kenya etc.

Selon Rodriguez, ces CSL sont "just an austere site. There’s nothing there but a couple of warehouses full of stuff". De simples entrepôts pleins d'équipements, du genre des stocks RECAMP d'autrefois.

En réalité, outre ces stocks, les CSL doivent disposer des facilités précises définies dans des textes comme l'ACI4300.04.

Ces sites doivent ainsi comprendre des entrepôts (1000 m2), des bureaux (325 m2), des pistes capables d'accueillir, nuit et jour, des C-17, des parkings pour 2 avions-cargos et un autre avion, des soutes pour le carburant (dont du JETA1 pour 3 jours), un accueil pour 200 militaires, des accès à des locations de véhicules. Pour les ports, il faut un quai capable d'accueillir un navire de 289m.

Ces CSL doivent être situées à moins de quatre heures de vol de tous les points chauds du continent.

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24 février 2015 2 24 /02 /février /2015 17:45
Chief of Staff of the Senegalese Army Brigadier General Cheikh Gueye

Chief of Staff of the Senegalese Army Brigadier General Cheikh Gueye

 

20 February 2015 by Africom - defenceWeb

 

It was about advancing friendship, partnership and building trust. That is according to Maj. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, commander, U.S. Army Africa upon the close of the African Land Forces Summit, or ALFS, in Dakar, Senegal.

 

The summit, held from Feb. 9-12, brought together land force commanders from 36 African nations. The summit was co-hosted by U.S. Army Africa and the Senegalese Armed Forces on behalf of Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, U.S. Army Chief of Staff. The last ALFS took place three years prior, in Kampala, Uganda.

 

“This is a beginning. This is a conversation and this narrative is just beginning,” said Williams.

 

Part of that conversation was generated in closed-door meetings between commanders. Speakers from the U.S. and African partner militaries addressed topics such as African security challenges, peace support operations and institutional adaptation during plenary sessions with all the commanders. Commanders then split into three smaller groups, behind closed doors, to discuss the subject at hand.

 

The closed door approach helped leaders to speak freely during the sessions.

 

“ALFS is a good opportunity for USARAF and the African partners to discuss, to exchange, about security and about how to train our units,” said Brig. Gen. Cheikh Gueye, chief of Senegal Army Staff. “It is a good opportunity also to build trust,” he said. “Without trust you can’t achieve anything.”

 

For some of the land force commanders ALFS was an opportunity expand their reach and build relationships beyond what they normally would.

 

“I was already in contact with those from my region, from [Southern African Development Community] region, but today I have met others from other regions,” said Maj. Gen. Gotsileene Morake, chief of land forces Botswana. “From West Africa, from the Horn of Africa and from North Africa, we have been able to share experiences across a broad range of issues, African issues, which are actually very topical today.”

 

African land force commanders also visited a training center near Thies, Senegal. There they observed a live fire range with ground troops assaulting a position, and an armored vehicle range where Senegalese Armed Forces soldiers fired 90 millimeter guns from reconnaissance vehicles. Officers also visited École Nationale Des Officiers d'Active, an officer training school in Thies.

 

During a press conference at the end of the event Williams talked of the importance of ALFS and how that range played into future opportunities. Williams said he will look at taking the best from the U.S. Army training centers, the best from the Senegalese training center and combine them to work together. He said that was a short term benefit to having ALFS.

 

“The real benefits of this conference will be realized over time, again and again,” Williams added.

 

Geuye agreed with that assessment.

 

“Military interoperability is essential in conducting military operations or military missions,” Geuye said. “But if you have most African armies together you cannot develop, but initiate the first step toward interoperability.”

 

While the conference covered training, building institutions and live fire ranges, the real benefit, according to Maj. Gen. Ignacio Maulana, Malawi ground force commander, was working with his fellow commanders.

 

“The most important of all is that understanding, that, I think, we are all looking for peace,” Maulana said. “And, I think, all the ideas we have been able to share as a people responsible for security in our various nations should be able to assist.”

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17 décembre 2014 3 17 /12 /décembre /2014 17:45
Virginian-32 va assurer le soutien de l'exercice Flintlock 15 qui aura lieu au Tchad

 

15.12.2014 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

Le Tchad a annoncé qu'il va accueillir l'exercice Flintlock 2015, une exercice multinational supervisé par l'AFRICOM et qui met en scène des forces spéciales. Flintlock débutera le 16 février à N’Djamena et se prolongera jusqu'au 9 mars. Lire ici un article sur ce sujet.

1 200 soldats venant du Tchad, du Niger, du Nigeria et du Cameroun évolueront ensemble. D'autres soldats et des observateurs viendront des pays suivants: Burkina Faso, Danemark, Canada, France, Allemagne, Italie, Mauritanie, Pays-Bas, Belgique, Suède, Norvège, Sénégal, Espagne, GB, Mali et USA.

Voir la page Facebook de Flintlock ici.

 

Soutien US. Un avis du 11 décembre (Solicitation Number: W56PFY14D00070003), à lire ici, précise que le soutien logistique de l'exercice a été confié à une entreprise américaine: Virginian-32.

Cette petite firme de Floride va assurer le soutien logistique et assurer des prestations dans les domaines de l'énergie, de l'hébergement, de l'assainissement... Montant du contrat: 1,298 million de dollars. Il s'agit du plus contrat que cette PME a obtenu avec le Pentagone.

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14 novembre 2014 5 14 /11 /novembre /2014 12:45
Barkhane : point de situation du 13 novembre 2014

 

13/11/2014 Sources : État-major des armées

 

Point de situation sur les opérations de la force Barkhane, engagée dans la bande sahélo-saharienne (BSS), du 6 au 13 novembre 2014.

 

Dans la BSS la situation a été calme cette semaine malgré des actions de harcèlement des groupes armés terroristes dans le Nord du Mali.

 

Les opérations se poursuivent quotidiennement dans les deux fuseaux.

 

Le 6 novembre, le général de division Palasset, commandant l’opération Barkhane, a reçu le général d’armée américain David Rodriguez, commandant en chef d’AFRICOM. Cette rencontre souligne les excellentes relations entretenues avec nos alliés américains qui apportent une aide aux opérations françaises dans le Sahel, notamment en terme de transport aérien.

 

Dans le Nord du Mali, la force Barkhane a mené du 28 octobre au 6 novembre l’opération Tudelle de lutte contre les terroristes. Cette opération a mobilisé plus de 400 militaires dans des actions de contrôle de zone et de fouilles de caches terroristes. Au bilan, elle a permis la neutralisation de 26 terroristes, dont deux se sont rendus et ont été transférés aux autorités maliennes. Lors de cette opération, six véhicules, des dizaines de roquettes RPG7 et leurs lance-roquette, des dizaines de grenades à main et fusils, ainsi qu’un dépôt logistique ont été découverts.

 

L’opération Barkhane regroupe 3 000 militaires dont la mission, en partenariat avec les pays du G5 Sahel, consiste à lutter contre les groupes armés terroristes dans la bande sahélo-saharienne.

Barkhane : point de situation du 13 novembre 2014
Barkhane : point de situation du 13 novembre 2014

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16 juillet 2014 3 16 /07 /juillet /2014 07:45
Participants in African Endeavour 2013

Participants in African Endeavour 2013

 

15 July 2014 by US Africom

 

The opening ceremony for African Endeavor consisted of a roll call of nations with representatives, one at a time, standing and being recognized with a round of applause.

 

But unlike the previous eight gatherings, this is the first time representatives from the United Nations, United Kingdom, Madagascar and USAID have participated. And it’s the first time in the history of African Endeavor that the exercise has been held somewhere other than Africa; this year gathering in Garmisch, Germany.

 

“I am really looking forward to being able to share our experiences with you, but more importantly, learning from your experiences across all the nations here and how we can better work alongside you in the future,“ said first time participant COL. Craig Sutherland of the British Army.

 

According to organizers, however, the “who” and the “where” isn’t the biggest difference between African Endeavor 2014 (AE14) and all previous exercises. AE14 is heading in a new direction said COL. Patrick Dedham, Director of U.S. Africa Command’s (AFRICOM) Command, Control, Communications and Computer Systems Directorate (J6).

 

“This is about taking it from the tactical and moving it towards the operational and strategic level where AFRICOM should be and working with the components to take over the tactical piece of African Endeavor so that we’re not doing African Endeavor once a year, we’re doing it throughout the year,” said Dedham.

 

Africa Endeavor is an AFRICOM sponsored communications exercise that focuses on information sharing and interoperability between African nations. Since it was first held in 2006, more than 1,700 communication specialists have attended. And with 32 African and European nations here, as well as representatives from the African Union, NATO, and the United Nations, it is easily AFRICOM’s most diverse exercise.

 

“It’s an incredible exercise. It’s a great collection of people that can really make a difference,” said Dedham.

 

Africa Endeavor's primary objective is to increase the command, control and communications capacities of African nations by encouraging interoperable tactics, training and procedures, and creating documented standards that support interoperability. This allows African nations to provide critical support to the African Union and other forces involved in humanitarian assistance, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions.

 

“To be able to speak directly and frankly with one another so that we can improve our communications face-to-face and discuss what the problems, this is one of the best ways for us to respond to a crisis on the continent,” said LTC Khaled Ben Ammar of the Tunisia Armed Forces. “These situations demand a collective response so it’s very important we have this opportunity to meet in person.”

 

Over the course of the four day exercise, representatives will be split into five different regions and face two separate tabletop scenarios that will test their ability to develop a strategic and operation plan in response to a mock crisis.

 

“I hope they walk away with the knowledge of who to call, new relationships through networking, people they can call for help to coordinate and synchronize their efforts. I also want them to walk away with some good techniques, tactics and procedures that they can use at the strategic level to plan for contingency operations,” said Dedham.

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13 juillet 2014 7 13 /07 /juillet /2014 12:45
CEMA : entretien avec le chef du commandement régional américain pour l’Afrique

 

11/07/2014 Sources : EMA

 

Le 8 juillet 2014, le général d’armée Pierre de Villiers, chef d’état-major des armées (CEMA), a reçu le général d’armée David Rodriguez, chef du commandement régional des Etats-Unis pour l’Afrique (US AFRICOM).

 

Cette rencontre s’inscrit dans le cadre du dialogue militaire régulièrement entretenu entre les deux pays. Créé en 2007 et stationné à Stuttgart en Allemagne, l’AFRICOM a pour mission de coordonner les activités militaires des Etats-Unis sur le continent africain.

 

Au cours de leur entretien, le général de Villiers et le général Rodriguez ont fait le point sur la coopération militaire franco-américaine mise en œuvre au Sahel, dans la Corne de l’Afrique et en Afrique centrale. L’état-major américain AFRICOM constitue un partenaire privilégié dans des régions où la France entretient une présence permanente à travers son dispositif de forces prépositionnées et en opération, comme au Sénégal, au Gabon, au Tchad, en République centrafricaine, à Djibouti, en Côte d’Ivoire ou au Mali.

 

Cette coopération opérationnelle régionale s’est en effet renforcée depuis le déclenchement de l’opération Serval. Les Américains apportent notamment à la France un appui en moyens aériens dans les domaines du ravitaillement en vol et du transport tactique et stratégique. De plus, des actions communes appuient la montée en puissance de la mission des Nations unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA).

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4 juillet 2014 5 04 /07 /juillet /2014 11:20
31 sociétés à la journée du Multinational Airlift Consortium Working Group


04.07.2014 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

J'avais annoncé dans un post du 17 juin que l'USTRANSCOM (Transportation Command) et l'AFRICOM organisent les 9 et 10 juillet (à O'Fallon, Illinois) un atelier de mise en place d'un "Multinational Airlift Consortium Working Group". L'avis est à consulter ici.

 

Il s'agit d'étudier la faisabilité d'une externalisation du transport aérien (personnels et fret) au profit des forces armées US mais aussi d'autres agences fédérales, ainsi que des partenaires multinationaux, déployées sur le continent africain.

 
La liste des entreprises participantes, dont de nombreux affréteurs, a été diffusée; la voici:

AAR Corp (USA)
Adagold Aviation Pty, Ltd (Australie)
AIRBUS Defense and Space, Inc (Europe)
American President Lines (USA)
Baer Air, Inc (USA)
Berry Aviation (USA)
Bighorn Airways, Inc (USA)
Bollore Africa Logistics (France)
Chapman Freeborn (GB)
Daher (France)
Diplomat Group, LLC (USA)
East Coast Flight Services (USA)
Erickson, Inc (USA)
Frontier Services Group (Chine, société d'Erik Prince)
Helicopter Transport Services Canada (Canada)
ICS (France)
Kuehne-Nagel (Allemagne)
Lockheed Martin (USA)
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (USA)
Lynden Air Cargo (USA)
Monarch Air Group (USA)
National Air Cargo (USA)
Phoenix Air Group (USA)
Rampart Aviation, LLC (USA)
RS Logistical Solutions, Ltd (Israel)
Safair Operations, Ltd (RSA)
Strategic Aviation (Canada)
Telford Aviation (USA)
TENAX Aerospace (USA)
Vertical De Aviacion (Colombie)
Young Tiger Consultants, LLC (USA)

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4 juillet 2014 5 04 /07 /juillet /2014 07:45
Somalie: combien de soldats américains?

 

4 juillet, 2014 – BBC Afrique

 

 

Les autorités des Etats-Unis ont pour la première fois divulgué des informations sur le nombre total de militaires américains en Somalie.

 

Des fonctionnaires à Washington ont expliqué à l'agence de presse Reuters qu'environ 120 soldats américains sont déployés dans le pays.

L'envoyé spécial de la BBC en Somalie a constaté la présence sur place de militaires américains engagés dans des opérations contre des insurgés d'al Shabab, organisation islamiste liée à al-Qaïda.

 

 

Suite de l'artilce

 

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3 juillet 2014 4 03 /07 /juillet /2014 16:45
Washington reconnaît la présence de militaires US en Somalie (médias)

 

MOSCOU, 3 juillet - RIA Novosti

 

Des conseillers militaires américains opèrent en secret en Somalie depuis 2007, rapportent jeudi les agences occidentales citant des sources au sein de la Maison Blanche.

 

Selon les médias, à l'heure actuelle, environ 120 militaires américains se trouvent en Somalie sans prendre part aux combats. C'est la première fois que des responsables US reconnaissent une présence militaire américaine aussi importante en Somalie depuis la présidence de George W. Bush.

 

Les Etats-Unis ont l'intention d'accroître leur aide militaire à la Somalie pour aider ce pays à combattre l'insurrection islamiste d'Al Chabaab associée à la nébuleuse terroriste internationale Al-Qaïda.

 

Washington envisage également d'accorder plus de fonds à l'Armée nationale somalienne, après avoir coopéré pendant plusieurs années avec la Mission de l'Union africaine en Somalie (AMISOM). Il convient de rappeler que depuis 2007, les Etats-Unis ont débloqué 512 millions de dollars en faveur de l'AMISOM et 171 M USD pour la mise en place d'une armée professionnelle en Somalie.

 

La Somalie est plongée dans le chaos et la guerre civile depuis la chute du président Siad Barre en 1991 et la dislocation du pays qui a suivi. De nos jours, la Somalie n'existe pratiquement plus en tant qu'Etat uni. Le pays est partagé entre différentes factions hostiles, dont le mouvement radical al-Chabaab.

 

Reconnu par la communauté internationale comme l'unique organe de pouvoir légal, le Gouvernement fédéral de transition (GFT) ne contrôle que Mogadiscio et certaines régions environnantes, le reste du pays étant administré par des entités autonomes refusant de se soumettre aux autorités centrales.

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17 juin 2014 2 17 /06 /juin /2014 17:20
L'AFRICOM étudie une solution de transport aérien "low volume, low frequency" en Afrique

 

17.06.2014 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense

L'USTRANSCOM (Transportation Command) et l'AFRICOM organisent les 9 et 10 juillet (à O'Fallon, Illinois) un atelier de mise en place d'un "Multinational Airlift Consortium Working Group". Contacts et "special notice" sont à consulter ici.

Selon l'avis, il s'agit d'étudier la faisabilité d'une externalisation du transport aérien (personnels et fret) au profit des forces armées US (DoD)  mais aussi d'autres agences fédérales (non-DoD) déployées sur le continent africain, ainsi que des partenaires multinationaux.

L'avis précise "low volume": 10-14 passagers et 2000/6000 pounds de fret, et "low frequency": 1/2 fois par semaine.

Le/les prestataires, si l'USTRANSCOM prolonge l'atelier du 9 et 10 juillet, devront fournir des appareils, des équipages et tout l'équipement d'entretien etc.

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12 juin 2014 4 12 /06 /juin /2014 16:45
Senegalese commandos, US marines train together

 

12 June 2014 by Africom

 

The open water was rough, but so were the commandos. The boats were rigid, but so was their desire to complete the training.

 

The Commandos are Senegalese, from the Compagnie de Fusilier Marine Commandos who took part in a six-week long training mission with a group of U.S. Marines in April and May.

 

The course was designed to enable the Senegalese to train their own forces in infantry and amphibious tactics and culminated in Dakar, Senegal, at the end of May.

 

The maritime security, force assistance mission was planned to promote partnership between the United States and Senegal and to enable the host nation to better address security challenges. To accomplish this Marines stationed at Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa’s West Africa desk planned to have the Commandos completely take over the responsibility of instructing their peers by 2014.

 

As part of that long term plan, the Marines spent four weeks in February working with what they call a "cadre" of Senegalese instructors. It was this cadre that took over the training in April with the Marines purely in a supervisory position.

 

The six-week long training regimen spanned three different cities across Senegal to simulate operations across a wide array of terrain.

 

The six week-long training regimen began April 15, with a two-week period of instruction where the Marines and COFUMACO focused on maritime security force assistance, marksmanship exercises, patrolling techniques and small-boat tactics and skills.

 

The second two-week period saw the COFUMACO completely take over the training of a new group of Commandos. The US Marines stepped back and took on an advisory role as the cadre ran their own training pipeline for the next four weeks.

 

That four-week programme focused on the same skills the cadre had previously perfected while training with the Marines.

 

According to Captain Travis Posey, the Marine security co-operation team’s officer-in-charge, the shift to a Senegalese-led training programme was by design and fell in line with Marine Forces Europe and Africa’s and Marine Corps Security Co-operation Group’s long term security co-operation plan for partnering with Senegal.

 

“We knew going into this mission there had been a great emphasis put on developing the COFUMACO, but we were constantly surprised with just how quickly the cadre improved. It is a great success story anytime a partner nation can take the next step forward in combating threats more effectively,” said Posey.

 

According to the CIA World Factbook, Senegal’s coastline is 531 km long; with a coastline roughly equal that of to the island of Puerto Rico, the importance of developing the nation’s amphibious inter-operability is obvious.

 

The infantry Marines were able to teach their counterparts in infantry and amphibious tactics because they had several trained coxswains on their team. A coxswain is a Marine who is trained to operate a Combat Rubber Reconnaissance Craft and its associated equipment.

 

As part of their pre-deployment training, the boat operators attended a course at their home station, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, that qualified the Marines in how to operate the CRRC.

 

According to Corporal Adam Newby, one of the TSC Team boat operators, the training he received at Camp Lejeune prepared him well to impart his skills on others. It was also a representation of a larger shift back to the Marine Corps’ amphibious roots.

“Beach landings were a big part of the (coxswain’s) course,” he said. On transferring his stateside training to his Senegalese partners, Newby said: “Everything we trained on in Senegal was leading up to conduct a beach raid. Being a coxswain is a rare opportunity. We’re able to be employed from ships or aircraft. Being able to be employed like that provides a great tactical advantage.

 

“The COFUMACO mentioned throughout our time together that, based on some of their experiences, they would have had a tactical advantage if they could’ve been employed by boat,” said Newby. “Being able to get in a boat and be confident, not only that but to land it and conduct a raid, that’s the greatest takeaway from the training.”

 

The Marines, from 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, are currently assigned to Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Africa 14 and are tasked with supporting Marine Forces Europe and Africa and US Africa Command by carrying out theatre security co-operation missions in various African countries in order to build partnerships and the capacity to address regional security concerns.

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12 juin 2014 4 12 /06 /juin /2014 10:45
General David M Rodriguez, Commanding General of US Africa Command (Africom)

General David M Rodriguez, Commanding General of US Africa Command (Africom)

 

10 June 2014 by US Army Africa/defenceWeb

 

Major General Patrick J Donahue II handed command of US Army Africa (USARAF) to Major General Darryl A Williams during a ceremony on Hoekstra Field at Vicenza in Italy.

 

General David M Rodriguez, Commanding General of US Africa Command (Africom) presided over the change of command ceremony.

 

“Under General Donahue’s leadership, Army Africa worked with the first Regionally Aligned Force and helped ensure its success,” Rodriguez said.

 

“When the regionally aligned force is training, exercising or enabling partners, US and African soldiers benefit from enhanced skills, inter-operability and readiness. The regionally aligned force also supports the protection of US personnel and facilities on the continent.”

 

Rodriguez praised Donahue’s leadership of USARAF.

 

“Another way the US Army is transforming to meet the challenges of the 21st century security environment is by developing leaders who can work effectively with a broad range of partners,” he said.

 

“This includes partners from other countries, government agencies and military services. Army Africa has deepened partnerships with African and European militaries, with civilian agencies and with other Service components,” Rodriguez said.

 

Rodriguez welcomed Williams as the incoming USARAF commander.

 

“As Pat and Maureen Donahue depart for Army Forces Command, they pass leadership of the Army Africa team to Darryl and his wife Erin. I know the Williams’ will continue to lead this team superbly. Thank you all for your continued contributions to advancing our nation’s interests in Africa. We will go forward, together," Rodriguez said.

 

Williams said he was thankful of the opportunity to serve as USARAF’s commander.

 

“Gen Rodriguez thank you for having confidence in me and giving me an opportunity to command this great organisation of soldiers and civilians.

 

"Pat (Donahue), the work you have done with the US Army Africa team has made great changes in Africa. I am honoured and humbled to follow in your footsteps and look forward to the challenge.” Williams said.

 

“USARAF’s mission on the continent of Africa could not be more relevant than it is today. The team of professionals you have assembled is proving each day how valuable they are to the mission. I look forward to working alongside these fine men and women,” the new force commander said.

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25 mars 2014 2 25 /03 /mars /2014 08:45
Sovereign Global France et Africom "épaule contre épaule" pour former les Tchadiens


24.03.2014 par Philippe Chapleau - Lignes de Défense
 

J'ai parlé, il y a quelques semaine, du contrat tchadien de Sovereign Global France (SGF) qui forme à Loumia (sud de N'Djamena) un contingent de 1 425 hommes. Ces soldats sont destiné à rejoindre, dans le courant de l'été prochain, la Mission Intégrée des Nations Unies au Mali (cliquer ici pour lire la fiche consacrée à ce programme sur le site de SGF).

Ce programme de préparation à l’engagement mobilise une trentaine de personnes qui, depuis septembre 2013 et jusqu'en juillet 2014, apportent aux Tchadiens un appui d’état-major, d’équipement et d’instruction opérationnelle.

Jusqu'au 25 mars et depuis quatre semaines, un détachement de l’US Army déployé par l'AFRICOM mène une action de formation complémentaire à celle de SGF (photo SGF ci-dessous).

sgf.jpg

Une soixantaine de soldats US de la 2e brigade de la 1ere division d'infanterie et quelques Rangers dispensent une formation individuelle aux Tchadiens. Selon un communiqué de la Présidence tchadienne, ces Américains ont reçu, jeudi dernier à Loumia, la visite d'une délégation du Congrès US, dirigée par Robert Wittman, et venue discuter de la coopération militaire avec le Tchad.

A noter que d'autres militaires US du 52e Ordnance Group sont récemment intervenus au centre de formation au déminage humanitaire de N'Djamena (photo US Army ci-dessous).

déminage.jpg

Intervenant dans le cadre du soutien américain aux armées africaines engagées dans les opérations de maintien de la paix, "ce groupe d’instructeurs oeuvre au quotidien aux côtés de ceux de SGF dans un climat d’excellente coopération et de parfaite cohérence, à la plus grande satisfaction des autorités tchadiennes", selon SGF.

 

Note RP Defense : Sovereign Global and AFRICOM: a successful cooperation

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13 mars 2014 4 13 /03 /mars /2014 17:45
With training and partnerships, U.S. military treads lightly in Africa

A Boeing Osprey used by the US Marine Corps

 

13 March 2014 defenceWeb (Reuters)

 

On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. "Speed, aggression, surprise!" an instructor barks as two Nigeriens wrestle a U.S. adviser out of a car.

 

The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organizes each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light.

 

A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region.

 

When Paris deployed 4,000 troops to fight Islamist militants in neighboring Mali last year, the U.S. military lent a hand by airlifting French soldiers and equipment, providing intelligence and training African forces to join the operation.

 

French troops are stretched by hunting the militants in Mali and tackling religious violence in Central African Republic, so only a handful participated in Flintlock. Nevertheless, they welcomed their new partnership with Washington.

 

"The Americans want to get involved in Africa. That's good for us. We know that with the Americans it will be more efficient," said a French Special Forces officer, who asked not to be named. "We use American logistics - that's what we are missing. On the other hand, we provide the local knowledge."

 

The United States fast-tracked the sale of 12 Reaper drones to France last year, the first two of which started operating in Niger in January alongside U.S. drones already there.

 

In a reminder of the partnership, a drone quietly taxied past troops and dignitaries at Flintlock's closing ceremony in the capital of Niamey before taking off to scour the Sahara.

 

U.S. FACING BUDGET CUTS

 

Military experts say direct U.S. military action in Africa is limited to short raids on "high-value" targets in places such as Somalia and Libya, while French troops take on longer, bigger operations.

 

J. Peter Pham, director of the Africa Center at the U.S.-based Atlantic Council, said this arrangement suited U.S. military planners who face budget cuts and a diminished American appetite for combat after conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

However, he warned that the French military was at the limit of its ability to strike militants hard. "If the French are not able to provide that blunt instrument, is the U.S. willing to do so?"

 

Nine years after the Flintlock exercises began, the enemy has evolved from a group of Algerian-dominated fighters focused on northern Mali and now threatens nations across the Sahara and the arid Sahel belt to the south.

 

For most of 2012, militants occupied northern Mali, a desert zone the size of France. Scattered by a French offensive last year, many are believed to be regrouping in southern Libya.

 

Hundreds of people are being killed every month in clashes with Boko Haram militants in northern Nigeria. Many in Niger fear this conflict could spill over the border and the government in Niamey has appealed for more military support.

 

"Instability in neighboring states has given everybody a new incentive," General James Linder, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command Africa, told Reuters while visiting Niger

 

This year's three-week Flintlock exercise - involving over 1,000 troops from 18 nations - was the biggest yet and runs alongside more permanent training by U.S. Special Forces in Niger, Mauritania, Senegal and Chad.

 

Training in Diffa, only a few kilometers from where Boko Haram militants are fighting the Nigerian army across the border, ranged from basic patrolling skills and setting up checkpoints to sharing intelligence and providing medical care.

 

In a region where armies often lack basics such as ammunition for target practice and fuel for vehicles, the quality and tempo of the U.S.-sponsored exercise eclipses the training most soldiers in the region receive in a year.

 

Colonel Mounkaila Sofiani, the local Niger commander, said Flintlock and other U.S. initiatives helped his country to tackle threats from the west, north and south better. "Little by little people are being trained," he said. "Once there are enough, they'll form the spine of a reliable force."

 

Training is meant to build up coordination between armies but Sofiani said just finding radio equipment compatible between nations is difficult. In the field, officers exchange mobile phone numbers to bypass blockages in official channels.

 

A lack of trust between governments also hinders responses. At a recent meeting of intelligence chiefs, the Nigerien and Libyan representatives argued over the risk of instability spreading from Libya's lawless south, a diplomat told Reuters.

 

Coups in Mauritania, Niger and Mali since the Flintlock exercises began also halted cooperation until civilian rule was restored. Mali's 2012 coup, led by a captain with U.S. training, opened the door to the Islamist takeover of the north, prompting questions about what the years of exercises had achieved.

 

Pham said better military capabilities had not been matched by improvements in governance, citing a failure by Mali to tackle corruption. Chad's military, however, has won praise for leading the charge alongside French troops in flushing out the militants from Mali's desolate northern mountains.

 

U.S. officials stress the exercise is African-led and are wary about people reading too much into U.S. troops being on the ground near African conflicts. But the show of foreign support is popular in Diffa.

 

"It sends a message to Boko Haram and others," said Inoussa Saouna, the central government's representative in Diffa. "Before Mali, we thought terrorism was a problem for whites but now we've experienced it ourselves."

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13 mars 2014 4 13 /03 /mars /2014 17:45
With training and partnerships, U.S. military treads lightly in Africa

A Boeing Osprey used by the US Marine Corps

 

13 March 2014 defenceWeb (Reuters)

 

On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. "Speed, aggression, surprise!" an instructor barks as two Nigeriens wrestle a U.S. adviser out of a car.

 

The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organizes each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light.

 

A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region.

 

When Paris deployed 4,000 troops to fight Islamist militants in neighboring Mali last year, the U.S. military lent a hand by airlifting French soldiers and equipment, providing intelligence and training African forces to join the operation.

 

French troops are stretched by hunting the militants in Mali and tackling religious violence in Central African Republic, so only a handful participated in Flintlock. Nevertheless, they welcomed their new partnership with Washington.

 

"The Americans want to get involved in Africa. That's good for us. We know that with the Americans it will be more efficient," said a French Special Forces officer, who asked not to be named. "We use American logistics - that's what we are missing. On the other hand, we provide the local knowledge."

 

The United States fast-tracked the sale of 12 Reaper drones to France last year, the first two of which started operating in Niger in January alongside U.S. drones already there.

 

In a reminder of the partnership, a drone quietly taxied past troops and dignitaries at Flintlock's closing ceremony in the capital of Niamey before taking off to scour the Sahara.

 

U.S. FACING BUDGET CUTS

 

Military experts say direct U.S. military action in Africa is limited to short raids on "high-value" targets in places such as Somalia and Libya, while French troops take on longer, bigger operations.

 

J. Peter Pham, director of the Africa Center at the U.S.-based Atlantic Council, said this arrangement suited U.S. military planners who face budget cuts and a diminished American appetite for combat after conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

However, he warned that the French military was at the limit of its ability to strike militants hard. "If the French are not able to provide that blunt instrument, is the U.S. willing to do so?"

 

Nine years after the Flintlock exercises began, the enemy has evolved from a group of Algerian-dominated fighters focused on northern Mali and now threatens nations across the Sahara and the arid Sahel belt to the south.

 

For most of 2012, militants occupied northern Mali, a desert zone the size of France. Scattered by a French offensive last year, many are believed to be regrouping in southern Libya.

 

Hundreds of people are being killed every month in clashes with Boko Haram militants in northern Nigeria. Many in Niger fear this conflict could spill over the border and the government in Niamey has appealed for more military support.

 

"Instability in neighboring states has given everybody a new incentive," General James Linder, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command Africa, told Reuters while visiting Niger

 

This year's three-week Flintlock exercise - involving over 1,000 troops from 18 nations - was the biggest yet and runs alongside more permanent training by U.S. Special Forces in Niger, Mauritania, Senegal and Chad.

 

Training in Diffa, only a few kilometers from where Boko Haram militants are fighting the Nigerian army across the border, ranged from basic patrolling skills and setting up checkpoints to sharing intelligence and providing medical care.

 

In a region where armies often lack basics such as ammunition for target practice and fuel for vehicles, the quality and tempo of the U.S.-sponsored exercise eclipses the training most soldiers in the region receive in a year.

 

Colonel Mounkaila Sofiani, the local Niger commander, said Flintlock and other U.S. initiatives helped his country to tackle threats from the west, north and south better. "Little by little people are being trained," he said. "Once there are enough, they'll form the spine of a reliable force."

 

Training is meant to build up coordination between armies but Sofiani said just finding radio equipment compatible between nations is difficult. In the field, officers exchange mobile phone numbers to bypass blockages in official channels.

 

A lack of trust between governments also hinders responses. At a recent meeting of intelligence chiefs, the Nigerien and Libyan representatives argued over the risk of instability spreading from Libya's lawless south, a diplomat told Reuters.

 

Coups in Mauritania, Niger and Mali since the Flintlock exercises began also halted cooperation until civilian rule was restored. Mali's 2012 coup, led by a captain with U.S. training, opened the door to the Islamist takeover of the north, prompting questions about what the years of exercises had achieved.

 

Pham said better military capabilities had not been matched by improvements in governance, citing a failure by Mali to tackle corruption. Chad's military, however, has won praise for leading the charge alongside French troops in flushing out the militants from Mali's desolate northern mountains.

 

U.S. officials stress the exercise is African-led and are wary about people reading too much into U.S. troops being on the ground near African conflicts. But the show of foreign support is popular in Diffa.

 

"It sends a message to Boko Haram and others," said Inoussa Saouna, the central government's representative in Diffa. "Before Mali, we thought terrorism was a problem for whites but now we've experienced it ourselves."

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12 mars 2014 3 12 /03 /mars /2014 12:45
Tunisie – Le ministère de la défense confirme la présence de militaires US en Tunisie

 

11 mars, 2014 tunisienumerique.com

 

Le porte-parole du ministère de la Défense, le colonel major Taoufik Rahmouni, a confirmé l’information rapportée par le « Los Angeles Times » en rapport avec le débarquement d’éléments des forces spéciales américaines arrivés par hélicoptère dans une base militaire dans le Sud de la Tunisie.

Il a cependant annoncé qu’ils ne sont aucunement au nombre de 50.

Le porte-parole a souligné que cette présence rentre dans le cadre d’un programme de formation et d’entraînement commun, et d’échange d’expériences et de visites entre le ministère de la Défense et le Pentagone , et que les éléments débarqués ne sont qu’une unité mobile spécialisée dans l’entraînement militaire.

Le colonel major Rahmouni a démenti catégoriquement toutes les « allégations » liant ces informations à une supposée installation d’une base militaire américaine dans le Sud tunisien ».

Le journal américain avait affirmé que l’opération de débarquement s’inscrit dans le cadre d’un accord entre les deux ministère de la Défense portant sur l’entraînement de militaires tunisiens en matière de techniques de lutte contre le terrorisme dans le but de former une élite de militaires tunisiens spécialisés dans l’anticipation des plans tactiques des terroristes.

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11 mars 2014 2 11 /03 /mars /2014 13:45
Le chef adjoint d’Africom chez le ministre libyen de la Défense

 

 

10 Mars 2014 webmanagercenter.com

 

Le commandant en chef adjoint d’Africom a dernièrement effectué une visite-éclair à Tripoli pour s’entretenir avec le ministre de la Défense, Abdullah al-Thini, en présence de l’ambassadrice Deborah K. Jones et de l’attaché militaire.

 

L’US Africa Command coordonne, depuis août 2013, les efforts de quatre pays occidentaux (Etats-Unis, Royaume Uni, Canada et Italie), de l’OTAN et des Nations unies en vue de renforcer la sécurité et la stabilité en Libye.

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8 mars 2014 6 08 /03 /mars /2014 12:45
Africom commander General David Rodriguez

Africom commander General David Rodriguez

 

 

07 March 2014 by American Forces Press Service - defenceWeb

 

Helped by the Arab Spring, terrorist groups in North and West Africa have expanded their operations, increasing threats to the United States and its interests, the commander of U.S. Africa Command told Congress on Thursday.

 

“These revolutions, coupled with the fragility of neighboring states, continue to destabilize the region,” Army General David M. Rodriguez told the Senate Armed Services Committee in prepared testimony.

 

“The spillover effects of revolutions include the return of fighters and flow of weapons from Libya to neighboring countries following the fall of the Gadhafi regime and the export of foreign fighters from North Africa to the Syrian conflict,” the general said.

 

Rodriguez described the security situation in Libya -- where a NATO-backed air campaign in 2011 aimed at protecting civilians from pro-Gadhafi forces eventually led to the leader’s overthrow -- as volatile and tenuous, especially in the east and southwest. “Militia groups control significant areas of territory and continue to exert pressure on the Libyan government,” he said.

 

Africom, he said, is working to help build Libyan security forces, but in the meantime, terrorist groups including those affiliated with al-Qaida have taken root in vast, lawless areas of the country and are using the region as a base to extend their reach across northwest Africa.

 

Farther west, though, Rodriguez pointed to success the United States and its French and African allies have had in stabilizing Mali, where Islamic extremists took control of a large swath of the desert country’s north following a coup two years ago. “U.S. support has enabled [United Nations forces] and French operations to secure key cities and disrupt terrorist organizations,” he added.

 

Rodriguez described challenges facing the United States and Europe across the continent, from the Sahael region in West Africa to Somalia in the east.

 

“The collective aftermath of revolutions in Libya, Tunisia and Egypt, including uncertain political transitions, spillover effects, and exploitation by violent extremist organizations of under-governed spaces and porous borders are key sources of instability that require us to remain vigilant in the near term,” he said. While multi-national efforts are disrupting terrorists, he added, “the growth and activity of the violent extremist network across the African continent continues to outpace these efforts.”

Rodriguez ticked off a list of security challenges facing the continent and his command.

 

Despite programs and exercises with Nigeria, the terrorist group Boko Haram continues to attack civilian and government facilities and has extended its reach into neighboring Niger, Chad and Cameroon. In Somalia, after having no presence in the country for years, the U.S. military now has three people on the ground, he said, to coordinate with U.N. and other partnered forces to disrupt and contain al-Shabaab forces and expand areas under the control of the nominal government in Mogadishu.

 

He described the efforts as playing “limited, but important roles” in weakening the militant group, which controls portions of the country and claimed responsibility for a massacre at a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in September that killed more than 60 people.

 

Rodriguez reported significant progress in reducing piracy.

 

“In 2013, zero ships were hijacked in nine attempted attacks in the region,” he said. Just two years earlier, there had been more than 150 attempted hijackings.

 

While Rodriguez said Africom is using military-to-military engagements, programs, exercises and other operations to respond to crises and deter threats, he emphasized that these efforts are geared toward enabling African partners to handle these problems.

“We believe efforts to meet security challenges in Africa are best led and conducted by African partners,” he said, efforts that ultimately will depend on African nations developing effective partner-nation security institutions that respect civilian authority.

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23 février 2014 7 23 /02 /février /2014 12:45
Sénégal : bilan 2013 des éléments français au Sénégal (EFS).

 

21/02/2014 Sources : EMA

 

En 2013, la conduite des actions de coopération opérationnelle avec les pays membres de la communauté économique des Etats de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et de la Mauritanie, a été particulièrement dynamique en raison, notamment, de l’engagement des éléments français au Sénégal (EFS) dans l’opération Serval.

 

Au bilan, 113 actions de coopération ont été conduites en 2013. Ces actions ont permis de former 4803 militaires africains dans 11 des 16 pays de la zone de responsabilité déléguée (ZRD) des EFS, représentant ainsi 1553 jours d’instruction cumulés.

 

Par ailleurs, le soutien à la mission Corymbe, la participation à des exercices internationaux comme Western Accord, l’un des plus importants exercices de l’Afrique de l’Ouest réalisé en collaboration avec l’AFRICOM, l’US Army Africa et la CEDEAO, ainsi que l’appui aux pays en sortie de crise, tels que la Guinée, la République de Côte d’Ivoire et le Mali, s’inscrivent dans le cadre des missions du pôle opérationnel de coopération (POC) des EFS.

 

L’année 2013 a permis de valider le concept de POC et a mis en avant la capacité des EFS à s’engager sur court préavis en opération. Avec cet acquis et la large palette des compétences détenues par le POC (formation du combattant jusqu’à celle des officiers servant en états-majors), les EFS rayonnent dans l’ensemble des pays de la ZRD.

 

En 2014, les EFS devraient conduire au minimum 120 actions de formation et former environ 5 000 militaires africains.

 

Création unique en Afrique, les éléments français au Sénégal (EFS) ont vu le jour le 1er août 2011, à la disparition des forces françaises du Cap-Vert. Cette transformation profonde est due à la réorganisation du dispositif français des forces de présence et à la renégociation des accords de défense liant la France et le Sénégal depuis 1974. Un nouvel accord de partenariat en matière de coopération militaire a été signé en 2012.

 

Majoritairement tournés vers la coopération militaire opérationnelle en Afrique de l’Ouest, les EFS disposent également de la capacité d’accueillir, de soutenir et de commander une force projetée.

Sénégal : bilan 2013 des éléments français au Sénégal (EFS).Sénégal : bilan 2013 des éléments français au Sénégal (EFS).

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4 décembre 2013 3 04 /12 /décembre /2013 17:45
Tchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force Épervier

 

04/12/2013 Sources : EMA

 

Le 22 novembre 2013, le général d’armée David Rodriguez, chef du commandement régional des États-Unis pour l’Afrique (AFRICOM) a rendu visite aux militaires engagés au sein de la force Épervier à N’Djaména.

 

La délégation américaine conduite par son excellence monsieur James Knight, ambassadeur américain au Tchad est arrivée vers 9h30 sur la base « SGC Adji Kosseï ». La visite a débuté par une présentation de la mission générale de la force Épervier par le colonel Alain Dupas, chef de l’état-major interarmées de la force. Elle s’est ensuite poursuivie par une visite du détachement américain implanté au sein du CAOC (Combined Air Operation Center, le Centre interarmées des opérations aériennes) qui a pour mission de planifier et de conduire l’ensemble des missions aériennes au profit des différentes opérations et forces stationnées en l’Afrique Centrale et de l’Ouest. Cette visite s’est achevée par le groupement Terre et le groupement Air qui ont présenté leurs implantations et effectué des démonstrations dynamiques de leurs matériels.

 

Cette rencontre s’inscrit dans le cadre de la coopération bilatérale et du dialogue militaire régulier entretenu entre la France et les États-Unis. Créé en 2007 et stationné à Stuttgart en Allemagne, l’AFRICOM a pour mission de coordonner les activités militaires des États-Unis sur le continent africain. Il constitue un partenaire privilégié dans des régions où la France entretient une présence permanente à travers son dispositif de forces prépositionnées ou en opération, comme au Tchad.

 

Les militaires de la force Épervier assurent deux missions permanentes : ils apportent un soutien aux forces armées et de sécurité (FADS) tchadiennes, conformément à l’accord de coopération technique signé entre la France et le Tchad et sont en mesure de garantir, si nécessaire, la sécurité des ressortissants français résidant au Tchad.

Tchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force ÉpervierTchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force Épervier
Tchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force ÉpervierTchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force Épervier
Tchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force ÉpervierTchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force ÉpervierTchad : AFRICOM rencontre la force Épervier

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18 octobre 2013 5 18 /10 /octobre /2013 11:45
De Djibouti vers le Sahel en perdant des plumes au passage

16.10.2013 par P. CHAPLEAU - Lignes de Défense

 

Ce n'est pas tout à fait un nouveau "partage de l'Afrique" entre Américains et Français puisqu'il n'y a pas de compétition entre les deux puissances (le mot est-il juste?) mais on assiste actuellement aux prémices d'une réaffectation des moyens militaires franco-américains, pour des raisons tant stratégiques que budgétaires.

 

Différentes informations données sur ce blog démontrent l'effort US en direction de Djibouti.

 

Le 26 septembre, par exemple, j'écrivais:

"775 millions de dollars en deux ans! Pour 2013, ce sont déjà quelque 343 millions de dollars de travaux qui ont été commandés (s'y ajoutent une partie d'un contrat de 179 millions de dollars passé en septembre dans le cadre du programme Saturn Arch de renseignement satellitaire). Pour 2012, ce sont au moins 432 millions de dollars de travaux, aménagements et équipements qui ont été dépensés pour le camp Lemonnier."

Le dispositif US, qui se consolide en permanence, permettra à l'AFRICOM et au CENTCOM de disposer d'une base de lutte anti-piraterie, d'une plate-forme anti-terroriste (avec des drones), d'un hub logistique etc. Autant de capacités qui rendent quasiment obsolète la présence à Djibouti de certaines forces françaises (actuellement 2 100 hommes) et la poursuite de certaines missions. Certes, les militaires du 5e RIAOM ou les cadres de la mission de coopération et de défense (rattachés au MAE) ne seront pas d'accord avec moi. Mais, leur avenir est compté. L'EMA planche sur des scénari et le ministère réfléchit à la "réarticulation des forces prépositionnées en fonction de la régionalisation de notre action au Sahel". En clair, "il faut alléger ici où là" ("ici et là", plus précisément).

 

D'où le probable basculement du centre de gravité français vers le Sahel où Serval sera bien, comme annoncé et promis, réduit à un millier d'hommes mais où un dispositif régional durable (sous statut de forces prépositionnées?) pourrait bénéficier du départ de Djibouti de certaines capacités terrestres.

 

A Djibouti, comme l'ont avancé certains collègues, ne pourraient rester qu'une composante aérienne (quelques chasseurs) et, peut-être, une composante entraînement.

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6 octobre 2013 7 06 /10 /octobre /2013 12:17
Les États-Unis capturent un des chefs d'al-Qaida

06/10/2013 Par lefigaro.fr
 

Abou Anas al-Libi, recherché depuis quinze ans pour son rôle dans les attentats de 1998 contre des ambassades américaines au Kenya et en Tanzanie, a été capturé en Libye. Les forces spéciales américaines ont également mené un raid contre les Chebab en Somalie.

 

Quinze ans que les États-Unis souhaitaient sa capture. Abou Anas al-Libi, un des leaders présumés d'al-Qaida, est depuis samedi soir entre les mains de Washington. L'homme de 49 ans, accusé d'être responsable des attentats meurtriers de 1998 contre les ambassades américaines en Tanzanie et au Kenya, a été arrêté en Libye lors d'un raid des forces spéciales mené en plein jour à Tripoli.

«Les Etats-Unis d'Amérique ne cesseront jamais leurs efforts pour que les responsables d'actes de terrorisme rendent des comptes», a déclaré dimanche le secrétaire d'Etat John Kerry

 

224 morts en 1998

Abou Anas al-Libi, de son vrai nom Nazih Abdul Hamed al-Raghie, était membre du Groupe islamique de combat libyen (Gicl) avant de rallier le réseau d'al-Qaida. Durant des années, il s'est battu pour renverser le régime de Mouammar Kadhafi afin d'instaurer en Libye un État islamiste radical. Le Groupe islamique de combat libyen était dirigé depuis l'Asie centrale par un des tout premiers lieutenant d'Oussama Ben laden, Abou Laith al-Libi.

Abou Anas al-Libi a fini par rejoindre la mouvance al-Qaida, et aurait joué un rôle central dans les attentats du 7 août 1998. Ce jour là, une voiture piégée devant l'ambassade américaine à Nairobi avait fait 213 morts, dont seuls 44 travaillaient à l'ambassade. Simultanément, un camion-citerne piégé avait explosé devant l'ambassade américaine à Dar es-Salaam, en Tanzanie, tuant 11 passants.

 

 

La tête d'Abou Anas al-Libi était mise à prix depuis 15 ans: le FBI offrait 5 millions de dollars pour sa capture. L'opération qui a permis sa capture s'est faite avec l'accord du gouvernement libyen. L'homme est détenu «dans un endroit sûr à l'extérieur de la Libye», et devrait rapidement être transféré aux Etats-Unis pour y être jugé.

 

Opération contre les Chebab

24 heures plus tôt, dans la nuit de vendredi à samedi, les forces spéciales américaines se sont également attaquées à une base chebab en Somalie. Le résultat de cette opération, visant à mettre la main sur un leader chebab très recherché, est flou. L'homme n'a pas été capturé, mais aurait pu être tué lors des combats. «Les militaires américains ont pris toutes les précautions nécessaires pour évier des pertes civiles dans cette opération et se sont retirés après avoir infligé quelques pertes aux shebab», a déclaré un porte-parole américain.

Les chebab, eux, avaient annoncé dès samedi matin qu'ils avaient été attaqués par des forces occidentales, «mais on leur a infligé une leçon et ils ont échoué», ont-ils affirmé. «L'opération ratée a été menée par des Blancs», qui ont accosté à bord de «deux petits bateaux partis d'une plus grande embarcation en mer (...) Un garde shebab a été tué, mais les renforts sont arrivés rapidement et les étrangers ont fui», a raconté à l'AFP le porte-parole chebab, Abdulaziz Abu Musab.

«J'ai été réveillé par le bruit d'un hélicoptère tournant autour du quartier et quelques minutes plus tard, des coups de feu ont éclaté et duré près de 10 minutes», a raconté un témoin sous couvert d'anonymat. «Je ne sais pas exactement ce qui s'est passé, mais c'était une attaque organisée visant une maison où se trouvaient des commandants shebab». «Ce matin, on ne peut pas s'approcher du lieu de l'attaque, des shebab lourdement armés ont bouclé la zone», a indiqué un autre habitant.

Cette attaque américaine intervient deux semaines après la sanglante prise d'otages du centre commercial Westgate de Nairobi, au Kenya, revendiquée par les Chebab.

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